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You searched for subject:(Aboriginal land values). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of British Columbia

1. Bateson, Kyle Edward. Contemporary and traditional values of a landless Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario .

Degree: 2009, University of British Columbia

It is a commonly held notion among many Aboriginal people that one’s worldview, knowledge, values and identity are shaped through the connection one has with the physical and spiritual components of their traditional territory; the land and waters, the beings which occupy these places and one’s ancestors. For the members of Missanabie Cree First Nation, the connection with their traditional territory was disrupted as a result of the failure of the Crown to set aside land in the treaty process in the early 20th Century. Through a review of literature on the Cree of Northern Ontario and Quebec, this thesis answers questions raised by the community concerning their ancestors’ traditional resource management methods, and the kinship roles associated with these methods. Q-method is used to determine the current day values the members hold regarding the land and waters in and around Missanabie. Knowledge of these values, where members agree and disagree, can assist leadership in making decisions about how to proceed in the reestablishment of a viable Aboriginal community within the traditional territory. From the Q-method, three factors which represent the members values emerged; Cultural and Spiritual Values, Economic and Conservation Values, and Community Infrastructure Values. The factors demonstrate that the First Nation holds a mix of traditional and contemporary values with differences appearing in how each factor describes members’ connection to the land and the desires of what members want the land to provide. To move forward in their journey toward reestablishment on their traditional lands, compromises and accommodations within the community need to be reached, and can best be achieved through comprehensive land management planning.

Subjects/Keywords: Aboriginal land values

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bateson, K. E. (2009). Contemporary and traditional values of a landless Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario . (Thesis). University of British Columbia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2429/4612

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bateson, Kyle Edward. “Contemporary and traditional values of a landless Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario .” 2009. Thesis, University of British Columbia. Accessed May 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2429/4612.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bateson, Kyle Edward. “Contemporary and traditional values of a landless Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario .” 2009. Web. 25 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Bateson KE. Contemporary and traditional values of a landless Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of British Columbia; 2009. [cited 2019 May 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/4612.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bateson KE. Contemporary and traditional values of a landless Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario . [Thesis]. University of British Columbia; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/4612

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Ottawa

2. Chabot, Cecil. Cannibal Wihtiko: Finding Native-Newcomer Common Ground .

Degree: 2016, University of Ottawa

Two prominent historians, David Cannadine and Brad Gregory, have recently contended that history is distorted by overemphasis on human difference and division across time and space. This problem has been acute in studies of Native-Newcomer relations, where exaggeration of Native pre-contact stability and post-contact change further emphasized Native-Newcomer difference. Although questioned in economic, social and political spheres, emphasis on cultural difference persists. To investigate the problem, this study examined the Algonquian wihtiko (windigo), an apparent exemplar of Native-Newcomer difference and division. With a focus on the James Bay Cree, this study first probed the wihtiko phenomenon’s Native origins and meanings. It then examined post-1635 Newcomer encounters with this phenomenon: from the bush to public opinion and law, especially between 1815 and 1914, and in post-1820 academia. Diverse archives, ethnographies, oral traditions, and academic texts were consulted. The cannibal wihtiko evolved from Algonquian attempts to understand and control rare but extreme mental and moral failures in famine contexts. It attained mythical proportions, but fears of wihtiko possession, transformation and violence remained real enough to provoke pre-emptive killings even of family members. Wihtiko beliefs also influenced Algonquian manifestations and interpretations of generic mental and moral failures. Consciously or not, others used it to scapegoat, manipulate, or kill. Newcomers threatened by moral and mental failures attributed to the wihtiko often took Algonquian beliefs and practices seriously, even espousing them. Yet Algonquian wihtiko behaviours, beliefs and practices sometimes presented Newcomers with another layer of questions about mental and moral incompetence. Collisions arose when they discounted, misconstrued or asserted control over Algonquian beliefs and practices. For post-colonial critics, this has raised a third layer of questions about intellectual and moral incompetence. Yet some critics have also misconstrued earlier attempts to understand and control the wihtiko, or attributed an apparent lack of scholarly consensus to Western cultural incompetence or inability to grasp the wihtiko. In contrast, this study of wihtiko phenomena reveals deeper commonalities and continuities. They are obscured by the complex evolution of Natives’ and Newcomers’ struggles to understand and control the wihtiko. Yet hidden in these very struggles and the wihtiko itself is a persistent shared conviction that reducing others to objects of power signals mental and moral failure. The wihtiko reveals cultural differences, changes and divisions, but exemplifies more fundamental commonalities and continuities.

Subjects/Keywords: Windigo; wihtiko; wendigo; cannibal; Native-Newcomer; Aboriginal; Indigenous; intercutural; culture; cross-cultural; James Bay Cree; Mushkego; Indigenous law; court; anthropology; trans-cultural psychiatry; madness; monstrous; insanity; monster; problem of evil; power-knowledge; Foucault; religion; spiritual; Christian mission; inter-religious; common ground; fur trade; Rupert's Land; Hudson's Bay Company; Colonialism; imperialism; British North America; postcolonial; postmodern; penal law; insanity defence; values; ideals

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chabot, C. (2016). Cannibal Wihtiko: Finding Native-Newcomer Common Ground . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chabot, Cecil. “Cannibal Wihtiko: Finding Native-Newcomer Common Ground .” 2016. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed May 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chabot, Cecil. “Cannibal Wihtiko: Finding Native-Newcomer Common Ground .” 2016. Web. 25 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Chabot C. Cannibal Wihtiko: Finding Native-Newcomer Common Ground . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2016. [cited 2019 May 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chabot C. Cannibal Wihtiko: Finding Native-Newcomer Common Ground . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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