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You searched for subject:(0740). Showing records 1 – 23 of 23 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Laing, Marie. Conversations with Young Two-Spirit, Trans and Queer Indigenous People About the Term Two-Spirit.

Degree: 2018, University of Toronto

Since the coining of the term in 1990, two-spirit has been used with increasing frequency in reference to Indigenous LGBTQ people; however, there is rarely… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Indigenous; queer; trans; two-spirit; youth; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Laing, M. (2018). Conversations with Young Two-Spirit, Trans and Queer Indigenous People About the Term Two-Spirit. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91455

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Laing, Marie. “Conversations with Young Two-Spirit, Trans and Queer Indigenous People About the Term Two-Spirit.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91455.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Laing, Marie. “Conversations with Young Two-Spirit, Trans and Queer Indigenous People About the Term Two-Spirit.” 2018. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Laing M. Conversations with Young Two-Spirit, Trans and Queer Indigenous People About the Term Two-Spirit. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91455.

Council of Science Editors:

Laing M. Conversations with Young Two-Spirit, Trans and Queer Indigenous People About the Term Two-Spirit. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91455


University of Toronto

2. Wyatt, Kyle Carsten. Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature.

Degree: 2011, University of Toronto

“Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature” recuperates the print culture phenomenon of literary map production, which became popular in North… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Literary Map; Spatial Turn; 0591; 0323; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Wyatt, K. C. (2011). Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/71831

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wyatt, Kyle Carsten. “Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/71831.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wyatt, Kyle Carsten. “Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature.” 2011. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Wyatt KC. Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2011. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/71831.

Council of Science Editors:

Wyatt KC. Cartographers as Critics: Staking Claims in the Mapping of American Literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/71831


University of Toronto

3. Koleszar-Green, Ruth. Understanding your Education: Onkwehonwe and Guests Responsibilities to Peace, Friendship and Mutual Respect.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Toronto

 This thesis explores how Guest participants have engaged with Onkwehonwe (Original People in Mohawk) worldviews as they enrol within post-secondary courses about Onkwehonwe topics, taught… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Guests; Indigenous Education; Indigenous Worldviews; Onkwehonwe; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Koleszar-Green, R. (2016). Understanding your Education: Onkwehonwe and Guests Responsibilities to Peace, Friendship and Mutual Respect. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73051

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koleszar-Green, Ruth. “Understanding your Education: Onkwehonwe and Guests Responsibilities to Peace, Friendship and Mutual Respect.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73051.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koleszar-Green, Ruth. “Understanding your Education: Onkwehonwe and Guests Responsibilities to Peace, Friendship and Mutual Respect.” 2016. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Koleszar-Green R. Understanding your Education: Onkwehonwe and Guests Responsibilities to Peace, Friendship and Mutual Respect. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73051.

Council of Science Editors:

Koleszar-Green R. Understanding your Education: Onkwehonwe and Guests Responsibilities to Peace, Friendship and Mutual Respect. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73051


University of Toronto

4. Maxson, Natalie. Tee Peez, Totem Polz, and the Spectre of Indianness as Other.

Degree: 2012, University of Toronto

The purpose of this thesis is to destabilize notions that representations of ‘Indians’ as they appear in contemporary Switzerland, Germany, and France are benign. Rather,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Race; Indigenous people; Switzerland; self-determination; power; Foucault; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Maxson, N. (2012). Tee Peez, Totem Polz, and the Spectre of Indianness as Other. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32447

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maxson, Natalie. “Tee Peez, Totem Polz, and the Spectre of Indianness as Other.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32447.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maxson, Natalie. “Tee Peez, Totem Polz, and the Spectre of Indianness as Other.” 2012. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Maxson N. Tee Peez, Totem Polz, and the Spectre of Indianness as Other. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32447.

