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You searched for subject:(Anodized Titanium). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Sirivisoot, Sirinrath. Engineered Implantable Nanotechnology Sensor and Electrically-Controlled Release of Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Using Polypyrrole Films Electrodeposited on Titanium for Orthopedic Implants.

Degree: PhD, Division of Engineering. Electrical Sciences and Computer Engineering, 2009, Brown University

The development of electrochemical sensors and responsive drug delivery systems are current challenges in the field of orthopedics. Micro and nanotechnology enable the development of dynamic systems that integrate an external signal in response to a biological environment within a living system. This research included the development and examination of: (i) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown out of anodized nanotubular titanium (MWCNT-Ti) to sense bone growth, biofilm formation, or scar tissue growth next to an implant in situ, and (ii) a biodegradable and electroactive conductive polymer (polypyrrole, PPy) to deliver antibiotic (penicillin/streptomycin) and anti-inflammatory (dexamethasone) drugs through the application of voltage to increase implant efficacy based on information from (i). Importantly, MWCNT-Ti enhanced the redox reaction of ferri/ferrocyanide and of the proteins synthesized by osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) remaining cytocompatible with osteoblasts and even enhancing osteoblast differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition) after 21 days of culture in vitro when compared to anodized nanotubular Ti and commercially pure Ti. Penicillin/streptomycin (P/S) and dexamethasone (Dex) were embedded simultaneously during the electrodeposition of PPy films on such materials. The PPy doped drugs enhanced osteoblast adhesion and proliferation, in vitro, whereas they inhibited fibroblast (fibrous-tissue forming cells) adhesion and proliferation when compared to conventional Ti. Both drugs (P/S and Dex) were released at about 80% of their initial concentration into PBS buffer after applying 5 cycles of cyclic voltammetry (CV) from -1 V to 1 V with scan rate of 100 mV/s. The bioactivity of P/S and Dex was confirmed by analyzing bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and macrophages (inflammatory and immune-response cells) functions in vitro, before and after electrically-triggered release. After 5 CV cycles, the P/S releases decreased the number of Staphylococcus epidermidis after 1 and 12 hours, while the Dex releases decreased the macrophage adhesion after 8 and 13 hours. Results showed that MWCNTs and conductive PPy were cytocompatibility with osteoblasts, and that these conducting bio-nanomaterials can be integrated with electronic devices for the development of an implantable closed-loop sensing and therapeutic system for orthopedic applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Webster, Thomas (director), Hurt, Robert (reader), Sun, Shouheng (reader), Mathiowitz, Edith (reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Anodized Titanium

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sirivisoot, S. (2009). Engineered Implantable Nanotechnology Sensor and Electrically-Controlled Release of Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Using Polypyrrole Films Electrodeposited on Titanium for Orthopedic Implants. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:169/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sirivisoot, Sirinrath. “Engineered Implantable Nanotechnology Sensor and Electrically-Controlled Release of Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Using Polypyrrole Films Electrodeposited on Titanium for Orthopedic Implants.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed March 23, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:169/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sirivisoot, Sirinrath. “Engineered Implantable Nanotechnology Sensor and Electrically-Controlled Release of Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Using Polypyrrole Films Electrodeposited on Titanium for Orthopedic Implants.” 2009. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Sirivisoot S. Engineered Implantable Nanotechnology Sensor and Electrically-Controlled Release of Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Using Polypyrrole Films Electrodeposited on Titanium for Orthopedic Implants. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2009. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:169/.

Council of Science Editors:

Sirivisoot S. Engineered Implantable Nanotechnology Sensor and Electrically-Controlled Release of Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Using Polypyrrole Films Electrodeposited on Titanium for Orthopedic Implants. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2009. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:169/


University of Akron

2. Paul, Arindam. EXTRINSIC INFLUENCE OF COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE RESPONSE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF THREE HIGH STRENGTH METALS.

Degree: MSin Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 2016, University of Akron

