Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Anticommunication). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Florida

1. O'Brien, Benjamin M. A Theory on Musical Translation.

Degree: PhD, Music, 2015, University of Florida

As an electroacoustic composer, I am interested in establishing connections between disparate, even seemingly unrelated, sounds. I use computer technology to fabricate sonic regions of coincidence, where my coordinated mix of carefully selected sounds suggests relationships between the sounds and the illusions they foster. My interest in inscribing the spectral qualities of individual sounds into sequences of sounds defines my compositional practice. If one were to generalize and categorize my compositional interests, one could argue that, when performed successfully, this practice is akin to the procedures of a translator, who determines the semantic meaning of a linguistic message encoded in the sender's language and communicates it in the language of the receiver. Others may adopt the position that though the composer may create a system that resembles a linguistic-based model, her highly personal music, in all its complexities, is non-translatable. Additionally, there may be some who condemn this discussion as being wholly moot given their position that music is not a linguistic-based system of communication in which propositional semantic meaning is determined through distributional and syntactic organization and is therefore incapable of being translated. This dissertation addresses these ideas and explores the possibility for translation in music as I define it. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: KOONCE,PAUL CHRISTIAN (committee chair), CROOK,LARRY NORMAN (committee member), STENNER,JACK E (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Bird songs; Birds; Composers; Language; Language translation; Music appreciation; Music composition; Musical dissonance; Sound; Violins; anticommunication  – composition  – electroacoustics  – language  – translation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

O'Brien, B. M. (2015). A Theory on Musical Translation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0047724

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Brien, Benjamin M. “A Theory on Musical Translation.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0047724.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Brien, Benjamin M. “A Theory on Musical Translation.” 2015. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

O'Brien BM. A Theory on Musical Translation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0047724.

Council of Science Editors:

O'Brien BM. A Theory on Musical Translation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2015. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0047724

2. Scott, Robert W. An intellectual history of the School for Designing a Society.

Degree: PhD, 0220, 2011, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation traces the roots of an experimental art school for social change called the School for Designing a Society. It focuses on the history of a group of intellectuals, and their ideas, during the latter half of the twentieth century. The composer Herbert Brün (1918-2000) formulated many of the original ideas used by the school in concert with his students and colleagues at the University of Illinois. This study focuses on how their ideas about composition led to the founding of a school. It begins with the turmoil of World War II, which influenced experimental artists such as Brün; the development of cybernetics as an interdisciplinary field; the attempt of Brün and cyberneticians to offer an experimental interdisciplinary course in 1968. As the 1960s faded out, a new crop of music composition students rallied around Brün. They formed an ensemble and renewed the bridge to cybernetics; the ensemble achieved a high level of professionalism and toured internationally. Elements of Marianne Brün’s course on Designing Society, and Susan Parenti’s skill at organizing an experimental arts ensemble led to a 1992 proposal to start a school. Members of the ensemble needed a discursive context to engage the political and social consequences of experimental art production. Rather than scatter to various university jobs, or wrangle with the local University’s structure, the group decided to create their own school, off-campus. The School for Designing a Society thus arose out of a necessity that was generated by desire. Advisors/Committee Members: Darder, Antonia (advisor), Darder, Antonia (Committee Chair), Pak, Yoon K. (committee member), Dhillon, Pradeep A. (committee member), Ginsburg, Rebecca (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Adorno; Alternative Education; American Society for Cybernetics; Anticommunication; Atonality; Black Mountain College; Biological Computing Laboratory; Brün; Composition; Constructivism; Cybernetics; Desire; Design; Experimental; Folk School; Freire; Frankfurt School; Highlander; Heuristic; Horton; Illich; Illinois; Information Theory; Language; Maturana; Music; New Music; Performers' Workshop Ensemble; Politics; Political Change; School for Designing a Society; Situationist International; Social Change; Society; Systems Theory; University of Illinois; von Foerster

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scott, R. W. (2011). An intellectual history of the School for Designing a Society. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24073

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scott, Robert W. “An intellectual history of the School for Designing a Society.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24073.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scott, Robert W. “An intellectual history of the School for Designing a Society.” 2011. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Scott RW. An intellectual history of the School for Designing a Society. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24073.

Council of Science Editors:

Scott RW. An intellectual history of the School for Designing a Society. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24073

.