Council of Science Editors:

Maxson N. Tee Peez, Totem Polz, and the Spectre of Indianness as Other. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32447


University of Toronto

5. Doran, John. A Long Way Home: First Nations Adoptions and Repatriations.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Toronto

 This dissertation project explores a phenomenon known as the Sixties Scoop and some of its consequences as told by survivors through their own oral testimony.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Aboriginal; Adoptions; Genocide; Identity; Indigenous; Sixties Scoop; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Doran, J. (2016). A Long Way Home: First Nations Adoptions and Repatriations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82420

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Doran, John. “A Long Way Home: First Nations Adoptions and Repatriations.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82420.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Doran, John. “A Long Way Home: First Nations Adoptions and Repatriations.” 2016. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Doran J. A Long Way Home: First Nations Adoptions and Repatriations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82420.

Council of Science Editors:

Doran J. A Long Way Home: First Nations Adoptions and Repatriations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82420

6. Galgamuwe Arachchige, Pabodha Galgamuwa. Evaluating nutritional and behavioral health and vegetable cultivars as part of a Native American gardening project.

Degree: MS, Department of Horticulture, Forestry, and Recreation Resources, 2013, Kansas State University

 Due to health and nutritional disparities, prevalence of obesity and related diseases among American Indians is found to be higher than the U.S. general population.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Potawatomi; Diet; Tribal; Socioeconomic; Horticulture (0471); Native American Studies (0740); Social Research (0344)

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APA (6th Edition):

Galgamuwe Arachchige, P. G. (2013). Evaluating nutritional and behavioral health and vegetable cultivars as part of a Native American gardening project. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16892

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Galgamuwe Arachchige, Pabodha Galgamuwa. “Evaluating nutritional and behavioral health and vegetable cultivars as part of a Native American gardening project.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16892.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Galgamuwe Arachchige, Pabodha Galgamuwa. “Evaluating nutritional and behavioral health and vegetable cultivars as part of a Native American gardening project.” 2013. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Galgamuwe Arachchige PG. Evaluating nutritional and behavioral health and vegetable cultivars as part of a Native American gardening project. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16892.

Council of Science Editors:

Galgamuwe Arachchige PG. Evaluating nutritional and behavioral health and vegetable cultivars as part of a Native American gardening project. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16892


University of Toronto

7. Bourgeois, Robyn Sanderson. Warrior Women: Indigenous Women's Anti-violence Engagement with the Canadian State.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Toronto

 This study examines indigenous women's involvement in state-sponsored anti-violence responses since the 1980s. It focuses on three fields of political engagement: (1) the Canadian state… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anti-violence resistance; Canada; indigenous women; state sponsored anti-violence responses; violence; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Bourgeois, R. S. (2014). Warrior Women: Indigenous Women's Anti-violence Engagement with the Canadian State. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68238

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bourgeois, Robyn Sanderson. “Warrior Women: Indigenous Women's Anti-violence Engagement with the Canadian State.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68238.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bourgeois, Robyn Sanderson. “Warrior Women: Indigenous Women's Anti-violence Engagement with the Canadian State.” 2014. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Bourgeois RS. Warrior Women: Indigenous Women's Anti-violence Engagement with the Canadian State. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68238.

Council of Science Editors:

Bourgeois RS. Warrior Women: Indigenous Women's Anti-violence Engagement with the Canadian State. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68238


University of Toronto

8. Hill, Daniel Louis. The Reflective Practitioner: On the Margins­ Talking with Métis Educator Dave Skene about his Life's Work.

Degree: 2009, University of Toronto

In this Arts-informed Life History I use dialogue and narrative to illustrate “pedagogy in practice” and illuminate the life’s work of Métis adult educator Dave… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: life history; arts-informed; biography; metis; adult education; dialogue; reflexive inquiry; Aboriginal; native; narrative; 0516; 0326; 0304; 0318; 0401; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Hill, D. L. (2009). The Reflective Practitioner: On the Margins­ Talking with Métis Educator Dave Skene about his Life's Work. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18118

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hill, Daniel Louis. “The Reflective Practitioner: On the Margins­ Talking with Métis Educator Dave Skene about his Life's Work.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18118.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hill, Daniel Louis. “The Reflective Practitioner: On the Margins­ Talking with Métis Educator Dave Skene about his Life's Work.” 2009. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Hill DL. The Reflective Practitioner: On the Margins­ Talking with Métis Educator Dave Skene about his Life's Work. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18118.

