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You searched for subject:( spiritual knowing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Queens University

1. Gerhardt-Strachan, Karina. ‘To recover a sense of the sacred in ourselves and in everything around us’: Exploring the place of spirituality in Canadian health promotion .

Degree: Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queens University

The field of health promotion advocates a socioecological approach to health which addresses a wide variety of physical, social, environmental, political and cultural factors. Encouraging a holistic approach, health promotion examines many aspects of health and well-being, including physical, mental, sexual, community, social and ecological health. Despite this holism, there is a noticeable absence of discussion surrounding spirituality and spiritual health in the discipline of health promotion. For this thesis project, I was interested in exploring how leading scholars in the field of health promotion, in Canada, understand the place of spirituality in health promotion. Using the fourth edition of Health Promotion in Canada (Rootman et al., 2017) as my sampling frame of recognized leaders in the field, I conducted thirteen semi-structured qualitative interviews with authors from the book. Situated within a critical health promotion approach which utilizes methodologies aiming for social justice, equity and ecological sustainability, I intend to open up possibilities for centering spiritual epistemologies and other ways of knowing that have been marginalized, such as Indigenous understandings of health and wellbeing. I argue that by avoiding spirituality within health promotion frameworks and education, the secularism of health promotion and its underlying values of Eurocentric knowledge production and science remain invisible and rarely critiqued. The absence of spirituality in health promotion signifies the ongoing colonialism of the field. This must be addressed if health promotion is to respond effectively to the calls to action from the Truth & Reconciliation Commission (2015), and if health promotion is to fulfill its promise of being inclusive, relevant and effective.

Subjects/Keywords: spirituality; spiritual health; health promotion; ways of knowing

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APA (6th Edition):

Gerhardt-Strachan, K. (n.d.). ‘To recover a sense of the sacred in ourselves and in everything around us’: Exploring the place of spirituality in Canadian health promotion . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/25957

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gerhardt-Strachan, Karina. “‘To recover a sense of the sacred in ourselves and in everything around us’: Exploring the place of spirituality in Canadian health promotion .” Thesis, Queens University. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/25957.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gerhardt-Strachan, Karina. “‘To recover a sense of the sacred in ourselves and in everything around us’: Exploring the place of spirituality in Canadian health promotion .” Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Gerhardt-Strachan K. ‘To recover a sense of the sacred in ourselves and in everything around us’: Exploring the place of spirituality in Canadian health promotion . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/25957.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Gerhardt-Strachan K. ‘To recover a sense of the sacred in ourselves and in everything around us’: Exploring the place of spirituality in Canadian health promotion . [Thesis]. Queens University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/25957

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


University of Waikato

2. Bright, Deborah Ann. Exploring female art-making through reflective practice: A multi-dimensional cultural, spiritual and embodied experience .

Degree: 2010, University of Waikato

This thesis explores some of the many elements and influences of lived experience that are present in acts of art-making. Reflective practice in art-making adds the intentional and purposive act of reflective learning to the experience of art-making. In an academic context the challenge arises for a researcher to adequately represent the breadth and richness of the lived experiences of reflective practice in artmaking. This breadth and richness may embrace elements of art production and influences including gender, culture, spirituality, creativity, creative processes, embodied knowing, the place of conversations and learning as a result of facilitated reflective practice. Adequate representation is particularly vital because art-makers may communicate best through non-verbal means, including embodied knowing and their artmaking, rather than through words. Flexibility of approach and representation is even more important when the art-maker participants engage in various art-making areas and identify themselves as part of indigenous, dominant and/or non-dominant cultures within Aotearoa New Zealand. In this thesis, by applying a feminist participatory approach, informed by kaupapa Maori, I affirmed that the lived experiences of reflective practice in art-making can be adequately represented in a thesis. By such means, I sought to empower the participants, including myself, by providing a process through which they might increase confidence in their own art-making practices and professional artistry. This approach was necessary because no single or even double blending of worldviews can embrace such a range of variables. However, an interweaving of feminist and participatory, informed by indigenous peoples’ worldviews, provides the scope for such a study in terms of fundamental beliefs, ways of knowing, values, issues of power, methodologies and methods. The ways of knowing include collaborative, constructed, cultural, embodied, experiential, indigenous, presentational, propositional, spiritual and subjective and writing as a way of knowing; such a range was vital to this thesis. As artmaker co-participant, I was able to engage in conversation with the other art-makers as facilitator of their reflective practice in art-making and to represent their lived experiences of reflective practice in art-making through verbal and non-verbal means and art-making, in ways that were comfortable culturally to all participants. ii I represent and discuss my findings through formal academic writing, personal narrative and a DVD. The DVD includes a video montage and an image narrative that contribute to the discussion on embodied knowing (Chapter 7), a video of my own dance work, which contributes to the discussion on creativity and visual images (Chapter 6), and a copy of a poster referred to at various times in the findings and discussion chapters. Finally, I conclude that a feminist participatory approach, informed by indigenous peoples’ worldviews and including facilitated reflective practice, may have application to other fields… Advisors/Committee Members: Bruce, Toni (advisor), Barbour, Karen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: female; art-making; reflective practice; ways of knowing; cultural knowing; spiritual knowing; embodied knowing; feminist worldview; participatory worldview; indigenous peoples' worldview; kaupapa Maori; dance-making; weaving; raranga; quilting; painting; pottery; music-making; design; photography; conversations; facilitated reflective practice; Adult education; creativity; commercial Maori music; feminist spirituality; feminist Christianity; Christianity and the body; Maori spirituality; creative process

