Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(African statehood). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Pretoria

1. Loubser, Helge-Mari. The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia.

Degree: Political Sciences, 2013, University of Pretoria

State failure impacts international relations through the spill-over effects it has beyond the failed state. The international response to state failure: The case of Somalia attempts to answer the research question "Is the international response to the failed Somalia more concerned with security (i.e. the fight against terrorism and piracy) than with nation building/democratization or humanitarian aid (refugees, poverty)? This question is answered through descriptive-analytical research approach using the Neo-Realist theory within a globalised world. Concepts of legitimacy, authority and sovereignty in relation to the international response are explored where response takes the form of Intervention and humanitarian intervention that could be informed by the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) or go as far as nation building. Various annually published indices that examine and rank failed states are analysed which collectively and independently indicate that Somalia has been the number one failed state since 2008. Historically, the international response to Somalia prior to state collapse in 1991 forms the foundation to the response as well as accounting for the importance of complex internal clan politics. The background to how the international response has been, plays a key role in understanding where the international response‘s motives are positioned on scale of humanitarian versus security motives for intervention. The regional dynamics are explained through the Regional Security Complex (RSC). The security power political motives are seen through Anti-terror motives in a post 9/11 world and the various international responses to the different forms of attempts of interim governments and their opposition movements. Most notably, Al Shabaab, who formally merged with Al Qaeda in 2012, has been a focus point for the international response. The African Union (AU) mission in Somalia AMISOM is analysed from its humble beginnings to a force to be reckoned with. Due to the failure in Somalia for over 20 years, 14 per cent of its population form part of the influential Diaspora group. State building has emerged as one of the major international responses to state failure with the motive of avoiding nationwide humanitarian crisis. Yet the inaction of the past decade has lead to large spread famine in 2011. The security motive of regional and international players has overshadowed a pure humanitarian response in the past but the immensity of the crisis in 2011 has lead to a global humanitarian response. A new window of opportunity has presented itself with the appointment of the new president of the National Constituent Assembly (NCA) in September 2012. The international response to state failure has placed security first and has acted accordingly to limit the international economic and security effects of piracy, terrorism and refugee flows. Nation building has come second although, there have been attempts at achieving a uniform response to the failure in Somalia, neo realist real politik reigns. The ideal of a golden mean,… Advisors/Committee Members: Prof H Solomon (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Piracy; African statehood; Al shabaab; Amisom; Responsibility to protect (r2p); State failure; Somalia; UCTD

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Loubser, H. (2013). The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia. (Masters Thesis). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loubser, Helge-Mari. “The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Pretoria. Accessed July 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loubser, Helge-Mari. “The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia.” 2013. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Loubser H. The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25637.

Council of Science Editors:

Loubser H. The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia. [Masters Thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25637


University of Pretoria

2. Loubser, Helge-Mari. The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia .

Degree: 2013, University of Pretoria

State failure impacts international relations through the spill-over effects it has beyond the failed state. The international response to state failure: The case of Somalia attempts to answer the research question "Is the international response to the failed Somalia more concerned with security (i.e. the fight against terrorism and piracy) than with nation building/democratization or humanitarian aid (refugees, poverty)? This question is answered through descriptive-analytical research approach using the Neo-Realist theory within a globalised world. Concepts of legitimacy, authority and sovereignty in relation to the international response are explored where response takes the form of Intervention and humanitarian intervention that could be informed by the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) or go as far as nation building. Various annually published indices that examine and rank failed states are analysed which collectively and independently indicate that Somalia has been the number one failed state since 2008. Historically, the international response to Somalia prior to state collapse in 1991 forms the foundation to the response as well as accounting for the importance of complex internal clan politics. The background to how the international response has been, plays a key role in understanding where the international response‘s motives are positioned on scale of humanitarian versus security motives for intervention. The regional dynamics are explained through the Regional Security Complex (RSC). The security power political motives are seen through Anti-terror motives in a post 9/11 world and the various international responses to the different forms of attempts of interim governments and their opposition movements. Most notably, Al Shabaab, who formally merged with Al Qaeda in 2012, has been a focus point for the international response. The African Union (AU) mission in Somalia AMISOM is analysed from its humble beginnings to a force to be reckoned with. Due to the failure in Somalia for over 20 years, 14 per cent of its population form part of the influential Diaspora group. State building has emerged as one of the major international responses to state failure with the motive of avoiding nationwide humanitarian crisis. Yet the inaction of the past decade has lead to large spread famine in 2011. The security motive of regional and international players has overshadowed a pure humanitarian response in the past but the immensity of the crisis in 2011 has lead to a global humanitarian response. A new window of opportunity has presented itself with the appointment of the new president of the National Constituent Assembly (NCA) in September 2012. The international response to state failure has placed security first and has acted accordingly to limit the international economic and security effects of piracy, terrorism and refugee flows. Nation building has come second although, there have been attempts at achieving a uniform response to the failure in Somalia, neo realist real politik reigns. The ideal of a golden mean,… Advisors/Committee Members: Prof H Solomon (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Piracy; African statehood; Al shabaab; Amisom; Responsibility to protect (r2p); State failure; Somalia; UCTD

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Loubser, H. (2013). The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia . (Masters Thesis). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06182013-134800/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loubser, Helge-Mari. “The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia .” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Pretoria. Accessed July 19, 2019. http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06182013-134800/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loubser, Helge-Mari. “The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia .” 2013. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Loubser H. The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06182013-134800/.

Council of Science Editors:

Loubser H. The international response to state failure : the case of Somalia . [Masters Thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2013. Available from: http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06182013-134800/


University of Toronto

3. Sium, Aman. Revisinting the "Black Man's Burden": Eritrea and the Curse of the Nation-state.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

This thesis argues that the state apparatus has failed to provide Africans with a culturally compatible form of governance. The state is a product of colonial origin, and thus, has failed to resonate with Indigenous African spirituality, moral consciousness or political tradition. By grounding my argument in the Eritrean context, I make the case that the Eritrean state – not unlike other African states – is failing in three fundamental ways. First, it is oppressive towards Indigenous institutions of governance, particularly the village baito practiced in the rural highlands of Eritrea. Second, the state promotes a national identity that has been arbitrarily formed and colonially imposed in place of Indigenous ones, such as those formed around regional or linguistic groupings. Lastly, because the Eritrean state is a rather new phenomenon that suffers from a crisis of legitimacy, it inevitably falls back on processes of violence, coercion and control to assert its authority.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Wane, Njoki, Sociology and Equity Studies in Education.

Subjects/Keywords: Eritrea; nationalism; statehood; indigenous knowledges; anticolonial thought; Tigrinya; African identity; government; state violence; decolonization

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sium, A. (2010). Revisinting the "Black Man's Burden": Eritrea and the Curse of the Nation-state. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25675

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sium, Aman. “Revisinting the "Black Man's Burden": Eritrea and the Curse of the Nation-state.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed July 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25675.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sium, Aman. “Revisinting the "Black Man's Burden": Eritrea and the Curse of the Nation-state.” 2010. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Sium A. Revisinting the "Black Man's Burden": Eritrea and the Curse of the Nation-state. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25675.

Council of Science Editors:

Sium A. Revisinting the "Black Man's Burden": Eritrea and the Curse of the Nation-state. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/25675

.