Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Always Coming Home). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Saskatchewan

1. Brady, Carleigh. Fractional Prefigurations : Science Fiction, Utopia, and Narrative Form.

Degree: 2014, University of Saskatchewan

The literary utopia is often accused of being an outmoded genre, a graveyard for failed social movements. However, utopian literature is a surprisingly resilient genre, evolving from the static, descriptive anatomies of the Renaissance utopias to the novelized utopian romances of the late nineteenth century and the self-reflexive critical utopias of the 1970s. The literary utopia adapts to the needs of the moment: what form(s) best represent the fears and desires of our current historical period? In this dissertation I perform a close reading of three exemplary texts: John Brunner’s Stand on Zanzibar (1968), Ursula K. Le Guin’s Always Coming Home (1985), and David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas (2004). While I address topics specific to each text, my main focus is on the texts’ depictions of utopia and their spatialized narrative forms. In Stand on Zanzibar Brunner locates the utopian impulse in three registers—the political/bureaucratic, the technical/scientific, and the human(e)—and explores how their interplay constitutes the utopian space. In Always Coming Home Le Guin renovates the classical literary utopia, problematizing its uncritical advocacy of the “Judaeo-Christian-Rationalist-West” but preserving much of the older utopia’s form. In Cloud Atlas the networked narrative structure reflects and enables the heterogeneous, non-hierarchical, and processual utopian communities depicted in the novel. In these science fictional works the spatialized techniques of juxtaposition, discontinuity, and collage —commonly associated with a loss of historical depth and difference—are used to create utopian spaces founded on contingency and human choice. I contend that science fiction is a historical genre, one that is invested in representing societies as contingent historical totalities. Science fiction’s generic tendencies modify the context that a spatialized narrative form functions in, and in changing the context changes its effects. By utilizing a spatialized narrative form to embody a contingent practice, Brunner, Le Guin, and Mitchell cast the future—and the present—as historical, as something that can be acted upon and changed: they have provided us with strategies for envisioning better futures and, potentially, for mobilizing our visions of the future for positive change in the present. Advisors/Committee Members: Hynes, Peter, Roy, Wendy, Thorpe, Doug, Lieverse, Angela, Ruddick, Nicholas.

Subjects/Keywords: John Brunner; Stand on Zanzibar; Ursula K. Le Guin; Always Coming Home; David Mitchell; Cloud Atlas; science fiction; utopia; narrative form

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brady, C. (2014). Fractional Prefigurations : Science Fiction, Utopia, and Narrative Form. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-06-1808

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brady, Carleigh. “Fractional Prefigurations : Science Fiction, Utopia, and Narrative Form.” 2014. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-06-1808.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brady, Carleigh. “Fractional Prefigurations : Science Fiction, Utopia, and Narrative Form.” 2014. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Brady C. Fractional Prefigurations : Science Fiction, Utopia, and Narrative Form. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-06-1808.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Brady C. Fractional Prefigurations : Science Fiction, Utopia, and Narrative Form. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-06-1808

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Montana Tech

2. Fine, Kerry. COMMUNITY, BODY, AND LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION OF PLACE IN MOLLY GLOSS’S THE DAZZLE OF DAY AND URSULA K. LE GUIN’S ALWAYS COMING HOME.

Degree: MA, 2012, Montana Tech

In this thesis I use ecofeminist environmental ethics and phenomenological place theory to examine the sense of place created by Molly Gloss in The Dazzle of Day (1997) and by Ursula K. Le Guin in Always Coming Home (1985). Ecofiction narratives, such as Dazzle and Always, are particularly important because they allow us to explore potentially unexamined relationships of unjustified domination between human communities and the environments in which they are situated. Additionally, these narratives also allow us to imagine what nontraditional ethical systems might look like in practice. Both novels attend quite closely to the notion of self-in-relation, particularly as it pertains to the environment. By investigating the ways that the human communities created by Gloss and Le Guin interact with the nonhuman environment we can identify important ethical positions that vary from potentially environmentally destructive ethical systems such as utilitarianism and contractarianism. In particular, these communities reflect an ecofeminist ethics of flourishing. In addition to their particular ethical stances, the novels also reveal the mutual importance of environments and the bodies that inhabit them in constructing sense of place. The complex interactions of the physical landscape, human bodies, and the assumptions that humans bring to places all come together to create what we call place. The ways in which epistemology is shaped by place also influences this interaction. The physical conditions of place influence how we come to know what we know; the ways in which our perception develops is influenced by the environments in which we live, and as these environments change so to do our ways of thinking. Gloss and Le Guin create within their narratives complex and dynamic worlds capable of not only foreshadowing possible ecological ruin for our own world but also of imagining possible escape from such a future. Their works allow us to reimagine ecological relationships and create new possibilities.