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bright, D. A. (2010). Exploring female art-making through reflective practice: A multi-dimensional cultural, spiritual and embodied experience . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/4550

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bright, Deborah Ann. “Exploring female art-making through reflective practice: A multi-dimensional cultural, spiritual and embodied experience .” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/4550.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bright, Deborah Ann. “Exploring female art-making through reflective practice: A multi-dimensional cultural, spiritual and embodied experience .” 2010. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bright DA. Exploring female art-making through reflective practice: A multi-dimensional cultural, spiritual and embodied experience . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/4550.

Council of Science Editors:

Bright DA. Exploring female art-making through reflective practice: A multi-dimensional cultural, spiritual and embodied experience . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/4550


Queensland University of Technology

3. Elsworth, Jill. A women's investment club : a case study investigating the process of empowerment by active participation in a group learning environment.

Degree: 2005, Queensland University of Technology

Over the last two decades research into the notion of empowerment has been focused on the three primary dimensions of process, outcomes and environment within the contexts of the individual, community groups and business organisations. As a psychological attribute, empowerment at the individual level has been investigated significantly by such theorists as Rappaport (1995) and Zimmerman (2000). However, studies in this field neglect deep understanding of the reality of the individual's experiences of the empowerment process. Definitions within the literature refer to empowerment as being a process which occurs over time for the individual who is personally challenged to achieve power and control within his/her own life context by the application and reflection of learning new knowledge and skills. The purpose of this investigative case study is to examine the reality of the empowerment process as it occurs in the individual lives of a group of women who have actively participated in the learning environment of an investment club over a 2 year period in Brisbane. The three dimensions of empowerment support the structure of the study with the findings evidencing 'authentic empowerment' is achieved when the individual seeks to operate within the dual learning environments of the supportive group as well as the solo learning environment. The reality of individual authentic empowerment proved to be a continuum of experience dependent upon the individual's levels of motivation, energy, decision-making abilities, knowledge, risk taking, confidence, time and goals. Sustainability of empowerment related to the participant's level of active involvement in the dual learning environments while accepting complete responsibility for actions and consequences.

Subjects/Keywords: individual empowerment; adult learning; women’s ways of knowing; power; transformational learning; empowerment; self-growth; motivation; authentic empowerment; praxis; feminist pedagogy; supportive groups; investment clubs; case study; spiritual; postpositivism; constructivism.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elsworth, J. (2005). A women's investment club : a case study investigating the process of empowerment by active participation in a group learning environment. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16075/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elsworth, Jill. “A women's investment club : a case study investigating the process of empowerment by active participation in a group learning environment.” 2005. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed December 11, 2019. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16075/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elsworth, Jill. “A women's investment club : a case study investigating the process of empowerment by active participation in a group learning environment.” 2005. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Elsworth J. A women's investment club : a case study investigating the process of empowerment by active participation in a group learning environment. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2005. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16075/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Elsworth J. A women's investment club : a case study investigating the process of empowerment by active participation in a group learning environment. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2005. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16075/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.