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You searched for subject:(Alva Noe). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Queens University

1. Watson, Amanda. Seeing Other People: An Enactivist Account of Hallucination as Perceptual Error .

Degree: Philosophy, Queens University

In this essay, I explore the difference between Representational Theories of Content (RTC) and Embodied Enactivism, and argue that enactivist approaches of perception can account for hallucinatory experiences, a sensory phenomenon readily explained by the RTC approaches. RTC bases perceptual activity on the presence of representational features interpreted by the brain, and are defined by their relation to independently existing objects. The enactivist model uses success and failure to determine whether or not a perception is hallucinatory by appealing to the use of all of the body’s sensory modalities to navigate a perceptual error. In Chapter two I present my arguments for an enactivist theory of hallucination, first by demonstrating that illusion and hallucination, broadly thought of as being two radically different phenomena, are actually one and the same. I also demonstrate how it is that bodily experiences affect the type of hallucination a patient will have, appealing to mood, repetitive tasks, and current environmental presences. My last strategy cleaves a wedge between visual imagery and hallucination, an assumption often made by representationalist accounts of cognition. RTC arguments made to support visual imagery are used to demonstrate how hallucinations are representational, but if the two experiences are actually different, then arguments for visual imagery become less convincing. Chapter three focuses on some lingering concerns and interesting implications of the enactivist theory. Veridicality differs from successful/failed perceptions by appealing to the degree with which the agent can make sense of their perceptions. I also argue how smaller misperceptions are hallucinatory, as well as how auditory hallucinations and multi-modal halluciations are also explainable to the enactivist. Dreams pose the last challenge I address, for they exhibit some embodied characteristics all the while being impervious to the success/failure metric of perceptual activity.

Subjects/Keywords: enactivism; philosophy; Maurice Merleau-Ponty; Alva Noe; hallucinations; perceptual error; illusion; perception; vision

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Watson, A. (n.d.). Seeing Other People: An Enactivist Account of Hallucination as Perceptual Error . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22693

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watson, Amanda. “Seeing Other People: An Enactivist Account of Hallucination as Perceptual Error .” Thesis, Queens University. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22693.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watson, Amanda. “Seeing Other People: An Enactivist Account of Hallucination as Perceptual Error .” Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Watson A. Seeing Other People: An Enactivist Account of Hallucination as Perceptual Error . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22693.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Watson A. Seeing Other People: An Enactivist Account of Hallucination as Perceptual Error . [Thesis]. Queens University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22693

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


University of Canterbury

2. Hart, M J Alexandra. Action in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an Enactive Psycho-phenomenological and Semiotic Analysis of Thirty New Zealand Women's Experiences of Suffering and Recovery.

Degree: Social and Political Sciences, 2010, University of Canterbury

This research into Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) presents the results of 60 first-person psycho-phenomenological interviews with 30 New Zealand women. The participants were recruited from the Canterbury and Wellington regions, 10 had recovered. Taking a non-dual, non-reductive embodied approach, the phenomenological data was analysed semiotically, using a graph-theoretical cluster analysis to elucidate the large number of resulting categories, and interpreted through the enactive approach to cognitive science. The initial result of the analysis is a comprehensive exploration of the experience of CFS which develops subject-specific categories of experience and explores the relation of the illness to universal categories of experience, including self, ‘energy’, action, and being-able-to-do. Transformations of the self surrounding being-able-to-do and not-being-able-to-do were shown to elucidate the illness process. It is proposed that the concept ‘energy’ in the participants’ discourse is equivalent to the Mahayana Buddhist concept of ‘contact’. This characterises CFS as a breakdown of contact. Narrative content from the recovered interviewees reflects a reestablishment of contact. The hypothesis that CFS is a disorder of action is investigated in detail. A general model for the phenomenology and functional architecture of action is proposed. This model is a recursive loop involving felt meaning, contact, action, and perception and appears to be phenomenologically supported. It is proposed that the CFS illness process is a dynamical decompensation of the subject’s action loop caused by a breakdown in the process of contact. On this basis, a new interpretation of neurological findings in relation to CFS becomes possible. A neurological phenomenon that correlates with the illness and involves a brain region that has a similar structure to the action model’s recursive loop is identified in previous research results and compared with the action model and the results of this research. This correspondence may identify the brain regions involved in the illness process, which may provide an objective diagnostic test for the condition and approaches to treatment. The implications of this model for cognitive science and CFS should be investigated through neurophenomenological research since the model stands to shed considerable light on the nature of consciousness, contact and agency. Phenomenologically based treatments are proposed, along with suggestions for future research on CFS. The research may clarify the diagnostic criteria for CFS and guide management and treatment programmes, particularly multidimensional and interdisciplinary approaches. Category theory is proposed as a foundation for a mathematisation of phenomenology.