Council of Science Editors:

Hill DL. The Reflective Practitioner: On the Margins­ Talking with Métis Educator Dave Skene about his Life's Work. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18118


University of Toronto

9. Knight, Emma Louise. The Kwakwaka’wakw Potlatch Collection and its Many Social Contexts: Constructing a Collection’s Object Biography.

Degree: 2013, University of Toronto

In 1921, the Canadian government confiscated over 400 pieces of Kwakwaka’wakw potlatch regalia and placed it in three large museums. In 1967 the Kwakwaka'wakw initiated… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Object Biography; Museum Collections; Kwakwaka'wakw; First Nations; repatriation; potlatch collection; objecthood; subjecthood; institutional forgetting; cultural centres; 0730; 0740; 0326; 0377

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APA (6th Edition):

Knight, E. L. (2013). The Kwakwaka’wakw Potlatch Collection and its Many Social Contexts: Constructing a Collection’s Object Biography. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/42997

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knight, Emma Louise. “The Kwakwaka’wakw Potlatch Collection and its Many Social Contexts: Constructing a Collection’s Object Biography.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/42997.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knight, Emma Louise. “The Kwakwaka’wakw Potlatch Collection and its Many Social Contexts: Constructing a Collection’s Object Biography.” 2013. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Knight EL. The Kwakwaka’wakw Potlatch Collection and its Many Social Contexts: Constructing a Collection’s Object Biography. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/42997.

Council of Science Editors:

Knight EL. The Kwakwaka’wakw Potlatch Collection and its Many Social Contexts: Constructing a Collection’s Object Biography. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/42997


University of Toronto

10. Cameron, Rose Ella. What are you in the dark? The Transformatiive Powers of Manitouminasuc upon the Identities of Anishinabeg in the Ontario Child Welfare System.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore, describe and examine how the child welfare experience affects the personal and social identities of Anishinabe… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Aboriginal Identity; Child Welfare; Relationships; Social Change; Philosophy; Social Policy; Personal Development; Culture; Feminism; 0452; 0700; 0740; 0451; 0422; 0628; 0453

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APA (6th Edition):

Cameron, R. E. (2010). What are you in the dark? The Transformatiive Powers of Manitouminasuc upon the Identities of Anishinabeg in the Ontario Child Welfare System. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26156

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cameron, Rose Ella. “What are you in the dark? The Transformatiive Powers of Manitouminasuc upon the Identities of Anishinabeg in the Ontario Child Welfare System.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26156.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cameron, Rose Ella. “What are you in the dark? The Transformatiive Powers of Manitouminasuc upon the Identities of Anishinabeg in the Ontario Child Welfare System.” 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Cameron RE. What are you in the dark? The Transformatiive Powers of Manitouminasuc upon the Identities of Anishinabeg in the Ontario Child Welfare System. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26156.

Council of Science Editors:

Cameron RE. What are you in the dark? The Transformatiive Powers of Manitouminasuc upon the Identities of Anishinabeg in the Ontario Child Welfare System. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26156


University of Toronto

11. Cote-Meek, Sheila Louise. Exploring the Impact of Ongoing Colonial Violence on Aboriginal Students in the Postsecondary Classroom.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

Framed within an Anishnaabe method and an anti-colonial discursive framework, this thesis explores how Aboriginal students confront narratives of colonial violence in the postsecondary classroom… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Aboriginal education; Colonial Violence; Aboriginal pedagogy; Indigenous education; Racism and education; Racism and Aboriginal students; 0515; 0516; 0745; 0340; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Cote-Meek, S. L. (2010). Exploring the Impact of Ongoing Colonial Violence on Aboriginal Students in the Postsecondary Classroom. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24729

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cote-Meek, Sheila Louise. “Exploring the Impact of Ongoing Colonial Violence on Aboriginal Students in the Postsecondary Classroom.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24729.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cote-Meek, Sheila Louise. “Exploring the Impact of Ongoing Colonial Violence on Aboriginal Students in the Postsecondary Classroom.” 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Cote-Meek SL. Exploring the Impact of Ongoing Colonial Violence on Aboriginal Students in the Postsecondary Classroom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24729.

