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You searched for subject:(Anti psychotic). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Queens University

1. Steel, Ryland. Multiple Memory Systems in People With Schizophrenia: Possible Effect of Atypical Anti-Psychotic Medications .

Degree: Neuroscience Studies, 2013, Queens University

Patients with schizophrenia are normally treated with one of several antipsychotic medications that differ from one another in the areas of the brain they affect including the dorsal striatum, a subcortical section of the forebrain, and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), located in the anterior part of the frontal lobes. Two different tests of implicit memory, the probabilistic classification learning (PCL) and the Iowa gambling task (IGT), have been shown to rely on the dorsal striatum and the PFC, respectively. Studies have previously shown that patients with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics that affect the dorsal striatum (e.g., risperidone), have altered performance on the PCL, and those treated with antipsychotics that affect the PFC (e.g., clozapine), have altered performance on the IGT. We tested the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine would have a poorer performance on the IGT, but not the PCL, when compared with controls. This study aimed to clarify conflicting results from prior experiments observing the effects of olanzapine on implicit memory in people with schizophrenia. We also hypothesized that performance of patients taking aripiprazole would be comparable to those taking risperidone, or an FGA; however, we were unable to recruit a sufficient amount of participants to test this hypothesis. Patients with schizophrenia, a mental disorder characterized by a breakdown in relation between thoughts, emotion, and behavior, treated with olanzapine were recruited through local psychiatric clinics or using a newspaper ad. Administration of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) preceded a brief questionnaire of demographic information. Participants were tested on the PCL and the IGT using a personal computer. Results revealed poorer performance on both the MMSE and BPRS for patients when compared with controls. Patients taking olanzapine were impaired in learning the PCL but not the IGT when compared with controls. Results suggest that olanzapine acts on the PFC to augment IGT performance but further studies are needed.

Subjects/Keywords: Schizophrenia; Atypical Anti-Psychotic; Multiple Memory Systems; Non-Declarative Memory; Aripiprazole; Olanzapine; Risperidone; Neuroscience

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APA (6th Edition):

Steel, R. (2013). Multiple Memory Systems in People With Schizophrenia: Possible Effect of Atypical Anti-Psychotic Medications . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/8119

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steel, Ryland. “Multiple Memory Systems in People With Schizophrenia: Possible Effect of Atypical Anti-Psychotic Medications .” 2013. Thesis, Queens University. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/8119.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steel, Ryland. “Multiple Memory Systems in People With Schizophrenia: Possible Effect of Atypical Anti-Psychotic Medications .” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Steel R. Multiple Memory Systems in People With Schizophrenia: Possible Effect of Atypical Anti-Psychotic Medications . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/8119.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Steel R. Multiple Memory Systems in People With Schizophrenia: Possible Effect of Atypical Anti-Psychotic Medications . [Thesis]. Queens University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/8119

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kent State University

2. Igah, Madonna Onyinyechukwu. An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications.

Degree: PhD, College of Public Health, 2018, Kent State University

Persons taking antipsychotic medications are disproportionately overweight, which may well be influenced by social factors. The objective of this study is to characterize the relationships between social support, lifestyle habit relating to diet and physical activity, and weight status among persons who have initiated psychiatric pharmacological treatment.This is a secondary analysis of data from the Community Mental Health Research Initiative in Northeast Ohio. Self-report data from a probability subgroup sample (n=55) of a larger research initiative (N = 203), inclusive of men and women over the age of 20 who are currently taking psychiatric medication were analyzed. Logistic Regression modeling was performed to examine the associations between social support from friends, lifestyle habit, and the odds of being overweight. Social support holds as an important component when considering weight status among persons who have experienced or are at risk for experiencing weight gain induced by psychiatric medications such as antipsychotics, as unsatisfactory social support from friends showed a significant association with overweight status. Results from this study indicate a need for greater efforts to improve social support for persons who have undergone antipsychotic treatment, with emphasis placed on perceived satisfaction with support from friendships. Advisors/Committee Members: Jefferis, Eric (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Public Health; Mental Health; Anti-psychotic; Psychiatric; Psychotropic; Medication; Overweight; Obesity; Social Support; Weight Status; Public Health; Mental Health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Igah, M. O. (2018). An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Igah, Madonna Onyinyechukwu. “An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Igah, Madonna Onyinyechukwu. “An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications.” 2018. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Igah MO. An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535.

Council of Science Editors:

Igah MO. An Analysis of Social Support and Weight Status among Persons Taking Antipsychotic Medications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1541971432616535


McMaster University

3. Sookram, Christal D. Anti-Psychotic Drug Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Role for the Anti-Apoptotic Molecule Curcumin.

Degree: PhD, 2013, McMaster University

Anti-psychotic drug (APD) administration can induce movement disorders including tardive dyskinesia (TD), characterized by abnormal movements of the oro-facial region and occasionally the trunk and limbs. The most widely accepted model of TD is the APD-induced vacuous chewing movement (VCM). While the mechanism of induction of TD remains unclear, there are two prevailing hypothesis: oxidative stress and dopamine supersensitivity. Currently available APDs antagonize dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) which can result in excessive dopamine accumulation and oxidation which was demonstrated to induce striatal neurodegeneration and increased oxidative stress. The dopamine supersensitivity hypothesis proposes that APD treatment causes an up-regulation of high affinity D2Rs to compensate for D2R antagonism. Curcumin, a derivative of turmeric, has been demonstrated to affect dopamine levels and hold significant anti-apoptotic potential. Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate curcumin’s potential to prevent haloperidol-induced behavioural and biochemical abnormalities. Four groups of rats were treated daily: control; haloperidol (at 2mg/kg intra-peritoneally); curcumin (at 200mg/kg orally in jello) and curcumin plus haloperidol. VCMs, catalepsy and locomotor activity were assessed. Animals were sacrificed and tissues removed for qPCR, immunoblot, receptor binding, and UPLC assessments. At day14 there was a significant increase in VCMs and catalepsy following haloperidol treatment, which was prevented by curcumin treatment. However, curcumin did not alter locomotor activity. Curcumin was demonstrated to increase the expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule BclXL and to increase striatal D2Rs. These investigations support the potential of curcumin in the prevention of TD and provide insight into the complex pathophysiology of this disorder.

Doctor of Philosophy (Medical Science)

Advisors/Committee Members: Mishra, Ram, Medical Sciences (Neurosciences).

Subjects/Keywords: TARDIVE DYSKINESIA; ANTI-PSYCHOTIC DRUGS; VACUOUS CHEWING MOVEMENT; CATALEPSY; LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY; CURCUMIN; BclXL; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Medical Neurobiology; Medical Pharmacology; Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Medicine and Health Sciences; Musculoskeletal, Neural, and Ocular Physiology; Natural Products Chemistry and Pharmacognosy; Neurosciences; Pharmaceutical Preparations; Psychiatric and Mental Health; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sookram, C. D. (2013). Anti-Psychotic Drug Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Role for the Anti-Apoptotic Molecule Curcumin. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13488

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sookram, Christal D. “Anti-Psychotic Drug Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Role for the Anti-Apoptotic Molecule Curcumin.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13488.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sookram, Christal D. “Anti-Psychotic Drug Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Role for the Anti-Apoptotic Molecule Curcumin.” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Sookram CD. Anti-Psychotic Drug Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Role for the Anti-Apoptotic Molecule Curcumin. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13488.

Council of Science Editors:

Sookram CD. Anti-Psychotic Drug Induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Role for the Anti-Apoptotic Molecule Curcumin. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/13488

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