Subjects/Keywords: Always Coming Home; Chris Cuomo; Christopher Preston; Ecofeminism; Ecofeminist Ethics; Edward Casey; Ethic of Flourishing; Karen J. Warren; Molly Gloss; Phenomenology; Sense of Place; The Dazzle of Day; Ursula K. Le Guin; Val Plumwood

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fine, K. (2012). COMMUNITY, BODY, AND LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION OF PLACE IN MOLLY GLOSS’S THE DAZZLE OF DAY AND URSULA K. LE GUIN’S ALWAYS COMING HOME. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/220

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fine, Kerry. “COMMUNITY, BODY, AND LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION OF PLACE IN MOLLY GLOSS’S THE DAZZLE OF DAY AND URSULA K. LE GUIN’S ALWAYS COMING HOME.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/220.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fine, Kerry. “COMMUNITY, BODY, AND LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION OF PLACE IN MOLLY GLOSS’S THE DAZZLE OF DAY AND URSULA K. LE GUIN’S ALWAYS COMING HOME.” 2012. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Fine K. COMMUNITY, BODY, AND LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION OF PLACE IN MOLLY GLOSS’S THE DAZZLE OF DAY AND URSULA K. LE GUIN’S ALWAYS COMING HOME. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 2012. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/220.

Council of Science Editors:

Fine K. COMMUNITY, BODY, AND LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION OF PLACE IN MOLLY GLOSS’S THE DAZZLE OF DAY AND URSULA K. LE GUIN’S ALWAYS COMING HOME. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 2012. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/220


University of British Columbia

3. Clark, Edith Ilse Victoria. Ursula K. Le Guin : the utopias and dystopias of The dispossessed and Always coming come.

Degree: MA- MA, English, 1987, University of British Columbia

The thesis deals with the Utopian and dystopian aspects of Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed and Always Coming Home. To provide a basis for comparison with the endeavours of previous utopists, the first part is devoted to a historical account of literary Utopias, and to an examination of the signposts of the genre. This history is restricted to practical blueprints for the ideal commonwealth and excludes creations of pure fantasy. In tracing Utopian development from Plato to Wells, the influence of historical events and the mainstreams of thought, such as Renaissance humanism, the Reformation, the rising importance of science, the discovery of new lands, the Enlightenment, Locke's Theory of Perfectability, Bentham's utilitarianism, the Industrial Revolution, socialism, the French Revolution, Darwinism, and the conflict between capital and labour is demonstrated. It is also shown how the long-range results of the Russian Revolution and the two world wars shattered all Utopian visions, leading to the emergence of the dystopia, and how the author reversed this negative trend in the second part of the twentieth century. In a study of forms of Utopian presentation, the claim is made that The Dispossessed features the first Utopia that qualifies as a novel: not only does the author break with the genre's tradition of subordinating the characters to the proposal, she also creates the conflict necessary for novelistic structure by juxtaposing her positive societies with negative ones. In part two, the Utopias and dystopias of both books are examined, and their features compared to previous endeavours in the genre. The observation is made that although the author favours anarchism as a political theory, she is more deeply committed to the Chinese philosophy of Taoism, seeing in its ideals the only way to a harmonious and just existence for all. In order to prove her point, Le Guin renders her Utopias less than perfect, placing one society into an inhospitable environment and showing the other as suffering from genetic damage; this suggests that the ideal life does not rest in societal organization or beneficent surroundings, but in the minds of the inhabitants: this frame of mind—if not inherent in a culture—can be achieved by living in accordance with the tao. Lastly, an effort is made to determine the anthropological models upon which Utopian proposals are constructed. The theory is put forth that all non-governed, egalitarian Utopias represent a return to the societal arrangements of early man, when his communities were still small and decentralized, and before occupational specialization began to set in; that all democratic forms of government are taken from the Greek examples, that More's Utopia might well have been modelled on the Athenian clans of the pre-Cleisthenes era, and that the Kesh society of Always Coming Home is based exclusively on the kinship systems of the Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest.

Subjects/Keywords: Dystopias in literature; Utopias in literature; Le Guin, Ursula K., 1929- Always coming home; Le Guin, Ursula K., 1929- Dispossessed

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clark, E. I. V. (1987). Ursula K. Le Guin : the utopias and dystopias of The dispossessed and Always coming come. (Masters Thesis). University of British Columbia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2429/26801

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clark, Edith Ilse Victoria. “Ursula K. Le Guin : the utopias and dystopias of The dispossessed and Always coming come.” 1987. Masters Thesis, University of British Columbia. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2429/26801.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clark, Edith Ilse Victoria. “Ursula K. Le Guin : the utopias and dystopias of The dispossessed and Always coming come.” 1987. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Clark EIV. Ursula K. Le Guin : the utopias and dystopias of The dispossessed and Always coming come. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of British Columbia; 1987. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/26801.

Council of Science Editors:

Clark EIV. Ursula K. Le Guin : the utopias and dystopias of The dispossessed and Always coming come. [Masters Thesis]. University of British Columbia; 1987. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/26801

.