Council of Science Editors:

Cote-Meek SL. Exploring the Impact of Ongoing Colonial Violence on Aboriginal Students in the Postsecondary Classroom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24729


University of Toronto

12. Brunette, Candace. Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC).

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

This research examines Native Performance Culture (NPC), a unique practice in Native theatre that returns Aboriginal people to the sources of Aboriginal knowledge, and interrupts… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Indigenous Knowledge; Decolonization; Native theatre; Oral Tradition; Cree; Community Art; James Bay; Monique Mojica; Floyd Favel; Erika Iserhoff; Performance; Ontario; Aboriginal; Indigenous Research; 0740; 0465; 0273

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APA (6th Edition):

Brunette, C. (2010). Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC). (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24224

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brunette, Candace. “Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC).” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24224.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brunette, Candace. “Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC).” 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Brunette C. Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24224.

Council of Science Editors:

Brunette C. Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC). [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24224


University of Toronto

13. Chacaby, Maya. Kipimoojikewin: Articulating Anishinaabe Pedagogy Through Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language) Revitalization.

Degree: 2011, University of Toronto

In Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe language), Kipimoojikewin refers to our inheritance, or the things we carry with us. While Anishinaabemowin, Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) pedagogy and research practices are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anishinaabe pedagogy; Ojibwe language; Ojibwe philosophy; Anishinaabemowin; Aboriginal worldview; Aboriginal education; self-determination; Anishinaabe axiology; Indigenous language revitalization; Aboriginal pedagogy; Aboriginal research; colonization; 0515; 0422; 0998; 0279; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Chacaby, M. (2011). Kipimoojikewin: Articulating Anishinaabe Pedagogy Through Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language) Revitalization. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30080

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chacaby, Maya. “Kipimoojikewin: Articulating Anishinaabe Pedagogy Through Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language) Revitalization.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30080.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chacaby, Maya. “Kipimoojikewin: Articulating Anishinaabe Pedagogy Through Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language) Revitalization.” 2011. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Chacaby M. Kipimoojikewin: Articulating Anishinaabe Pedagogy Through Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language) Revitalization. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2011. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30080.

Council of Science Editors:

Chacaby M. Kipimoojikewin: Articulating Anishinaabe Pedagogy Through Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language) Revitalization. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/30080


University of Toronto

14. Freeman, Victoria Jane. "Toronto Has No History!" Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and Historical Memory in Canada's Largest City.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

The Indigenous past is largely absent from settler representations of the history of the city of Toronto, Canada. Nineteenth and twentieth century historical chroniclers often… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: history; Canada; Toronto; Indigenous; Aboriginal; Native peoples; urban history; colonialism; historical memory; Anishinaabe; Mississaugas; Indigeneity; Haudenosaunee; Credit River; oral history; historical consciousness; 0334; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Freeman, V. J. (2010). "Toronto Has No History!" Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and Historical Memory in Canada's Largest City. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26356

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Freeman, Victoria Jane. “"Toronto Has No History!" Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and Historical Memory in Canada's Largest City.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26356.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Freeman, Victoria Jane. “"Toronto Has No History!" Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and Historical Memory in Canada's Largest City.” 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Freeman VJ. "Toronto Has No History!" Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and Historical Memory in Canada's Largest City. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26356.

Council of Science Editors:

Freeman VJ. "Toronto Has No History!" Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, and Historical Memory in Canada's Largest City. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26356


University of Toronto

15. Dalton, Zoe. As We Move Ahead Together: Foregrounding Reconciliating and Renewed First Nation/ Non-Aboriginal Relations in Environmental Management and Research.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

The research project upon which this dissertation is based focused on enhancing understandings of the nature of current First Nations/non-Aboriginal relations in environmental management. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Indigenous; Species at risk; Indigenous knowledge; First Nations/non-Aboriginal relations; Environmental management; Endangered species; Endangered ecosystems; Community-based research; Decolonization; Reconciliation; Decolonizing research; Traditional ecological knowledge; Southern Ontario; Collaborative research; Aboriginal; First Nation; Colonialism; Species at Risk Act; Governance; Intellectual imperialism; 0740; 0768; 0366

