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You searched for subject:(Adhesion mechanisms). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Zell, Traci. Two mechanisms of beta1 integrin regulation in human leukocytes.

Degree: PhD, Molecular biology, 1997, University of Michigan

Cell adhesion plays a fundamental role in controlling normal cellular behavior. Integrins are a large family of adhesion molecules that play an important role in mediating lymphocyte interactions with other cells and with components of the extracellular matrix. The distinct array of integrins expressed on the surface of a cell at any given time dictate the spectrum of ECM and cell surface ligands with which the cell can interact. Changes in integrin expression can dramatically affect lymphocyte recirculation and activation. Unlike most cell types in the body that continuously stay in a distinct anatomical location, cells of the immune system require the ability to alternate between adhesive and nonadhesive states in order to function properly. Normal lymphocyte recirculation requires that cells be in a relatively nonadherent state so that rapid movement throughout the vascular and lymphatic systems is not impeded. Movement of cells into peripheral lymphoid organs and other tissues, where antigen recognition occurs, involves a multi-step adhesion process that allows circulating cells to slow down and extravasate through the vascular endothelium. This thesis addresses two important mechanisms that influence lymphocyte adhesion: (1) regulation of cell surface β1 integrin expression and (2) activation-dependent regulation of β1 integrin function. Results using normal Jurkat T cells and α4-deficient Jurkat cells have suggested potential mechanisms that might be used by lymphocytes to regulate cell surface expression of β1 integrins. These studies indicate that expression of individual α subunits may be regulated differently in lymphocytes. Our results suggest a role for both post-transcriptional and post-translation control of α2 subunit protein expression and a role for post-transcriptional regulation of the α5 subunit. In addition, re-expression experiments suggest that the presence of α4 protein may influence cell surface expression of other a subunits. Studies with HL60 transfectants expressing CD2/28 chimeric receptors have implicated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K) as playing an important role in the ability of CD28 to regulate integrin-mediated adhesion. However, substitution of the CD28 SH2-binding motif YMNM with the YVKM motif from CTLA-4 indicated that recruitment and activation of PI 3-K is not a sufficient signal to upregulate β1 integrin-mediated adhesion since this receptor could still mediate PI 3-K activation but not integrin upregulation. Advisors/Committee Members: Shimizu, Yoji (advisor), Koomey, J. Michael (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Adhesion; Beta1; Human; Integrin; Leukocytes; Mechanisms; Pi 3-k; Regulation; Two

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APA (6th Edition):

Zell, T. (1997). Two mechanisms of beta1 integrin regulation in human leukocytes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130404

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zell, Traci. “Two mechanisms of beta1 integrin regulation in human leukocytes.” 1997. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130404.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zell, Traci. “Two mechanisms of beta1 integrin regulation in human leukocytes.” 1997. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Zell T. Two mechanisms of beta1 integrin regulation in human leukocytes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1997. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130404.

Council of Science Editors:

Zell T. Two mechanisms of beta1 integrin regulation in human leukocytes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1997. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130404

2. Sawalha, Mohammed Sa. Development of adhesive test for hot-poured crack sealants.

Degree: MS, Civil Engineering, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Sealants may be defined as the flexible materials used in cracks and/or joints preventing moisture infiltration into the pavements. These materials should acquire certain adhesive and cohesive properties to remain intact in the cracks and/or joints. Hot-poured applied crack sealants are one of the most common preventive techniques in North America that extend pavement life. However, most of these applied sealants fail due to their poor adhesion to crack walls. Various tests are currently used to measure the sealants’ adhesive properties. Most of these tests apply a mechanical load (tensile, shear, bending, torsion, and peeling) or study the chemistry at the interfaces, especially the molecular and interatomic forces generated at the interfaces. These tests, however, either lack a real correlation with field performance or have not yet been validated. This study introduces the development of a procedure for an adhesive prediction test, tensile adhesive method (TAM). It also evaluates the feasibility of two other tests: the single end notch interface (SENI) test and sessile drop method (SDM). TAM test, which is a modified version of the current crack sealant adhesion tester (CSAT) test, shows consistent results among specimens and users. In addition, it was successful in capturing the effect of temperature changes and aging effects. It is concluded that good adhesive properties of hot-poured crack sealant are required for desired field performance, which can be predicted from lab-aged specimen test results. However, other factors affecting sealant performance should be considered, including sealant installation, stiffness, and other preventive maintenance applied to the pavement. Advisors/Committee Members: Al-Qadi, Imad (advisor), Ozer, Hasan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Adhesion; Tensile adhesive method (TAM); Adhesive Tests; Temperature Effect on Adhesion; Aging Effect on Adhesion; Adhesive Mechanisms

