Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Anglo Protestants). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Southern California

1. Perez, Haven Abraham. How Evangelicals are born-again and again: race, ethnicity, religion and politics in American culture.

Degree: PhD, American Studies and Ethnicity, 2014, University of Southern California

Since 1976, there has been a deluge of research on Evangelicals. This group has been conceptualized in various ways. In fact, a multitude of portraits create this American religious identity (Hackett and Lindsay, 2008). Despite lack of consensus over the meaning and definition associated with the term Evangelical, the Evangelical label is powerful. The term is evoked frequently in political discourse and public policy, and often yields a strong emotional and intellectual response. And yet the term Evangelical has proven difficult to pin down. As a result, the demographic and religious characteristics of Evangelicals in the United States are frequently inconsistent and contradictory. For example, studies have estimated that the adult evangelical population in the United States is as small as 7 percent and as large as 47 percent (Gallup and Lindsay, 1999). This dissertation will demonstrate how and why there are such vast inconsistencies in the way Evangelicals are conceptualized, focusing on a synthesis of academic historical narratives of Anglo‐Protestant ethnic identity in the United States and the historical narratives of modern Evangelicals in the pews. In addition, I reflect on the meaning of the term Evangelical by drawing on my own personal history and experience. ❧ To understand the term Evangelical in the United States requires a review of the history of Protestantism in this country. A study of Protestantism must also engage with White Anglo‐Saxon Protestant identity. In this dissertation I argue that the meaning of the term Evangelical is contingent on historical trends and socio‐political events within Anglo‐Protestant identity, including conflicts concerning how to interpret these historical narratives. Advisors/Committee Members: Wong, Janelle (Committee Chair), Jacobs, Lanita (Committee Member), Miller, Donald Earl (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Evangelicalism; Evangelicals; Protestants; Protestantism; ethno‐nationalism; Anglo‐Protestants; WASP; religious identity

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Perez, H. A. (2014). How Evangelicals are born-again and again: race, ethnicity, religion and politics in American culture. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/365792/rec/3245

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Perez, Haven Abraham. “How Evangelicals are born-again and again: race, ethnicity, religion and politics in American culture.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/365792/rec/3245.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Perez, Haven Abraham. “How Evangelicals are born-again and again: race, ethnicity, religion and politics in American culture.” 2014. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Perez HA. How Evangelicals are born-again and again: race, ethnicity, religion and politics in American culture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/365792/rec/3245.

Council of Science Editors:

Perez HA. How Evangelicals are born-again and again: race, ethnicity, religion and politics in American culture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/365792/rec/3245


Boston College

2. Tanis, Bethany. The “Great Church Crisis,” Public Life, and National Identity in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain.

Degree: PhD, History, 2009, Boston College

This dissertation explores the social, cultural, and political effects of the “Great Church Crisis,” a conflict between the Protestant and Anglo-Catholic (or Ritualist) parties within the Church of England occurring between 1898 and 1906. Through a series of case studies, including an examination of the role of religious controversy in fin-de-siècle Parliamentary politics, it shows that religious belief and practice were more important in turn-of-the-century Britain than has been appreciated. The argument that the onset of secularization in Britain as defined by both a decline in religious attendance and personal belief can be pushed back until at least the 1920s or 1930s is not new. Yet, the insight that religious belief and practice remained a constituent part of late-Victorian and Edwardian national identity and public life has thus far failed to penetrate political, social, and cultural histories of the period. This dissertation uses the Great Church Crisis to explore the interaction between religious belief and political and social behavior, not with the intent of reducing religion to an expression of political and social stimuli, but with the goal of illuminating the ways politics, culture, and social thought functioned as bearers of religious concerns. The intense anti-Catholicism unleashed by the Church Crisis triggered debate about British national identity, Erastianism, and the nature of the church-state relationship. Since the Reformation, Erastians – supporters of full state control of the church – and proponents of a more independent church had argued over how to define the proper relationship between the national church and state. This dissertation demonstrates that the Church Crisis represents a crucial period in the history of church-state relations because the eventual Anglo-Catholic victory ended Parliamentary attempts to control the church’s theology and practice and, therefore, sounded the death knell of political Erastianism. In short, tensions between Protestant and Catholics reached a high water mark during the years of the Great Church Crisis. These tensions catalyzed both a temporary revival of Erastianism and its ultimate descent into irrelevance. Advisors/Committee Members: Peter Weiler (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Great Church Crisis; Church of England; Protestants; Anglo-Catholics

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tanis, B. (2009). The “Great Church Crisis,” Public Life, and National Identity in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101671

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tanis, Bethany. “The “Great Church Crisis,” Public Life, and National Identity in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101671.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tanis, Bethany. “The “Great Church Crisis,” Public Life, and National Identity in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain.” 2009. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Tanis B. The “Great Church Crisis,” Public Life, and National Identity in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2009. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101671.

Council of Science Editors:

Tanis B. The “Great Church Crisis,” Public Life, and National Identity in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2009. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101671

.