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APA (6th Edition):

Dalton, Z. (2010). As We Move Ahead Together: Foregrounding Reconciliating and Renewed First Nation/ Non-Aboriginal Relations in Environmental Management and Research. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26163

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dalton, Zoe. “As We Move Ahead Together: Foregrounding Reconciliating and Renewed First Nation/ Non-Aboriginal Relations in Environmental Management and Research.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26163.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dalton, Zoe. “As We Move Ahead Together: Foregrounding Reconciliating and Renewed First Nation/ Non-Aboriginal Relations in Environmental Management and Research.” 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Dalton Z. As We Move Ahead Together: Foregrounding Reconciliating and Renewed First Nation/ Non-Aboriginal Relations in Environmental Management and Research. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26163.

Council of Science Editors:

Dalton Z. As We Move Ahead Together: Foregrounding Reconciliating and Renewed First Nation/ Non-Aboriginal Relations in Environmental Management and Research. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26163


University of Toronto

16. Spence, Martha E. Can the Assembly of First Nations Education Action Plan Succeed? Colonialism’s Effect on Traditional Knowledge in Two Communities.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

have altered the context and practices of the First Nations culture and by so doing, compromised their will and capacity to implement traditional education policies,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: First Nations; First Nations Communities; First Nations Schools; First Nations Communitiy Curriculum; Traditional Knowledge; Traditional Knowledge and Colonialism; Colinialism and First Nations; Colonialism and Curriculum in First Nations Schools; 0514; 0515; 0326; 0282; 0534; 0334; 0740; 0700

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APA (6th Edition):

Spence, M. E. (2010). Can the Assembly of First Nations Education Action Plan Succeed? Colonialism’s Effect on Traditional Knowledge in Two Communities. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26384

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spence, Martha E. “Can the Assembly of First Nations Education Action Plan Succeed? Colonialism’s Effect on Traditional Knowledge in Two Communities.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26384.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spence, Martha E. “Can the Assembly of First Nations Education Action Plan Succeed? Colonialism’s Effect on Traditional Knowledge in Two Communities.” 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Spence ME. Can the Assembly of First Nations Education Action Plan Succeed? Colonialism’s Effect on Traditional Knowledge in Two Communities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26384.

Council of Science Editors:

Spence ME. Can the Assembly of First Nations Education Action Plan Succeed? Colonialism’s Effect on Traditional Knowledge in Two Communities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26384

17. Nolan, Raymond Anthony. Clean my land: American Indians, tribal sovereignty, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Degree: PhD, History, 2015, Kansas State University

 This dissertation is a case study of the Isleta Pueblos of central New Mexico, the Quapaw tribe of northeast Oklahoma, and the Osage Nation of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: American Indians; Sovereignty; Environmental Protection Agency; American History (0337); Native American Studies (0740)

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APA (6th Edition):

Nolan, R. A. (2015). Clean my land: American Indians, tribal sovereignty, and the Environmental Protection Agency. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20509

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nolan, Raymond Anthony. “Clean my land: American Indians, tribal sovereignty, and the Environmental Protection Agency.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Kansas State University. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20509.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nolan, Raymond Anthony. “Clean my land: American Indians, tribal sovereignty, and the Environmental Protection Agency.” 2015. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Nolan RA. Clean my land: American Indians, tribal sovereignty, and the Environmental Protection Agency. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20509.

Council of Science Editors:

Nolan RA. Clean my land: American Indians, tribal sovereignty, and the Environmental Protection Agency. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20509

18. Lozier, Jean-François. In Each Other’s Arms: France and the St. Lawrence Mission Villages in War and Peace, 1630-1730.

