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You searched for subject:(Anti depressant). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Chittenden, Rosemary. Investigating the modulation of methylphenidate’s effects on impulsivity by fluoxetine.

Degree: 2015, Victoria University of Wellington

The co-prescribing of methylphenidate (MPH) and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for patients presenting co-morbidly with both attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and depression or anxiety is in some cases recommended. Little research has been conducted on the specific cognitive and behavioural outcomes of this. Studies with rats have shown that SSRI’s potentiate MPH-induced dopamine release in the pre-frontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, as well as enhancing MPH-induced hyper-locomotion (Borycz, Zapata, Quiroz, Volkow, & Ferré, 2008; Weikop, Yoshitake, & Kehr, 2007b). Impulsivity is a behavioural construct with dissociable sub-types, of which one, ‘action restraint’, has been consistently shown to be associated with increased dopamine activity in the mesolimbic system, including the nucleus accumbens. It was hypothesised that rats would make more ‘no-go’ errors in a Go/No-Go task, indicative of an increase in ‘action restraint’ type impulsivity, when co-administered fluoxetine (FLX) and MPH compared to either drug administered alone. Although this was not shown in the current study, tentative evidence was found to suggest that the combination of these drugs may negatively impact on attention, based on a decrease in ‘go’ accuracy. A second subtype of impulsivity, “action cancellation”, was tested using a new variant of the Stop-Signal Reaction Time (SSRT) task that we have developed for rats. Studies show that this subtype of impulsivity seems to be unaffected by changes in dopamine activity, but is improved by increases in norepinephrine. In the Weikop study mentioned above, the SSRI citalopram enhanced not only MPH-induced dopamine release, but also norepinephrine release in the nucleus accumbens. Thus it was hypothesised that FLX may potentiate MPH’s impulsivity-reducing effects as measured by stopping latency in the SSRT. We were not able to show this in the current study, however the demonstration that lower doses of MPH reduced stopping latency, consistent with previous versions of the SSRT, validated the new version developed for the current study. A final experiment revealed a rapid, short-term increase in locomotor activity when rats were co-administered FLX and MPH, an effect not present when either drug was administered singly. This synergistic effect replicates previous findings, and indicates a potentiation of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, as was found in previous studies. Although FLX was not found to moderate MPH’s effects on impulsivity in the current study, synergistic effects of the two drugs were effects were found on motor activity and potentially on attention also. This is an indication of the value of further research into specific behavioural and cognitive process that may be affected by co-administration of MPH and an SSRI. Advisors/Committee Members: Harper, David, Ellenbroek, Bart.

Subjects/Keywords: Impulsivity; Methylphenidate; Fluoxetine; Anti-depressant; Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; ADHD; Locomotor activity

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APA (6th Edition):

Chittenden, R. (2015). Investigating the modulation of methylphenidate’s effects on impulsivity by fluoxetine. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5316

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chittenden, Rosemary. “Investigating the modulation of methylphenidate’s effects on impulsivity by fluoxetine.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5316.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chittenden, Rosemary. “Investigating the modulation of methylphenidate’s effects on impulsivity by fluoxetine.” 2015. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Chittenden R. Investigating the modulation of methylphenidate’s effects on impulsivity by fluoxetine. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5316.

Council of Science Editors:

Chittenden R. Investigating the modulation of methylphenidate’s effects on impulsivity by fluoxetine. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5316


Montana Tech

2. Greene, Susan. The effect of female priming on male Betta splendens.

Degree: MA, 2018, Montana Tech

Male betta fish are naturally aggressive to attract a mate and defend a territory. This makes them a good model for studying aggression and choice behavior. This study looked at male Betta splendens aggressive nature when impacted by priming with a female and exposure to the SSRI drug fluoxetine. Males in the study received a prime before each choice trial, and the latency for each choice was measured and analyzed. We found no significant differences for preference for a mirror versus a non-mirror trail, or latency for choice for the mirror. However, a significant effect was found for fighting data, with primed males displaying more aggressive behavior than the males who were not primed. Another significant effect was also found, showing males exposed to fluoxetine had higher latencies for non-mirror trials than those not exposed to fluoxetine. This provides support for the hypothesis that the drug could impact motor movements and decrease arousal.

Subjects/Keywords: betta; aggression; anti-depressant; Fluoxetine; priming; Arts and Humanities; Medicine and Health Sciences; Social and Behavioral Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Greene, S. (2018). The effect of female priming on male Betta splendens. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11205

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Greene, Susan. “The effect of female priming on male Betta splendens.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11205.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Greene, Susan. “The effect of female priming on male Betta splendens.” 2018. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Greene S. The effect of female priming on male Betta splendens. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11205.

Council of Science Editors:

Greene S. The effect of female priming on male Betta splendens. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 2018. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11205

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