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You searched for subject:(Aboriginal Health Workers). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Kirkham, Renae. Obligation and compromise: Aboriginal maternal infant care workers successes, challenges and partnerships.

Degree: 2015, University of Adelaide

Marked inequalities in maternal and child health exist between Australia’s Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations. Improving the care of Aboriginal women before and during pregnancy has been identified as a key strategy to closing the gap in health outcomes. In 2004 a new birthing model of care was introduced into Port Augusta and Whyalla with the implementation of the Anangu Bibi Regional Family Birthing Program and the Aboriginal Regional Family Birthing Program. The model includes Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care (AMIC) workers, a specialised role unique to South Australia, working in partnership with midwives and other care providers to deliver antenatal and postnatal care. This project broadly aims to increase understanding of the role of the AMIC worker and explore the ways in which they manage the interface between the biomedical model of maternity care and Aboriginal knowledge and beliefs about reproductive health. This study was preceded by consultations with Aboriginal community leaders in Port Augusta and Whyalla, the State-wide Steering Committee overseeing the programs, Pika Wiya Health Service and the Port Augusta Regional Hospital. The data that informs the research include narratives from semi-structured interviews that were undertaken with six AMIC workers, six program midwives, five ward midwives, two medical practitioners and eleven clients. Analyses were undertaken to identify the major factors influencing the role and wellbeing of AMIC workers and the program environment. Analyses revealed a number of key influences on the ways AMIC workers negotiate the space in which they work. These included the strength of their relationships with colleagues and clients, their ability to advocate for both parties, and their level of confidence and self-worth arising from the value they place on clinical and cultural knowledge. AMIC workers continue to be challenged by the recognised differences between Aboriginal and Western cultures in relation to views about health, and this is often compounded by the intensive medicalisation of pregnancy and birthing. Furthermore, the traditional Westernised work ethic in place in a highly medicalised health system creates expectations about the ‘ideal worker’, which are outdated and inappropriate to AMIC workers, who often have many cultural and family obligations. These expectations, along with other systemic factors (e.g. inflexible visitation times, experiences of institutionalised racism) and aspects of AMIC worker’s private lives (e.g. extent of caring responsibilities) contribute to experiences of emotional labour and burnout. However, a strong AMIC-midwife partnership may act as a buffer to the challenges associated with the AMIC role, as it provides opportunities for two-way learning and promotes respect for individuals that may have different worldviews. This study has identified a number of complexities facing AMIC workers that are often invisible to the systems and institutions they are working in. Strategies that support the development of positive… Advisors/Committee Members: Moore, Vivienne Marie (advisor), Rumbold, Alice Rosemary (advisor), Hoon, Elizabeth (advisor), School of Public Health (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care Workers; Aboriginal health; maternity care; nursing; midwifery; Aboriginal Health Workers; partnership

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kirkham, R. (2015). Obligation and compromise: Aboriginal maternal infant care workers successes, challenges and partnerships. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95307

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kirkham, Renae. “Obligation and compromise: Aboriginal maternal infant care workers successes, challenges and partnerships.” 2015. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95307.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kirkham, Renae. “Obligation and compromise: Aboriginal maternal infant care workers successes, challenges and partnerships.” 2015. Web. 06 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Kirkham R. Obligation and compromise: Aboriginal maternal infant care workers successes, challenges and partnerships. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2015. [cited 2020 Apr 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95307.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kirkham R. Obligation and compromise: Aboriginal maternal infant care workers successes, challenges and partnerships. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95307

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Western Australia

2. Owen, Julie. Development of a culturally sensitive program delivering cardiovascular health education to indigenous Australians, in South-West towns of Western Australia with lay educators as community role models.

Degree: PhD, 2006, University of Western Australia

[Truncated abstract] Indigenous Australians suffer cardiovascular disease (CVD) at a rate six times greater than the general population in Australia and while the incidence of CVD has been reduced dramatically amongst the majority of non-indigenous Australians and amongst Indigenous populations in other countries in the last 30 years, there has been little change in the figures for Aboriginal Australians, showing that heart health campaigns have little impact, for this group of people. Aims : The principal aims of this study were firstly, to determine and record the barriers to the development and delivery of CVD prevention programs amongst Indigenous Australians and secondly, to develop an alternative, effective and culturally sensitive method of delivering heart health messages. Methods and results : The study was qualitative research undertaken in three South-West towns of Western Australia where the incidence of CVD was high amongst the Aboriginal community members. The use of semi-formal interviews, informal individual consultation, observation, and focus groups were methods implemented to obtain information. The first phase of the research was to identify the barriers which affected the Aboriginal Health Workers’ ability to deliver specialist educational programs. Questionnaires and interviews with the Aboriginal Health Workers and other health professionals in the towns, and community focus groups were undertaken in this phase of the study. The second phase of the research was aimed at developing an alternative strategy for delivering heart health messages. The focus changed to adopt more traditional ways of passing on information in Indigenous communities. The idea of small gatherings of friends or family with a trusted community member presenting the health message was developed. The third phase of the research was to implement this new approach. Lay educators who had been identified within focus groups and by Aboriginal Health Workers were trained in each of the towns and a protocol involving discussions of health issues, viewing a video on CVD, produced by the National Heart Foundation, sharing in a ‘heart healthy’ lunch and partaking in a ‘heart health’ knowledge game which was developed specifically for the gatherings. Several of these gatherings were held in each of the towns and they became known as ‘HeartAware parties’.

[Truncated abstract] Indigenous Australians suffer cardiovascular disease (CVD) at a rate six times greater than the general population in Australia and while the incidence of CVD has been reduced dramatically amongst the majority of non-indigenous Australians and amongst Indigenous populations in other countries in the last 30 years, there has been little change in the figures for Aboriginal Australians, showing that heart health campaigns have little impact, for this group of people. Aims : The principal aims of this study were firstly, to determine and record the barriers to the development and delivery of CVD prevention programs…

Subjects/Keywords: Cardiovascular system; Aboriginal Australians; Community health aides; Health education; Aboriginal health workers; Health promotion; Lay educators; Cardiovascular disease

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Owen, J. (2006). Development of a culturally sensitive program delivering cardiovascular health education to indigenous Australians, in South-West towns of Western Australia with lay educators as community role models. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Western Australia. Retrieved from http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7069&local_base=GEN01-INS01

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Owen, Julie. “Development of a culturally sensitive program delivering cardiovascular health education to indigenous Australians, in South-West towns of Western Australia with lay educators as community role models.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Western Australia. Accessed April 06, 2020. http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7069&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Owen, Julie. “Development of a culturally sensitive program delivering cardiovascular health education to indigenous Australians, in South-West towns of Western Australia with lay educators as community role models.” 2006. Web. 06 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Owen J. Development of a culturally sensitive program delivering cardiovascular health education to indigenous Australians, in South-West towns of Western Australia with lay educators as community role models. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Western Australia; 2006. [cited 2020 Apr 06]. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7069&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

Council of Science Editors:

Owen J. Development of a culturally sensitive program delivering cardiovascular health education to indigenous Australians, in South-West towns of Western Australia with lay educators as community role models. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Western Australia; 2006. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7069&local_base=GEN01-INS01

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