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Leiden University

1. Buijs, Charlotte. Appositional long bone growth as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population from The Netherlands.

Degree: 2014, Leiden University

Bones grow in length and in width, growth in length occurs via longitudinal growth, growth in width is reached by an increase in cortical thickness via appositional growth. Longitudinal growth has intensively been used as an indicator for children’s health and nutritional status in past populations. As appositional growth is also influenced by malnutrition and disease, it suggested that appositional bone growth might be used as an indicator for stress. The aim of this study was to confirm whether appositional growth could be used as an indicator for stress during childhood in a nineteenth century rural population from Middenbeemster, the Netherlands. This population is known to have suffered from malnutrition and epidemic outbreaks, which makes this population ideal for this research. In order to study longitudinal length, femoral length was plotted against dental age of Middenbeemster subadults. To study appositional growth, cortical thickness, measured on X-rays, was plotted against dental age. These were compared with long bone lengths and cortical thicknesses of modern populations. It appeared that Middenbeemster subadults between 7 and 11 years old were deficient in longitudinal growth compared to modern children, and that children younger than 7 years were not deficient in longitudinal growth. Middenbeemster children were deficient in appositional growth. This deficiency was greatest in children between 9 and 12 years old, but children younger than 7 were also deficient. The Middenbeemster subadults were generally more deficient in appositional growth than in longitudinal growth. This study showed that appositional growth could be used as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population. It appeared to be a more sensitive indicator than longitudinal growth. Hopefully, appositional growth will be more widely appreciated as an indicator for stress in health studies in past populations. However, more research in populations from different time periods or geographical areas will strengthen its position. Advisors/Committee Members: Inskip, Sarah (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Appositional growth; longitudinal growth; long bone length; cortical thickness; cortical index; Harris lines; Middenbeemster skeletal collection

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APA (6th Edition):

Buijs, C. (2014). Appositional long bone growth as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population from The Netherlands. (Masters Thesis). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28365

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Buijs, Charlotte. “Appositional long bone growth as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population from The Netherlands.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Leiden University. Accessed December 11, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28365.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Buijs, Charlotte. “Appositional long bone growth as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population from The Netherlands.” 2014. Web. 11 Dec 2018.

Vancouver:

Buijs C. Appositional long bone growth as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population from The Netherlands. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Leiden University; 2014. [cited 2018 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28365.

Council of Science Editors:

Buijs C. Appositional long bone growth as an indicator for stress in a nineteenth century rural population from The Netherlands. [Masters Thesis]. Leiden University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28365

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