Degree: 2012, University of Toronto

Beginning in the late 1630s, a diversity of Algonquian and Iroquoian peoples established under the auspices of Jesuit and, later, Sulpician missionaries a string of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: New France; Missions; Aboriginals; Native Americans; Ethnohistory; War; 0334; 0578; 0337; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Lozier, J. (2012). In Each Other’s Arms: France and the St. Lawrence Mission Villages in War and Peace, 1630-1730. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36291

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lozier, Jean-François. “In Each Other’s Arms: France and the St. Lawrence Mission Villages in War and Peace, 1630-1730.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36291.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lozier, Jean-François. “In Each Other’s Arms: France and the St. Lawrence Mission Villages in War and Peace, 1630-1730.” 2012. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Lozier J. In Each Other’s Arms: France and the St. Lawrence Mission Villages in War and Peace, 1630-1730. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36291.

Council of Science Editors:

Lozier J. In Each Other’s Arms: France and the St. Lawrence Mission Villages in War and Peace, 1630-1730. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36291


University of Toronto

19. Otis, Melissa. At Home in the Adirondacks: A Regional History of Indigenous and Euroamerican Interactions, 1776 - 1920.

Degree: 2013, University of Toronto

This dissertation is a social history of Algonquian and Iroquoian people in the Adirondacks of New York State, a rural, borderlands region that shares geography… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: First Nations; Native American; Iroquois; Algonquian; Abenaki; New York; borderlands; Quebec; Akwesasne; Odanak; environmental history; rural history; contact history; ethnically mixed; wilderness; hunting territory; family history; guiding; hunting; trapping; fishing; artefacts; frontier violence; boarding house; entrepreneur; class; performance; basket making; beadwork; acting; encampment; pageant; tourism; social history; microhistory; ethnohistory; 0740; 0337; 0334; 0814; 0323; 0326; 0324; 0304; 0503; 0510; 0631; 0628

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APA (6th Edition):

Otis, M. (2013). At Home in the Adirondacks: A Regional History of Indigenous and Euroamerican Interactions, 1776 - 1920. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70118

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Otis, Melissa. “At Home in the Adirondacks: A Regional History of Indigenous and Euroamerican Interactions, 1776 - 1920.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70118.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Otis, Melissa. “At Home in the Adirondacks: A Regional History of Indigenous and Euroamerican Interactions, 1776 - 1920.” 2013. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Otis M. At Home in the Adirondacks: A Regional History of Indigenous and Euroamerican Interactions, 1776 - 1920. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70118.

Council of Science Editors:

Otis M. At Home in the Adirondacks: A Regional History of Indigenous and Euroamerican Interactions, 1776 - 1920. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70118

20. Parsons, Christopher. Plants and Peoples: French and Indigenous Botanical Knowledges in Colonial North America, 1600 – 1760.

Degree: 2012, University of Toronto

As North American plants took root in Parisian botanical gardens and regularly appeared in scientific texts in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, they retained their… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Environment; Botany; Colonialism; Colonial Science; Indigenous Knowledge, Traditional Ecological Knowledge; Atlantic World; Jesuits; Natural History; New France; French North America; 0334; 0337; 0509; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Parsons, C. (2012). Plants and Peoples: French and Indigenous Botanical Knowledges in Colonial North America, 1600 – 1760. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36212

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parsons, Christopher. “Plants and Peoples: French and Indigenous Botanical Knowledges in Colonial North America, 1600 – 1760.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36212.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parsons, Christopher. “Plants and Peoples: French and Indigenous Botanical Knowledges in Colonial North America, 1600 – 1760.” 2012. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Parsons C. Plants and Peoples: French and Indigenous Botanical Knowledges in Colonial North America, 1600 – 1760. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36212.

Council of Science Editors:

Parsons C. Plants and Peoples: French and Indigenous Botanical Knowledges in Colonial North America, 1600 – 1760. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/36212

21. Casimirri, Giuliana. Outcomes and Prospects for Collaboration in Two Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Forest Management Negotiations in Ontario.