…crystal polymer and silicone adhesives. 7 A summary the different mechanisms of adhesion are… …poured crack sealants, including one on adhesion: A crack sealant adhesion test (CSAT)… …x29;. (a) Adhesion Loss (d) Overband Wear (b) Cohesion Loss… …poured crack sealants have limited service lives due to premature failure, of which adhesion… …lack of sealant adhesion characterization, the objective of this study is to develop a… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sawalha, M. S. (2016). Development of adhesive test for hot-poured crack sealants. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90692

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sawalha, Mohammed Sa. “Development of adhesive test for hot-poured crack sealants.” 2016. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90692.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sawalha, Mohammed Sa. “Development of adhesive test for hot-poured crack sealants.” 2016. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sawalha MS. Development of adhesive test for hot-poured crack sealants. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90692.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sawalha MS. Development of adhesive test for hot-poured crack sealants. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90692

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Lin, Yu-Hung. Probing cellular mechano-sensitivity using biomembrane-mimicking cell substrates of adjustable stiffness.

Degree: 2015, IUPUI

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

It is increasingly recognized that mechanical properties of substrates play a pivotal role in the regulation of cellular fate and function. However, the underlying mechanisms of cellular mechanosensing still remain a topic of open debate. Traditionally, advancements in this field have been made using polymeric substrates of adjustable stiffness with immobilized linkers. While such substrates are well suited to examine cell adhesion and migration in an extracellular matrix environment, they are limited in their ability to replicate the rich dynamics found at cell-cell interfaces. To address this challenge, we recently introduced a linker-functionalized polymer-tethered multi-bilayer stack, in which substrate stiffness can be altered by the degree of bilayer stacking, thus allowing the analysis of cellular mechanosensitivity. Here, we apply this novel biomembrane-mimicking cell substrate design to explore the mechanosensitivity of C2C12 myoblasts in the presence of cell-cell-mimicking N-cadherin linkers. Experiments are presented, which demonstrate a relationship between the degree of bilayer stacking and mechanoresponse of plated cells, such as morphology, cytoskeletal organization, cellular traction forces, and migration speed. Furthermore, we illustrate the dynamic assembly of bilayer-bound N-cadherin linkers underneath cellular adherens junctions. In addition, properties of individual and clustered N-cadherins are examined in the polymer-tethered bilayer system in the absence of plated cells. Alternatively, substrate stiffness can be adjusted by the concentration of lipopolymers in a single polymer-tethered lipid bilayer. On the basis of this alternative cell substrate concept, we also discuss recent results on a linker-functionalized single polymer-tethered bilayer substrate with a lateral gradient in lipopolymer concentration (substrate viscoelasticity). Specifically, we show that the lipopolymer gradient has a notable impact on spreading, cytoskeletal organization, and motility of 3T3 fibroblasts. Two cases are discussed: 1. polymer-tethered bilayers with a sharp boundary between low and high lipopolymer concentration regions and 2. polymer-tethered bilayers with a gradual gradient in lipopolymer concentration.

Advisors/Committee Members: Naumann, Christoph A., Das, Chittaranjan, Thompson, David, Long, Eric C..

Subjects/Keywords: Artificial Substrate; Cadherin; Polymer-tethered Bilayer; Biomembrane-mimicking; Lipid Bilayer; Cadherins  – Research; Cell junctions  – Research; Polymers  – Surfaces; Bilayer lipid membranes  – Research; Cell adhesion  – Research  – Analysis; Biological interfaces  – Research  – Analysis; Cellular control mechanisms  – Research; Cells  – Mechanical properties  – Research; Polymers  – Rheology; Artificial cells  – Research

…hydroxysuccinimide. EPI Epifluorescence. FA Focal adhesion. FAK Focal adhesion kinase. FBS Fetal… …function. However, the underlying mechanisms of cellular mechanosensing still remain a topic of… …to examine cell adhesion and migration in an extracellular matrix environment, they are… …physiology of cells and tissue focused on molecular structure and biochemical signaling mechanisms… …between cell forces related from cytoskeleton, such as F-actin, to focal adhesion structure can… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lin, Y. (2015). Probing cellular mechano-sensitivity using biomembrane-mimicking cell substrates of adjustable stiffness. (Thesis). IUPUI. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1805/9965

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lin, Yu-Hung. “Probing cellular mechano-sensitivity using biomembrane-mimicking cell substrates of adjustable stiffness.” 2015. Thesis, IUPUI. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1805/9965.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lin, Yu-Hung. “Probing cellular mechano-sensitivity using biomembrane-mimicking cell substrates of adjustable stiffness.” 2015. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lin Y. Probing cellular mechano-sensitivity using biomembrane-mimicking cell substrates of adjustable stiffness. [Internet] [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/9965.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lin Y. Probing cellular mechano-sensitivity using biomembrane-mimicking cell substrates of adjustable stiffness. [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/9965

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.