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You searched for subject:(Airline Disruptions). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Beskow, Gregory John. Rescheduling of Airline Pilot Training Activities Following Disruptions.

Degree: Industrial and Systems Engineering, 2001, Virginia Tech

Public dependence on air transportation has grown to its largest point in history. Along with this increased dependence is a heightened awareness of safety concerns and the need for pilots to cover all scheduled flights. All commercial pilots are certified for the particular aircraft they are flying by satisfactorily completing a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved course. During the training course, a number of training devices are used including a Full Flight Simulator (FFS) and a Flight Training Device (FTD). The procurement, installation, operation, and maintenance costs of these devices are expensive. In addition, the amount of time pilots spend in training is costly because they continue to be paid their salary rate although they are unable to fly revenue-generating flights for the airline. Due to these high costs, training is scheduled very tightly, with the goals of maximizing training device utilization and minimizing the pilot's training footprint (time spent in training). Any disruption to the tight schedule, such as a simulator breakdown, or pilot illness, renders the original schedule obsolete and demands rescheduling of activities. In this research, the rescheduling problem is investigated through the development and application of several different rescheduling approaches. The problem is decomposed by first investigating a single resource model and insights gained from this experimentation are transferred to the multiple resource model. The solution approaches developed for experimentation include: right-shift rescheduling (RSR), rescheduling of affected activities (RAFF), and rescheduling of all activities (RALL). Performance measures used to compare the various approaches include the minimization of the pilot footprint, the minimization of pilot tardiness, and the minimization of the deviation that a revised schedule has from the original schedule. A case study and a series of experiments involving random disruptions to original schedules were used to analyze the solution approaches. For the data sets analyzed, the RAFF algorithm outperformed other methods with respect to the majority of the measure collected. Analysis performed on the amount of slack in the original schedule revealed that diminishing returns were observed beyond a certain level of slack. Further analysis on the impact of the location of this slack showed that the majority of the slack should be placed at the end of the schedule, or the slack should be dispersed almost evenly over the entire schedule. Advisors/Committee Members: Koelling, Charles Patrick (committee member), Ellis, Kimberly P. (committeecochair), Bish, Ebru K. (committeecochair).

Subjects/Keywords: rescheduling; disruptions; airline; pilot training

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beskow, G. J. (2001). Rescheduling of Airline Pilot Training Activities Following Disruptions. (Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/33629

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beskow, Gregory John. “Rescheduling of Airline Pilot Training Activities Following Disruptions.” 2001. Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/33629.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beskow, Gregory John. “Rescheduling of Airline Pilot Training Activities Following Disruptions.” 2001. Web. 20 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Beskow GJ. Rescheduling of Airline Pilot Training Activities Following Disruptions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2001. [cited 2019 Feb 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/33629.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Beskow GJ. Rescheduling of Airline Pilot Training Activities Following Disruptions. [Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2001. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/33629

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

2. Srivastava, Prateek Raj. A strategic prioritization approach to airline scheduling during disruptions.

Degree: Operations Research and Industrial Engineering, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Air disruption scenarios due to inclement weather or air traffic congestion can result in significant imbalances in the demands and capacities of the affected airports. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) resolves these imbalances by implementing the Ground Delay Programs (GDP). In a GDP, the FAA first assigns new arrival slots to the airlines using the Ration By Schedule (RBS) approach, which is an allocation procedure that assigns slots to incoming flights based on a First-Scheduled, First-Served (FSFS) criterion. The FAA uses these new arrival slots to determine the expected delays and accommodates them as ground delays at departure airports. The notion of FSFS that forms the basis of RBS, is considered to be an industry standard of fairness. One of the major shortcomings of the RBS approach is that it does not distinguish flights based on factors like aircraft size, number of passengers, future aircraft schedules, etc. This results in an inefficient utilization of the airport capacities. To address this concern, Fearing and Kash proposed a two-stage, non-monetary strategic prioritization game in which airlines could participate and bid for priorities at different airports by taking into account their internal costs. This approach has several advantages over different market-based mechanisms like slot auctions, congestion pricing and slot exchanges. In this thesis, therefore, we develop their approach further both mathematically as well as empirically. Specifically, we prove that a pure strategy Nash equilibrium exists in the second stage of the game for the general multiple airlines and multiple airports case. In addition, by imposing the diagonal strict concavity conditions on the airlines' payoffs, we show that this pure strategy Nash equilibrium is unique for the two-airlines case. Our experimental simulations on historical data further show that this approach can achieve significant congestion cost benefits in comparison to the current RBS procedure. Advisors/Committee Members: Dimitrov, Nedialko B. (advisor), Fearing, Douglas (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Airline scheduling; Weather disruptions; Strategic prioritization; Bidding; Auctions; Ground delay program; Ration by schedule

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Srivastava, P. R. (2015). A strategic prioritization approach to airline scheduling during disruptions. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32033

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Srivastava, Prateek Raj. “A strategic prioritization approach to airline scheduling during disruptions.” 2015. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32033.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Srivastava, Prateek Raj. “A strategic prioritization approach to airline scheduling during disruptions.” 2015. Web. 20 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Srivastava PR. A strategic prioritization approach to airline scheduling during disruptions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32033.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Srivastava PR. A strategic prioritization approach to airline scheduling during disruptions. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32033

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Delft University of Technology

3. Vos, H.W.M. Minimising Cost by Dynamic Modelling of Aircraft Recovery in Disrupted Operations:.

Degree: 2015, Delft University of Technology

Subjects/Keywords: Dynamic Modelling; Aircraft Recovery; Airline Recovery; Recovery Operation; Airline Disruptions; Disruption Management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vos, H. W. M. (2015). Minimising Cost by Dynamic Modelling of Aircraft Recovery in Disrupted Operations:. (Masters Thesis). Delft University of Technology. Retrieved from http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:60ad4fc1-73eb-4d7d-b598-771660342449

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vos, H W M. “Minimising Cost by Dynamic Modelling of Aircraft Recovery in Disrupted Operations:.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Delft University of Technology. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:60ad4fc1-73eb-4d7d-b598-771660342449.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vos, H W M. “Minimising Cost by Dynamic Modelling of Aircraft Recovery in Disrupted Operations:.” 2015. Web. 20 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Vos HWM. Minimising Cost by Dynamic Modelling of Aircraft Recovery in Disrupted Operations:. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 20]. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:60ad4fc1-73eb-4d7d-b598-771660342449.

Council of Science Editors:

Vos HWM. Minimising Cost by Dynamic Modelling of Aircraft Recovery in Disrupted Operations:. [Masters Thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2015. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:60ad4fc1-73eb-4d7d-b598-771660342449

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