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You searched for subject:(Arizona early childhood). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Arizona State University

1. Bia, Sunshine Sallie. Shíyazhi Sha'a'wéé' Diné Nilih. A'daayoo nééhlagoh. My Child, You Are Diné.

Degree: MA, Curriculum and Instruction, 2011, Arizona State University

Early childhood is a special and amazing period in a child's development. It is a period during which all facets of a human being-cognitive, linguistic, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual – are rapidly developing and influenced by a child's interactions with her socializers and environment. Fundamentally, what happens during this critical period will influence and impact a child's future learning. Much of what is known about children's development comes from research focusing primarily on mainstream English speaking children. However, not much that is known about Indigenous children and their early period of child development. Therefore, this thesis research focused on Diné children and their early childhood experiences that occur during the fundamental time period before Diné children enter preschool. It also examines the contemporary challenges that Diné parents and other cultural caretakers face in ensuring that Diné infants and young children are taught those important core elements that make them uniquely Diné. The research questions that guide this thesis are: 1.What do Diné people believe about children and their abilities? 2.What do Diné children need to learn in order to become Diné? 3. What are the Diné childhood rearing beliefs and practices? 4. Why aren't Diné parents and grandparents teaching their children how to be Diné? Findings reveal an early childhood experience in which children are viewed as true explorers and highly intelligent, inquisitive learners and included as integral participants and contributors to the family and community. This thesis concludes with a discussion of the multidimensional transitions, such as the shift from the Diné language to English in Diné homes and communities that have occurred in the Diné way of life and how they have impacted how Diné children are socialized. Creative alternatives for increasing Diné childhood speakers on and off the Navajo reservation are also considered.

Subjects/Keywords: Early Childhood Education; Native American Studies; Curriculum Development; Canyon De Chelly; Arizona; Chief Barboncito; Diné Early Childhood; mother tongue; Navajo; Retrospective

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APA (6th Edition):

Bia, S. S. (2011). Shíyazhi Sha'a'wéé' Diné Nilih. A'daayoo nééhlagoh. My Child, You Are Diné. (Masters Thesis). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/9269

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bia, Sunshine Sallie. “Shíyazhi Sha'a'wéé' Diné Nilih. A'daayoo nééhlagoh. My Child, You Are Diné.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Arizona State University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://repository.asu.edu/items/9269.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bia, Sunshine Sallie. “Shíyazhi Sha'a'wéé' Diné Nilih. A'daayoo nééhlagoh. My Child, You Are Diné.” 2011. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bia SS. Shíyazhi Sha'a'wéé' Diné Nilih. A'daayoo nééhlagoh. My Child, You Are Diné. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Arizona State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/9269.

Council of Science Editors:

Bia SS. Shíyazhi Sha'a'wéé' Diné Nilih. A'daayoo nééhlagoh. My Child, You Are Diné. [Masters Thesis]. Arizona State University; 2011. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/9269


Arizona State University

2. Odongo Okong'O, Benson Charles. A Descriptive Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Music Practices in the State of Arizona.

Degree: PhD, Curriculum and Instruction, 2011, Arizona State University

This dissertation discusses the findings of a descriptive study of early childhood teachers' musical practices in the state of Arizona. Drawing from socio-cultural and cultural-historical activity theory perspectives, this study utilized an online survey design for 2 months in which 312 participants from distinctive types of programs responded to 42 items that addressed early childhood teachers' music practices, perceived role of music, the teachers' preparation, challenges and needs for teaching music in their programs. The study uses the findings to explore how music is incorporated into the curriculum, its role, challenges and needs for teachers as well as inform policy makers of the effectiveness of music in early childhood curriculum that might bring about a resurgence of thinking about funding opportunities to promote music in different programs that serve children. These results reflected the diversity of most early childhood programs in the U.S in areas of scheduling, types of programs, working environments and curricular approaches used as well as in the duration and frequencies of music activities. However, there was a significant difference between how music was used in elementary versus early childhood centers. The results revealed that, although teachers used music at various times, for various reasons, planned or unplanned and as an integral part of other content areas, there was great variance in the manner in which music was emphasized in the total curriculum. In this study context, music in early childhood education centers was mostly teacher led and its value was geared towards specific behavioral outcome such as enhancement of language development rather than sheer enjoyment and relaxation. Although teachers used music on a daily basis, they were inadequately prepared and most teachers were looking for opportunities to improve their music abilities including required courses and workshops on ways of effectively incorporating music into curriculum/classroom. Funding, time and lack of confidence remain top challenges for early childhood and elementary teachers. The study recommends that music courses be required in teacher education programs and refresher workshops for in-service teachers about how to effectively use music in classrooms be more widely available.

Subjects/Keywords: Curriculum development; Early childhood education; Music education; Education; Social sciences; Descriptive study; Early childhood education; Teachers'; music practices; State of Arizona; Music education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Odongo Okong'O, B. C. (2011). A Descriptive Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Music Practices in the State of Arizona. (Doctoral Dissertation). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/14478

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Odongo Okong'O, Benson Charles. “A Descriptive Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Music Practices in the State of Arizona.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Arizona State University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://repository.asu.edu/items/14478.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Odongo Okong'O, Benson Charles. “A Descriptive Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Music Practices in the State of Arizona.” 2011. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Odongo Okong'O BC. A Descriptive Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Music Practices in the State of Arizona. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Arizona State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/14478.

Council of Science Editors:

Odongo Okong'O BC. A Descriptive Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Music Practices in the State of Arizona. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Arizona State University; 2011. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/14478


Arizona State University

3. Bucher, Eric Zachary. We Observe, We Reflect, We Research: Data-Driven, Job-Embedded Science Professional Development with Early Head Start Teachers.

Degree: Leadership and Innovation, 2019, Arizona State University

Subjects/Keywords: Early childhood education; Adult education; Science education; Arizona early childhood; data-driven; Early Head Start; infant and toddler science; job-embedded professional development; teacher research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bucher, E. Z. (2019). We Observe, We Reflect, We Research: Data-Driven, Job-Embedded Science Professional Development with Early Head Start Teachers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/53652

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bucher, Eric Zachary. “We Observe, We Reflect, We Research: Data-Driven, Job-Embedded Science Professional Development with Early Head Start Teachers.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Arizona State University. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://repository.asu.edu/items/53652.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bucher, Eric Zachary. “We Observe, We Reflect, We Research: Data-Driven, Job-Embedded Science Professional Development with Early Head Start Teachers.” 2019. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bucher EZ. We Observe, We Reflect, We Research: Data-Driven, Job-Embedded Science Professional Development with Early Head Start Teachers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Arizona State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/53652.

Council of Science Editors:

Bucher EZ. We Observe, We Reflect, We Research: Data-Driven, Job-Embedded Science Professional Development with Early Head Start Teachers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Arizona State University; 2019. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/53652

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