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Rutgers University

1. Martínez, Enmanuel, 1989-. The archipelago and the archive: transnational archival modes and mediums in Caribbean literatures and states.

Degree: PhD, Caribbean literature, 2019, Rutgers University

While the archival turn in the Humanities has, by and large, focused on metaphysical conceptualizations of archives, the field of Archival Science privileges the study of the physical characteristics and material importance of our modern archival records and repositories. Both assume the nation-state and continental frameworks as their units of analysis. My dissertation, drawing on (Spanish, Anglophone, and Francophone) Caribbean literature, history, and politics, thus attends to ways that Afro-Caribbean and Caribbean diasporic narratives representing (trans)national archival practices illustrate archipelagic and decolonial conceptions of archiving and diasporic belonging; which I find capable of bridging the material/metaphysical, national/transnational, together with insular/continental interruptions that characterize modern archival theory and practice in the Humanities and beyond. Drawing on an assemblage of literary, historical, legal, visual, and scientific texts, including the crónicas of conquest from the early colonial period in the Americas, the drama of William Shakespeare and Simone Schwarz-Bart, fiction by Andrew Holleran, Tiphanie Yanique, and Junot Díaz, nonfiction by Jamaica Kincaid, and archival video footage of the U.S. National Archives Building, I formulate a theory of the coloniality of modern archival power; showing how the legacies of the global history of European colonization—starting with(in) the Caribbean archipelago—continue to shape our archival imaginaries, records, and repositories today in the era of postcoloniality. In all, the broader intellectual contributions of the project are twofold. The Archipelago and the Archive demonstrates the value of Comparative Literature to the field of Island Studies, the latter of which has, until more recently, overlooked the methodological contributions of literary analysis in favor of quantitative and qualitative Social Science research methods. Second, the dissertation foregrounds the role that archipelagic and decolonial frameworks of analysis play in efforts to understand the respective histories of Western modernity, the modern nation-state, and the modern (national) archive and how the three, together, consolidate in the crossing of archival power and the coloniality of power. Engaging with the archipelagic staging of modernity’s war paradigm in William Shakespeare’s final play The Tempest (1611), chapter one asserts that the transnational history of nineteenth and twentieth-century U.S. imperialism abroad in the Caribbean contributes to the domestic history of the U.S. National Archive building in Washington, D.C. established in 1934. Shifting from chapter one's consideration of the physical space of the modern (national) archive, chapter two turns, instead, to an analysis of the coloniality of archival power through a close reading of the archival imaginary in Andrew Holleran's debut novel Dancer from the Dance (1978). I argue that the canonical Dancer articulates a literary archive of gay 1970s NYC evidencing the insular sites and sights of… Advisors/Committee Members: Martinez-San Miguel, Yolanda (chair), Maldonado-Torres, Nelson (internal member), Sifuentes-Jauregui, Ben (internal member), Stephens, Michelle Ann (outside member), School of Graduate Studies.

Subjects/Keywords: Comparative Literature; Caribbean Area  – Colonial influence; Archives  – United States; Archives  – Caribbean Area

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APA (6th Edition):

Martínez, Enmanuel, 1. (2019). The archipelago and the archive: transnational archival modes and mediums in Caribbean literatures and states. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60890/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martínez, Enmanuel, 1989-. “The archipelago and the archive: transnational archival modes and mediums in Caribbean literatures and states.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60890/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martínez, Enmanuel, 1989-. “The archipelago and the archive: transnational archival modes and mediums in Caribbean literatures and states.” 2019. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Martínez, Enmanuel 1. The archipelago and the archive: transnational archival modes and mediums in Caribbean literatures and states. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60890/.

Council of Science Editors:

Martínez, Enmanuel 1. The archipelago and the archive: transnational archival modes and mediums in Caribbean literatures and states. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60890/

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