In recent years, starting with the early 1980’s, the use of protective coatings on the surface of a material chosen for use in a specific structure or component has been shown to be an economically affordable and potentially viable alternative to improve and/or enhance the mechanical properties of a material, enhance the resistance to environment-induced degradation or corrosion, and even offer enhanced resistance to wear. In this research study the extrinsic influence of surface treatment, referred to as “HEMF”, on tensile properties and resultant fracture behavior of three metals, a viable selection for use in a spectrum of high performance applications, was conducted with care and caution. “HEMF” is referred to the surface-treatment process wherein fine objects, microscopic in dimension, are made to impact with surface of the chosen specimen at a very high speed and force. Test results reveal that the innovative surface treatment did increase the yield strength, tensile strength and ductility of the chosen stainless steel 17-4PH. However the surface treatment was observed to have an adverse influence on both strength and ductility of the chosen aluminum alloy 7075-T6. For alloy steel 300M both the yield strength and tensile strength decreased for the longitudinal orientation but revealed an increase in the transverse orientation. Surface preparation was observed to have a detrimental influence on ductility of the alloy steel 300M. Kinetics governing tensile response and fracture behavior, at both the macroscopic and fine microscopic levels, will be highlighted in light of nature of loading, presence of surface treatment and intrinsic microstructural effects. Coating that is preferentially chosen for purpose of improving the corrosion resistance of metals when exposed to aggressive environments. In this research study the results of chromium nitride, ferritic nitro carburized and titanium anodized coatings was used as a surface coating on three widely chosen and used metal alloys tested both on air and after hydrogen exposure is presented and briefly discussed. The three metals chosen were 17-4 PH stainless steel, a high strength alloy steel (300M) and a high strength aluminum alloy (7075). Results showing the effect of the coatings on the tensile properties of the metal alloys tested on two different environment are discussed below. Advisors/Committee Members: Srivatsan, Tirumalai (Advisor), Doll, Gary (Committee Co-Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Metallurgy; Mechanical Engineering; Materials Science; tensile response, tensile fracture surface, SEM, chromium nitride, ferritic nitro carburized, titanium anodized, HEMF, Hydrogen exposure

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APA (6th Edition):

Paul, A. (2016). EXTRINSIC INFLUENCE OF COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE RESPONSE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF THREE HIGH STRENGTH METALS. (Masters Thesis). University of Akron. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=akron1470404392

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Paul, Arindam. “EXTRINSIC INFLUENCE OF COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE RESPONSE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF THREE HIGH STRENGTH METALS.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Akron. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=akron1470404392.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Paul, Arindam. “EXTRINSIC INFLUENCE OF COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE RESPONSE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF THREE HIGH STRENGTH METALS.” 2016. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Paul A. EXTRINSIC INFLUENCE OF COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE RESPONSE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF THREE HIGH STRENGTH METALS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Akron; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=akron1470404392.

Council of Science Editors:

Paul A. EXTRINSIC INFLUENCE OF COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE RESPONSE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF THREE HIGH STRENGTH METALS. [Masters Thesis]. University of Akron; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=akron1470404392

3. Ayyala Somayajula, Dilip. Biocompatibility of osteoblast cells on titanium implants.

Degree: MSin Chemical Engineering, Fenn College of Engineering, 2008, Cleveland State University

Adhesion and proliferation of UMR 106-01 osteoblast cells were studied on various surface modified titanium materials such as polished, sandblasted, anodized and alkaline treated. Anodization of polished surface in Hydrofluoric acid developed nano-tubes, while NaOH treatment produced spongy microporous morphology. Test samples were coated with non-adhesive protein bovine serum albumin and compared with fibronectin coated specimens. The adhesion study lasted for 4 hrs, where osteoblast cells were cultured in serum free medium. Polished titanium, anodized titanium and NaOH titanium have shown similar percentages of cell adherence. The proliferation study lasted for 48 hrs, where cells were initially allowed to adhere to the surface in serum free medium for 4 hrs, followed by a medium change to 10% fatal bovine serum. The specific growth rate after 48 hrs in culture on the polished surface was found to be comparable to the tissue culture plastic, which exhibited a high growth rate. No significant difference was found in cell numbers between polished, anodized and NaOH-Ti, but each has varying cell orientation on the surface. Fluorescence images stained with alkaline phosphatase revealed that polished surface had cells flattened to the surface with short filapodia. Anodized surface had cells uniformly distributed across the surface where as NaOH-Ti displayed cells in colonies. Cells were found bonding to the surface of NaOH-Ti firmly using their filapodia as an anchoring agent. These results suggest that NaOH-Ti provides support in initial hours of implantation and bolsters cell proliferation. All together this process may help to better integrate titanium implant surfaces. Advisors/Committee Members: Belovich, Joanne (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical Research; Chemical Engineering; Dental Care; Materials Science; UMR 106-01; osteoblast cells; titanium; polished titanium; polished and anodized titanium; polished and NaOH treated titanium

…30 Figure 8. SEM image of polished and anodized titanium… …43 Figure 13. Fluorescent images of polished and anodized titanium… …sandblasted and anodized treated titanium… …anodized titanium… …51 (c) Image showing DAPI staining of polished, sandblasted and anodized titanium… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ayyala Somayajula, D. (2008). Biocompatibility of osteoblast cells on titanium implants. (Masters Thesis). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1207322725

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ayyala Somayajula, Dilip. “Biocompatibility of osteoblast cells on titanium implants.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Cleveland State University. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1207322725.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ayyala Somayajula, Dilip. “Biocompatibility of osteoblast cells on titanium implants.” 2008. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ayyala Somayajula D. Biocompatibility of osteoblast cells on titanium implants. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1207322725.

Council of Science Editors:

Ayyala Somayajula D. Biocompatibility of osteoblast cells on titanium implants. [Masters Thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1207322725

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