Subjects/Keywords: action; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome; Myalgic Encephalomyelitis; Chronic Immune Deficiency Syndrome; Chronic Fatigue Immune Deficiency Syndrome; enaction; social enaction; social enactivism; enactive; psycho-phenomenological; psychophenomenological; vipassana; groundlessness; mind-body; korper; leib; co-generative; Focusing; co-creative; environment; Antonio Damasio; reciprocal constraints; Pierre Vermersch; Claire Petitmengin; Antione Lutz; narrative; discourse; phenomenal invariants; Evan Thompson; Merleau-Ponty; Algirdis Julien Greimas; Husserl; first-person; Fransisco Varela; modelling invariants; Natalie Depraz; isotope; John Boyd; OODA loop; Jonathan Shear; Shaun Gallagher; Arthur Kleinman; Humberto Maturana; second-person; Alva Noe; Dan Zahavi; stages; Embodied Mind; Canterbury; Wellington; New Zealand; non-dual; non-reductive embodied; phenomenological; third-person; graph-theoretical cluster analysis; cognitive science; experience; solution; subject-specific categories; universal categories; universal categories; self; energy; illness process; intersubjectivity; Mahayana Buddhism; contact; narrative; recovered; making sense; recursive loop; perception; dynamical decompensation; neurology; diagnosis; empathy; treatment; management; neurophenomenological; neurophenomenology; consciousness; veracity; agency; multidimensional; interdisciplinary; category theory; enculturation; mathematisation of phenomenology; interview; nomenclature; diagnostic criteria; incidence; prevalence; coping strategy; etiology; epidemiology; psychosomatic medicine; meaning; women; girl; female; anthropology; sociology; cognitive behavioral therapy; exercise therapy; recovery; mindful awareness; suffering; symbolisation; Prasangika; no-self; aggregates; wheel of karma; cognition; basic element analysis; mental factors; operational closure; stereotypes; enactive ontologically fragile self; grief; process-knowledge; epoche; phenomenal invariants; textual invariants; compound meaning; saturation; formalisation; cluster analysis; inter-session review; inter-individual validation; explicitation interview; intricacy; confidence; psychophenomenology; self-esteem; sanction; self dis-integration; permanence; continuity; ego-self; emotion; surrender; semiotic square; meditation; empathy; semiotic; compassion; existential feelings; goal obstruction; movement; transformation; change; somatic; Giovanna Colombetti; agoraphobia; panic; anxiety; psychotherapy; sleep; rest; pain; weakness; strength; stamina; Diego Cosmelli; heaviness; food; chemicals; allergy; recovering; despair; frustration; helplessness; fear; efference; valence; afference; as-if-body-loop; consciousness; representation; attention; recovery; intention; sustainable; sustainability; neurasthenia; existential feelings; asthenia; hysteria; mononucleosis; samatha-vispasnya; prajna; vijnana; Eugene Gendlin; Abhidharma; dukkha; shamatha; interdependence; vipashyana

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hart, M. J. A. (2010). Action in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an Enactive Psycho-phenomenological and Semiotic Analysis of Thirty New Zealand Women's Experiences of Suffering and Recovery. (Thesis). University of Canterbury. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10092/5294

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hart, M J Alexandra. “Action in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an Enactive Psycho-phenomenological and Semiotic Analysis of Thirty New Zealand Women's Experiences of Suffering and Recovery.” 2010. Thesis, University of Canterbury. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10092/5294.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hart, M J Alexandra. “Action in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an Enactive Psycho-phenomenological and Semiotic Analysis of Thirty New Zealand Women's Experiences of Suffering and Recovery.” 2010. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Hart MJA. Action in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an Enactive Psycho-phenomenological and Semiotic Analysis of Thirty New Zealand Women's Experiences of Suffering and Recovery. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/5294.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hart MJA. Action in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an Enactive Psycho-phenomenological and Semiotic Analysis of Thirty New Zealand Women's Experiences of Suffering and Recovery. [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/5294

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.