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You searched for subject:(Antiretrovirals ARVs ). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Pretoria

1. Kwanisai, Felistus. Antiretroviral treatment : challenges experienced by HIV positive women in Zimbabwe.

Degree: MA, Social Work and Criminology, 2014, University of Pretoria

HIV and AIDS which was discovered in the 1980s is causing havoc in many developing countries and Sub-Saharan continent is the hardest hit. Pratt (2008:8) highlights that “the number of people living with the disease is concentrated in the industrially developing world, mostly in those resource deprived countries least able to afford the care of HIV-infected people”. Zimbabwe is one of the SADC countries with the highest statistics of HIV and AIDS. Women account for the largest number of people infected by the pandemic and this could be as a result of the social and cultural norms which oppress women and their position in society. Antiretrovirals (ARV’s) are the life-long drugs given to HIV-infected people to slow the progression of the disease. There are different types of ARV regimens. Zimbabwe introduced the ART roll-out in 2004, however the ART users face multiple obstacles in accessing ARVs. The study targets women because they are a vulnerable group in society, specifically in Zimbabwe. Women have been subjected to stigma, discrimination, violence, humiliation, degradation and psychological torture when they are identified as being HIV positive. Some are neglected and deserted by their partners and families after disclosure, as a result many are too scared to disclose their status to families. The country’s political and economic situation has a major impact on the HIV positive women’s access to ARV treatment. This is compounded with the social and cultural norms and values of the people. The focus of this study is on the challenges experienced by HIV positive women with regard to accessing ARV treatment in Zimbabwe. This study strived to understand the challenges HIV positive women encounter in adhering and accessing to ARV treatment. The goal was to explore the challenges experienced by HIV positive women with regard to accessing ARV treatment in Zimbabwe. The research question of the study was: What are the challenges experienced by HIV positive women with regard to accessing ARV treatment in Zimbabwe? This study used a qualitative approach with a collective case study research design. The population for this study was the African women from Zimbabwe who were infected with HIV and AIDS. Non-probability purposive sampling was utilised in this study to select the sample of 10 women who were living with HIV and AIDS in Masvingo District, Zimbabwe and who were accessing ART. Specific criteria for sampling was used to select clients of two NGO’s in Masvingo district of Zimbabwe: Batanai HIV and AIDS Service Organisation and the Reformed Church in Zimbabwe Community Based AIDS Program. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were used to collect data. The researcher sought permission of the participants to voice record their interviews and the researcher transcribed them personally. The data gathered was analysed and theme and sub-themes were generated from the data. The research findings were presented thereafter by providing a profile of research participants followed by thematic… Advisors/Committee Members: Carbonatto, C.L. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Antiretrovirals (ARVs); Treatment; Stigma; Women; Discrimination; UCTD

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kwanisai, F. (2014). Antiretroviral treatment : challenges experienced by HIV positive women in Zimbabwe. (Masters Thesis). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2263/43137

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kwanisai, Felistus. “Antiretroviral treatment : challenges experienced by HIV positive women in Zimbabwe.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Pretoria. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2263/43137.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kwanisai, Felistus. “Antiretroviral treatment : challenges experienced by HIV positive women in Zimbabwe.” 2014. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kwanisai F. Antiretroviral treatment : challenges experienced by HIV positive women in Zimbabwe. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/43137.

Council of Science Editors:

Kwanisai F. Antiretroviral treatment : challenges experienced by HIV positive women in Zimbabwe. [Masters Thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/43137


University of Pretoria

2. Stadler, Jonathan James. Shared secrets – concealed sufferings : social responses to the AIDS epidemic in Bushbuckridge, South Africa.

Degree: Anthropology and Archaeology, 2012, University of Pretoria

From the early 1990s, rates of HIV infection increased dramatically in South Africa and by the early 2000s, AIDS emerged as the main cause of death for adult South Africans. During the first half of the 2000s, the South African government’s response to this crisis was inadequate, marked by denial and delays in implementing prevention and treatment, resulting in thousands of preventable deaths. Yet, apart from the challenges posed by the predominantly urban-based Treatment Action Campaign (TAC), the absence of a social response to this crisis is notable, especially in rural settings. This scenario forms the broad backdrop to this ethnographic study that draws on participant observation and interviews undertaken over a three-year period (2002-2005) in KwaBomba village previously in the Gazankulu Homeland, now located in the Bushbuckridge municipality of the South African lowveld. An ethnographic perspective provides an intimate vantage point from which to view peoples’ experiences of the AIDS epidemic and their responses in context. This perspective draws attention to gaps in public health and biomedical understandings of the epidemic and suggests alternatives to these understandings. In Bushbuckridge, mortality and morbidity due to AIDS became visible in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Households were incapable of dealing with the burden of illness and death while the health services were often unwilling and ill-prepared. HIV prevention campaigns based on individual behaviour change were not well suited to a context in which HIV spread through sexual networks. Despite widespread awareness of the threat of AIDS, the disease was subjected to public censorship and AIDS suffering was concealed. Public discourses of AIDS were hidden within gossip and rumour and articulated as witchcraft suspicions and accusations. Although these discourses appear to deny and suppress the reality of AIDS, I suggest that they are active attempts to deal with the AIDS crisis: gossip and rumour allocate blame and construct a local epidemiology through which the epidemic can be surveilled; interpreting AIDS as witchcraft creates the possibility of avenging untimely death. These discursive forms are critical in informing individual and social responses to the AIDS epidemic. While the absence of public acknowledgement of AIDS as a cause of illness and death suggests denial and fatalism and appears to limit public action, subaltern discourses create shared secrets to manage the AIDS epidemic at the local level. Furthermore, these discourses may constitute a form of resistance against biomedical models of causality. Ethnographic enquiry at the local level offers a nuanced understanding of social responses to the AIDS epidemic. By examining forms of expression that lie outside the domain of public health, the thesis reveals how these constitute significant forms of social action in response to the epidemic. Advisors/Committee Members: McNeill, Fraser G. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Antiretrovirals (ARVs); Social suffering; Witchcraft; Gossip and rumour; Secrecy; Sexual networks; History; Lowveld; Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); Ethnography; UCTD; Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stadler, J. (2012). Shared secrets – concealed sufferings : social responses to the AIDS epidemic in Bushbuckridge, South Africa. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2263/23025

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stadler, Jonathan. “Shared secrets – concealed sufferings : social responses to the AIDS epidemic in Bushbuckridge, South Africa.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pretoria. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2263/23025.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stadler, Jonathan. “Shared secrets – concealed sufferings : social responses to the AIDS epidemic in Bushbuckridge, South Africa.” 2012. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Stadler J. Shared secrets – concealed sufferings : social responses to the AIDS epidemic in Bushbuckridge, South Africa. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Pretoria; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/23025.

Council of Science Editors:

Stadler J. Shared secrets – concealed sufferings : social responses to the AIDS epidemic in Bushbuckridge, South Africa. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Pretoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/23025

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