Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Alexander Gardner). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Brigham Young University

1. White, Katie Janae. The War That Does Not Leave Us: Memory of the American Civil War and the Photographs of Alexander Gardner.

Degree: MA, 2014, Brigham Young University

In July of 1863 the photographs A Harvest of Death, Field Where General Reynolds Fell, A Sharpshooter's Last Sleep, and The Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter were taken after the battle at Gettysburg by a team of photographers led by Alexander Gardner. In the decades that followed these images of the dead of the battlefield became some of the most iconic representations of the American Civil War. Today, Gardner's Gettysburg photographs can be found in almost every contemporary history text, documentary, or collection of images from the war, yet their journey to this iconic status has been little discussed. The goal of this thesis is to expand the general understanding of these Civil War photographs and their legacy by considering their use beyond the early 1860s. Although part of a larger scope of influence, the discussion of the photographs presented here will focus particularly on the years between 1894 and 1911. Between those years they were made available to the public through large photographic histories and other history texts as well. The aim of these texts, which framed and manipulated Gardner's images, were to disseminate a propagandistic history of the war in a way that outlined it as a nationally unifying experience, rather than one of division. These texts mark the beginning of the influence the Gettysburg photographs would have on American memory of the war. Within these books the four photographs became part of a larger effort to reconnect with the past and shape the war into a source for a unified American identity.

Subjects/Keywords: Alexander Gardner; battlefield photography; Gettysburg; American Civil War; turn of the century; photographic histories; American identity; memory; Art Practice

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, K. J. (2014). The War That Does Not Leave Us: Memory of the American Civil War and the Photographs of Alexander Gardner. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5113&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Katie Janae. “The War That Does Not Leave Us: Memory of the American Civil War and the Photographs of Alexander Gardner.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed September 25, 2020. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5113&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Katie Janae. “The War That Does Not Leave Us: Memory of the American Civil War and the Photographs of Alexander Gardner.” 2014. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

White KJ. The War That Does Not Leave Us: Memory of the American Civil War and the Photographs of Alexander Gardner. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5113&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

White KJ. The War That Does Not Leave Us: Memory of the American Civil War and the Photographs of Alexander Gardner. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2014. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5113&context=etd


Youngstown State University

2. Ruminski, Jarret. “A Terrible Fascination:” Civil War Photography and the Advent of Photographic Realism.

Degree: MAin History, Department of History, 2007, Youngstown State University

This thesis deals with the social, aesthetic, and historical significance of Civil War era photography, with special emphasis on Alexander Gardner’s photographs from the Battle of Antietam. My thesis argues that Antietam was a watershed moment in photography, for Gardner’s Antietam images represented the medium’s first step towards establishing its own unique photographic aesthetic. This new photographic aesthetic was firmly grounded in a literal realism that did not exist in other forms of representation, such as painting or engraving. This realism dispelled American ideological notions of God-sanctioned, pastoral innocence, and forced Americans to confront the savagery in their own midst. Apart from their aesthetic legacy, the Antietam images also gave birth to the separate medium of war photography, and represented the birth of photojournalism. Chapter one addresses the origins of photography, with particular emphasis on its connection to the nineteenth century aesthetic movement and its close relationship to portrait painting. Chapter two examines in-depth the most important photographs from the Battle of Antietam. By analyzing how the American public reacted to these images, this chapter reveals how Alexander Gardner’s photographs invalidated the aesthetic ideology of nineteenth century America. Chapter three examines some of Alexander Gardner’s most important photographs from the Gettysburg and Virginia campaigns of 1864 and 1865. It emphasizes Gardner’s drift from compositions depicting masses of battlefield casualties in favor of close-range, highly personalized images of individual corpses. The thesis concludes with the legacy of Gardner’s Civil War photographs by exploring their value as pieces of commemorative art that invoke the true memory of the Civil War. Advisors/Committee Members: Barnes, Diane (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: History, United States; Civil War photography history; Antietam, Battle of, Md., 1862; Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ruminski, J. (2007). “A Terrible Fascination:” Civil War Photography and the Advent of Photographic Realism. (Masters Thesis). Youngstown State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1194962162

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ruminski, Jarret. ““A Terrible Fascination:” Civil War Photography and the Advent of Photographic Realism.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Youngstown State University. Accessed September 25, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1194962162.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ruminski, Jarret. ““A Terrible Fascination:” Civil War Photography and the Advent of Photographic Realism.” 2007. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Ruminski J. “A Terrible Fascination:” Civil War Photography and the Advent of Photographic Realism. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Youngstown State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1194962162.

Council of Science Editors:

Ruminski J. “A Terrible Fascination:” Civil War Photography and the Advent of Photographic Realism. [Masters Thesis]. Youngstown State University; 2007. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1194962162

3. Stricker, Kirsten E. The Absence That Is Present: Civil War Photography. 1862-2015.

Degree: MA, Art/Art History, 2017, Bowling Green State University

In 1862, Alexander Gardner captured some of the best-known photographs of the Civil War at Antietam. Since then his photographs have been part of a varied history cycling from open publicity to obscurity and back again. In recent years, photographers have turned to Gardner’s photographs for inspiration when creating new photographs of the Civil War: rephotography. David Levene and Sally Mann are two examples that approach rephotography from different directions. Levene and Mann go to Antietam to photograph what the war left behind. The content of the photographs was analyzed to see what was present and what was not. The artists’ intent was taken into consideration where possible. The photographs represent the Civil War through what is absent, through what is missing. Gardner’s photographs depict the aftermath of the battle; Levene’s highlight what is there no longer; Mann’s explore the spectral traces that remain. They each commemorate Antietam while making September 17, 1862 more real for modern viewers. Advisors/Committee Members: Hershberger, Andrew (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: American History; Art History; Fine Arts; Alexander Gardner; Sally Mann; David Levene; photography; rephotographs; Civil War; Civil War photography; Antietam; absence; photographs; Civil War photographs; rephotography; Civil War rephotography; Civil War rephotographs

…Stricker 7 CHAPTER ONE: ALEXANDER GARDNER AND THE CIVIL WAR Since its inception photography has… …used in the new process, Mathew Brady (1822–1896), Alexander Gardner (1821… …to an Era: The Life and Photographs of Alexander Gardner, D. Mark Katz states: “There has… …Alexander Gardner Alexander Gardner, the photographer who captured the most iconic scenes of the… …Alexander Gardner (New York: Viking, 1991), 3–4. Stricker 14 Glasgow, in 1821.39 In… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stricker, K. E. (2017). The Absence That Is Present: Civil War Photography. 1862-2015. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1491567573460185

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stricker, Kirsten E. “The Absence That Is Present: Civil War Photography. 1862-2015.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed September 25, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1491567573460185.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stricker, Kirsten E. “The Absence That Is Present: Civil War Photography. 1862-2015.” 2017. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Stricker KE. The Absence That Is Present: Civil War Photography. 1862-2015. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1491567573460185.

Council of Science Editors:

Stricker KE. The Absence That Is Present: Civil War Photography. 1862-2015. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1491567573460185

.