Degree: 2013, University of Toronto

Successful intercultural natural resource management collaboration is challenged by divergent worldviews and power disparities. Studies of non-intercultural collaboration efforts demonstrate that good outcomes emerge when… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: collaborative natural resource management; intercultural collaboration; forest management; Aboriginal; Aboriginal-state relations; forest conflict; worldview; cross-cultural negotiation; negotiation; consensus building evaluation; 0478; 0366; 0740

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APA (6th Edition):

Casimirri, G. (2013). Outcomes and Prospects for Collaboration in Two Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Forest Management Negotiations in Ontario. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/43515

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casimirri, Giuliana. “Outcomes and Prospects for Collaboration in Two Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Forest Management Negotiations in Ontario.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/43515.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casimirri, Giuliana. “Outcomes and Prospects for Collaboration in Two Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Forest Management Negotiations in Ontario.” 2013. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Casimirri G. Outcomes and Prospects for Collaboration in Two Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Forest Management Negotiations in Ontario. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/43515.

Council of Science Editors:

Casimirri G. Outcomes and Prospects for Collaboration in Two Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Forest Management Negotiations in Ontario. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/43515

22. Allsup, Andrew. Queer indigenous rhetorics: decolonizing the socio-symbolic order of Euro-American gender and sexual imaginaries.

Degree: MA, Communication Studies, 2015, Kansas State University

 This thesis explores the rhetorical function of creative writing being written by queer/two-spirit identified indigenous authors. The rhetorical function being the way these stories politicize… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Queer theory; Indigenous studies; Native studies; Psychoanalysis; Rhetorical theory; Communication (0459); Comparative Literature (0295); Ethnic Studies (0631); Gender Studies (0733); GLBT Studies (0492); Literature (0401); Multicultural education (0455); Native American Studies (0740); Women's Studies (0453)

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APA (6th Edition):

Allsup, A. (2015). Queer indigenous rhetorics: decolonizing the socio-symbolic order of Euro-American gender and sexual imaginaries. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20414

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allsup, Andrew. “Queer indigenous rhetorics: decolonizing the socio-symbolic order of Euro-American gender and sexual imaginaries.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20414.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allsup, Andrew. “Queer indigenous rhetorics: decolonizing the socio-symbolic order of Euro-American gender and sexual imaginaries.” 2015. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Allsup A. Queer indigenous rhetorics: decolonizing the socio-symbolic order of Euro-American gender and sexual imaginaries. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20414.

Council of Science Editors:

Allsup A. Queer indigenous rhetorics: decolonizing the socio-symbolic order of Euro-American gender and sexual imaginaries. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/20414

23. Chapman, Christopher Stephen. Particularly Responsible: Everyday Ethical Navigation, Concrete Relationships, and Systemic Oppression.

Degree: 2012, University of Toronto

In this dissertation, I articulate what I call a personal-is-political ethics, suggesting that the realm of human affairs long called ethics is inseparable from that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: systemic oppression; ethics; performativity; différance; governmentality; subjectification; relationality; taking responsibility; power/knowledge; accountability; personal-is-political; deconstruction; narrative practice; racism; sexism; ableism; colonialism; decolonization; whiteness; masculinity; abuse; harm; invitational practice; complicity; reflexivity; self-critique; resonance; pedagogy; flows of becoming; queer theory; disability studies; critical social work; therapy; power; ethical narrative; political rationality; treatment violence; mad studies; antipsychiatry; psychology; gendered peer abuse; abuse intervention; abuse perpetration; intentional states; friendship; auto-ethnography; critical pedagogy; An Ethics Inaccessible to Liberalism; 0733; 0626; 0452; 0740; 0628; 0422; 0998; 0340; 0451; 0622; 0384

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APA (6th Edition):

Chapman, C. S. (2012). Particularly Responsible: Everyday Ethical Navigation, Concrete Relationships, and Systemic Oppression. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32679

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chapman, Christopher Stephen. “Particularly Responsible: Everyday Ethical Navigation, Concrete Relationships, and Systemic Oppression.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32679.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chapman, Christopher Stephen. “Particularly Responsible: Everyday Ethical Navigation, Concrete Relationships, and Systemic Oppression.” 2012. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Chapman CS. Particularly Responsible: Everyday Ethical Navigation, Concrete Relationships, and Systemic Oppression. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32679.

Council of Science Editors:

Chapman CS. Particularly Responsible: Everyday Ethical Navigation, Concrete Relationships, and Systemic Oppression. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32679

.