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You searched for subject:(AMBUR). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Ashby, Heather Louise. A spatial model ranking the potential for mitigation sites based on ecosystem functions.

Degree: 2014, University of Georgia

Wetland mitigation can be accomplished through the enhancement, protection, creation or restoration of wetlands. In coastal regions, mitigated sites are at risk of being lost or degraded due to the land use changes that occur in reponse to sea-level rise, loss of shoreline stability, and human alterations. To improve the success of mitigated coastal wetlands, it is imperative that the future risks to these sites be known. To accomplish this, a future land use map is created for the year 2030 for coastal Georgia which is used in a risk assessment to identify 1) the wetlands that are most at risk of being lost or degraded in the year 2030, 2) where sites with the greatest potential for benefiting wetland functions occur in the landscape for the years 2008 and 2030, and 3) where the potential will increase the most during this time frame.

Subjects/Keywords: Wetlands; Wetland Mitigation; Coastal Wetlands; GIS; Spatial Analysis Modeling; SLAMM; SLEUTH; AMBUR; Future Land Use; Marshes; Sea Level Rise; Shoreline Stability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ashby, H. L. (2014). A spatial model ranking the potential for mitigation sites based on ecosystem functions. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/27377

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ashby, Heather Louise. “A spatial model ranking the potential for mitigation sites based on ecosystem functions.” 2014. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/27377.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ashby, Heather Louise. “A spatial model ranking the potential for mitigation sites based on ecosystem functions.” 2014. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ashby HL. A spatial model ranking the potential for mitigation sites based on ecosystem functions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/27377.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ashby HL. A spatial model ranking the potential for mitigation sites based on ecosystem functions. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/27377

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia Southern University

2. Wakefield, Katherine R. Assessing Shoreline Change and Vegetation Cover Adjacent to Back-Barrier Shoreline Stabilization Structures in Georgia Estuaries.

Degree: MSin Biology (M.S.), Department of Biology, 2016, Georgia Southern University

Anthropogenic stabilization of erosional shorelines by hard-armoring structures is used for protection of property, especially if buildings, historical monuments, cultural resources, or other infrastructure are present. The post-installation effects of shoreline stabilization structures on adjacent shorelines in the back-barrier marshes of coastal Georgia are a concern, and interest in living shorelines as erosion control devices has increased because of their use of natural materials and vegetation. AMBUR shoreline analysis software was used to calculate pre-and post-installation shoreline change rates of shorelines adjacent to riprap and bulkhead structures. There was no significant difference between the post-installation shoreline change rates of the structures, but individually there is erosion immediately adjacent to four of the structures after installation (the end-around effect). Vegetation percent cover, stem height, and stem densities were measured in addition to shoreline change rates. Analysis of vegetation showed similarities between shorelines adjacent to living shorelines and control sites. There are significant differences in to vegetation cover between riprap structures and the control sites, and these results showed that installation of riprap structures significantly changes the vegetation cover of the adjacent, unprotected shorelines. These results provide novel methodologies and initial data for determining the influence of erosion control structures on back-barrier shorelines. The researcher identified limitations with available data sets and supplied needed results to researchers for future study and to coastal managers for better informed decision making about the effects of shoreline stabilization structures on adjacent shorelines. Advisors/Committee Members: Christine Hladik, Risa Cohen.

Subjects/Keywords: AMBUR; End-Around Effect; Erosion; Shoreline Change Rates; Shoreline Stabilization Structures; Vegetation Cover; Biology; Geomorphology; Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies, Electronic Theses & Dissertations, ETDs, Student Research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wakefield, K. R. (2016). Assessing Shoreline Change and Vegetation Cover Adjacent to Back-Barrier Shoreline Stabilization Structures in Georgia Estuaries. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1508

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wakefield, Katherine R. “Assessing Shoreline Change and Vegetation Cover Adjacent to Back-Barrier Shoreline Stabilization Structures in Georgia Estuaries.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 15, 2021. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1508.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wakefield, Katherine R. “Assessing Shoreline Change and Vegetation Cover Adjacent to Back-Barrier Shoreline Stabilization Structures in Georgia Estuaries.” 2016. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wakefield KR. Assessing Shoreline Change and Vegetation Cover Adjacent to Back-Barrier Shoreline Stabilization Structures in Georgia Estuaries. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1508.

Council of Science Editors:

Wakefield KR. Assessing Shoreline Change and Vegetation Cover Adjacent to Back-Barrier Shoreline Stabilization Structures in Georgia Estuaries. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1508


University of Georgia

3. Jackson, Chester W. Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change.

Degree: 2014, University of Georgia

Deficiencies exist in the study of shoreline dynamics of Georgia’s barrier islands and the processes that influence change. Previously unexamined shoreline localities that were difficult to assess using existing techniques and software programs provide a basis for the development of new tools and methods for analyzing change. AMBUR (Analyzing Moving Boundaries Using R) was developed to analyze shoreline change along barrier islands with complex shapes and highly curved coastlines. Built using the R programming environment, AMBUR provides a suite of functions for quantifying the rate and magnitude of shoreline movement and performs additional statistical, graphical, and geospatial analyses. The reliability of transect-based analyses is improved using new techniques for curved shorelines too problematic for the traditional perpendicular-transect method. Application of AMBUR to Georgia’s barrier islands provides a robust dataset for island-wide shoreline change and assists with classifying the modern behavior of the coast. Historical shorelines from 1855 to 2004 were analyzed and partitioned into oceanfront, backbarrier, and inlet-facing zones. Throughout the 1855 to 2004 era, 41 % of Georgia’s oceanfront shoreline eroded at a mean rate of -1.66 m/yr EPR (± 0.06 m/yr) and the remaining shoreline accreted at 2.25 m/yr EPR (± 0.06 m/yr). The backbarrier eroded along 65 % of the shore at a mean rate of -0.35 m/yr EPR (± 0.07 m/yr) throughout the period. More than half of the islands exhibit a net seaward shift in area and regressive behavior, whereas Wolf and St. Catherines Islands are thinning and shortening and are transgressive, erosional hotspots. Reversals of longshore transport currents, primarily due to inlet dynamics and seasonal shifts in climate regimes, promote periods of accretion and erosion along the northern and southern ends of some islands. Stable, migrating, and ephemeral inlet processes at the local level exert the greatest influence over oceanfront shorelines. Backbarrier shorelines are primarily influenced by tidal creek migration, proximity to inlets and confluences of other streams. Human activities are influencing shoreline erosion and accretion rates through uses of hard/soft stabilization and dredging activities.

Subjects/Keywords: shoreline change; oceanfront; backbarrier; inlet; coastal mapping; Holocene; Pleistocene; AMBUR; transect; baseline; erosion; accretion; t-sheets; aerial photography; endpoint rate; morphodynamics; anthropogenic; hard stabilization; storms; rivers; tidal

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, C. W. (2014). Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Chester W. “Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change.” 2014. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Chester W. “Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change.” 2014. Web. 15 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Jackson CW. Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson CW. Spatio-temporal analysis of barrier island shoreline change. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26360

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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