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You searched for subject:( unmeasured prelude). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Australian National University

1. Odermatt, Ariana. Historical performance practice of the prélude non mesuré and its relationship to recording and performance .

Degree: 2018, Australian National University

‘A Prelude is a free composition, in which the imagination gives rein to any fancy that may present itself’ (François Couperin: L'art de toucher Le Clavecin, 1716) The enigmatic prélude non mesuré was a short-lived genre characterised by rhythmically free croches blanches (‘flagged white notes’, rather than white quavers) and sweeping lines and slurs that were generally notated without specific reference to rhythm or metre. Some of the lines appear to bind the tones into harmonic groups and to articulate cadential and rhythmic units, but the inherent freedom encoded in the notation presents a broad, complex interpretive scope to present-day performers. Given composers' scant written and notational indications as to how they intended the works to be performed, this research seeks to address ways of interpreting the genre in an informed historical sense, whilst surveying current performing practices within Louis Couperin’s Prélude non mesuré in D minor to inform the author’s own performance. Extant préludes non mesurés are contained within two manuscript sources (Parville and Bauyn), while commentary addressing performance interpretation of the notation is limited to three source documents specifically referencing the prélude non mesuré: Nicolas Lebègue’s preface to his Pièces de clavessin (1677), correspondence between Lebègue and an Englishman called Mr. William Dundass (1684), and the preface to François Couperin’s L’art de toucher Le Clavecin (1716). Lebègue and F. Couperin note the difficulty of creating a prelude accessible to all keyboardists. These prefaces present four stylistic aspects pertinent to the current enquiry: 1) restriking chords, 2) note placement, 3) line interpretations and 4) rhythmic variety. Given the limited scope of period performance instructions and the nebulous form of notation characteristic of the form, this dissertation considers a significant work in the genre—Louis Couperin’s Prélude non mesuré in D minor—in light of Lebègue and F. Couperin’s commentaries on the manuscript notation. As a means of informing contemporary performing practices, this study draws on period commentary and notational practices evident in the manuscripts, building an analytical framework that explores contemporary interpretive approaches to the prélude non mesuré. This structure underpins the analysis of selected recordings by a representative sample of distinguished artists from early to contemporary recordings, including Ruggero Gerlin, Gustav Leonhardt, Colin Tilney, Skip Sempé and Christophe Rousset. In addition, the research reflects upon the author's practical application of the analytical findings through performance. The process will apply knowledge derived from the analysis of the five contemporary recordings based on the period performance instructions to…

Subjects/Keywords: Prélude non Mesuré; unmeasured prelude; harpsichord; Louis Couperin

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APA (6th Edition):

Odermatt, A. (2018). Historical performance practice of the prélude non mesuré and its relationship to recording and performance . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/148878

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Odermatt, Ariana. “Historical performance practice of the prélude non mesuré and its relationship to recording and performance .” 2018. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/148878.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Odermatt, Ariana. “Historical performance practice of the prélude non mesuré and its relationship to recording and performance .” 2018. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Odermatt A. Historical performance practice of the prélude non mesuré and its relationship to recording and performance . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/148878.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Odermatt A. Historical performance practice of the prélude non mesuré and its relationship to recording and performance . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/148878

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of South Carolina

2. Schoelen, Christopher. To Prelude (v.): The Art of Preluding and Applications for the Modern Classical Guitarist.

Degree: Degree of Doctor of Musical Arts in Music Performance, Art, 2019, University of South Carolina

In Western classical music, there are many types of compositions; some examples include sonatas, symphonies, fugues, and motets, each with a particular form. The prelude stands out as one of the few classical music forms in which the title can also be used as a verb. This is not frequently seen with other compositional types; there is never a case of “sonata-ing,” and an orchestra cannot suddenly burst into “symphony-ing.” However, there is a practice known as preluding. Historically, preluding was a common improvisational practice although many musicians today are unfamiliar with the tradition. Generally unexplored, preluding has played an influential role in the evolution of Western classical compositions and music education. In these pages, the history of preluding will be revealed, starting from the Middle Ages and continuing through the twenty-first century. In the Renaissance and Baroque periods, preluding was especially important to plucked-stringed instruments such as the lute, an ancestor of the guitar. Lutenists would prelude in order to tune their strings and adjust their frets before a performance. Many of today’s guitarists are unaware of this practice but creating and performing preludes in concert can help their performances acquire aspects of immediacy and spontaneity. This study will look at the history of preluding with the goal of helping modern guitarists practice this art and be able to implement these ideas into performance situations. Advisors/Committee Members: Christopher Berg.

Subjects/Keywords: Music Performance; Prelude; Modern; classical; guitarist; preluding; french keyboardists; unmeasured preludes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schoelen, C. (2019). To Prelude (v.): The Art of Preluding and Applications for the Modern Classical Guitarist. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/5250

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schoelen, Christopher. “To Prelude (v.): The Art of Preluding and Applications for the Modern Classical Guitarist.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Carolina. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/5250.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schoelen, Christopher. “To Prelude (v.): The Art of Preluding and Applications for the Modern Classical Guitarist.” 2019. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Schoelen C. To Prelude (v.): The Art of Preluding and Applications for the Modern Classical Guitarist. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of South Carolina; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/5250.

Council of Science Editors:

Schoelen C. To Prelude (v.): The Art of Preluding and Applications for the Modern Classical Guitarist. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of South Carolina; 2019. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/5250

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