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You searched for subject:(Adaptive stiffening). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Minnesota

1. Matus, Daniel Alexander. Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, University of Minnesota

University of Minnesota M.S. thesis. June 2010. Major: Mechanical Engineering. Advisor: Barney E. Klamecki, PhD. 1 computer file (PDF); vii, 88 pages, appendices A-D. Ill. (some col.)

Minimizing the strain energy in an oring seal has been identified as a mode of improving its useful lifetime. The intent of this research was to manipulate the strain energy content in oring seals by varying material properties and material behavior over the crosssection of the oring. Oring designs were developed that contained regions of modified material properties referred to as insets. These oring designs incorporating insets were evaluated numerically to determine the effects that the inset’s stiffness, size, and placement, had on the strain energy content and maximum sealing pressure of the oring design. Achievements included the development of oring designs that demonstrated lower strain energy content than a baseline design made of a single homogeneous material. Experimental orings were created using commercially available materials. Compression set and compression stress relaxation experiments were conducted. Performance of new oring designs including insets made of a softer material than the main oring was compared to baseline single material orings. Improved sealing performance was demonstrated by a decreased rate of sealing force decay over time, and by decreased compression set, for the new oring designs proposed.

Advisors/Committee Members: Barney E. Klamecki, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: Strain energy; O-ring; O-Ring design.; Adaptive-stiffening; Mechanical Engineering.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matus, D. A. (2010). Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/93255

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matus, Daniel Alexander. “Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/93255.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matus, Daniel Alexander. “Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy.” 2010. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Matus DA. Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/93255.

Council of Science Editors:

Matus DA. Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/93255


University of Minnesota

2. Matus, Daniel Alexander. Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, University of Minnesota

Minimizing the strain energy in an oring seal has been identified as a mode of improving its useful lifetime. The intent of this research was to manipulate the strain energy content in oring seals by varying material properties and material behavior over the crosssection of the oring. Oring designs were developed that contained regions of modified material properties referred to as insets. These oring designs incorporating insets were evaluated numerically to determine the effects that the inset’s stiffness, size, and placement, had on the strain energy content and maximum sealing pressure of the oring design. Achievements included the development of oring designs that demonstrated lower strain energy content than a baseline design made of a single homogeneous material. Experimental orings were created using commercially available materials. Compression set and compression stress relaxation experiments were conducted. Performance of new oring designs including insets made of a softer material than the main oring was compared to baseline single material orings. Improved sealing performance was demonstrated by a decreased rate of sealing force decay over time, and by decreased compression set, for the new oring designs proposed.

Subjects/Keywords: Strain energy; O-ring; O-Ring design.; Adaptive-stiffening; Mechanical Engineering.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matus, D. A. (2010). Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/93255

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matus, Daniel Alexander. “Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/93255.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matus, Daniel Alexander. “Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy.” 2010. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Matus DA. Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/93255.

Council of Science Editors:

Matus DA. Improved seal design based on minimizing strain energy. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/93255


Rice University

3. Chipara, Alin Cristian. Interface-Engineered Solid-Liquid Polymer Systems.

Degree: PhD, Engineering, 2017, Rice University

This thesis explores the optimization and design of novel materials by engineering interfaces to impart novel mechanisms to polymer composites and multi-phase materials. By taking advantage of chemical and mechanical interactions it is possible to create materials with novel properties and unique mechanisms such as self-stiffening, self-healing, and adhesion. These properties arise due to large electronegativity differences which are repeated throughout the polymer chains which in turn give rise to strong macroscopic effects. The addition of a dynamic interface, an interface which can move and adapt under varying stress conditions, further enhances the unique properties of these materials. The composites discussed in this thesis were synthesized using a variety of techniques including thermal sonication/chemical synthesis, and mechanical synthesis. These novel composites were characterized using a myriad of techniques such as dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray computerized tomography (CT), in-situ scanning electron microscopy-based (SEM) mechanical testing, tensile testing (ADMET frame), SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), contact angle (CA), optical microscopy, and qualitative testing. Advisors/Committee Members: Ajayan, Pulickel M. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Polymers; mechanical; thermal; blends; pvdf; pdms; ptfe; adhesive; self-stiffening; adaptive

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chipara, A. C. (2017). Interface-Engineered Solid-Liquid Polymer Systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96066

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chipara, Alin Cristian. “Interface-Engineered Solid-Liquid Polymer Systems.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96066.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chipara, Alin Cristian. “Interface-Engineered Solid-Liquid Polymer Systems.” 2017. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Chipara AC. Interface-Engineered Solid-Liquid Polymer Systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96066.

Council of Science Editors:

Chipara AC. Interface-Engineered Solid-Liquid Polymer Systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/96066

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