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You searched for subject:( reader responses). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Huang, Ke. Translating for Children: Cultural Translation Strategies and Reader Responses .

Degree: 2014, University of Arizona

This study explores the cultural dimension of translating children's and adolescent literature. Framed within the theories of cultural studies, translation studies, Baktinian dialogism, and reader response theories, this study is three-fold: (1) a content analysis is conducted to identify the cultural and linguistic shifts in the translated books and the strategies utilized by the translators for making those shifts, (2) the responses of the source-text (ST) and the target-text (TT) readers are compared; (3) the potential relationship between the translation strategies and the reader responses are inferred based on the findings from (1) and (2). The expected findings are: (1) adept use of various translation strategies helps the TT readers recognize themes as similar as the ST readers; (2) some interventions may create deviating responses in the TT readers as compared with the ST readers; (3) some unique responses by either the ST or the TT readers may be as a direct result of cultural differences more than the translation strategies. The implication section provides recommendations to publishers, translators, educators, parents, teacher educators, and researchers, and suggestions for further research. Advisors/Committee Members: Short, Kathy G (advisor), Short, Kathy G. (committeemember), Yaden, David B. Jr (committeemember), Waugh, Linda R. (committeemember), Iddings, Ana C. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: content analysis; cultural studies; reader responses; translation strategies; translation studies; Language, Reading & Culture; children's literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Huang, K. (2014). Translating for Children: Cultural Translation Strategies and Reader Responses . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332832

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huang, Ke. “Translating for Children: Cultural Translation Strategies and Reader Responses .” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332832.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huang, Ke. “Translating for Children: Cultural Translation Strategies and Reader Responses .” 2014. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Huang K. Translating for Children: Cultural Translation Strategies and Reader Responses . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332832.

Council of Science Editors:

Huang K. Translating for Children: Cultural Translation Strategies and Reader Responses . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332832


Queens University

2. de Leon, Clarissa. “A Calm Arises”: An Anxious Adolescent’s Experience of Building Self-Compassion Through Aesthetic Reading .

Degree: Education, Queens University

In recent years, the Ontario Government (2013) has recognized that schools have a vital role in facilitating the prevention, intervention, and awareness of student mental wellness. Increased political attention to student mental health parallels studies that have found that 68.8% of the mental health problems in Canada have their onset in childhood and adolescence (Government of Canada, 2006). Of particular concern is anxiety since almost 5% of Canadians report experiencing threshold or subthreshold levels of Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Therefore, it is crucial that we find tools that can be used to promote mental wellness in anxious adolescents. Stories have great cultural importance because they help us explore abstract and difficult concepts and experiences. For this reason, literature provides a rich opportunity to promote mental wellness in anxious adolescents. In my study, I looked inwards at my own experiences as an anxious adolescent for insight into how reading literature can help adolescents understand and cope with their anxiety. Using autoethnography and literary anthropology as the methodologies for my study, I analyzed internal (autobiographical memories and reflections) and external (personal journals, social media posts, letters, and high school assignments) data sources from my adolescence (ages 14 to 18 years) and found that my aesthetic reading responses to literature helped me understand and cope with my anxiety by building my self-compassion. This study adds to current research investigating the relationship between anxiety and self-compassion by contributing a first-person exploration of the intersections between literacy experiences, adolescent anxiety, and self-compassion.

Subjects/Keywords: Reader-Response Theory; Aesthetic Reading Responses; Self-Compassion; Adolescent Mental Health; Adolescent Literacy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

de Leon, C. (n.d.). “A Calm Arises”: An Anxious Adolescent’s Experience of Building Self-Compassion Through Aesthetic Reading . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/23799

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

de Leon, Clarissa. ““A Calm Arises”: An Anxious Adolescent’s Experience of Building Self-Compassion Through Aesthetic Reading .” Thesis, Queens University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/23799.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

de Leon, Clarissa. ““A Calm Arises”: An Anxious Adolescent’s Experience of Building Self-Compassion Through Aesthetic Reading .” Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

de Leon C. “A Calm Arises”: An Anxious Adolescent’s Experience of Building Self-Compassion Through Aesthetic Reading . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/23799.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

de Leon C. “A Calm Arises”: An Anxious Adolescent’s Experience of Building Self-Compassion Through Aesthetic Reading . [Thesis]. Queens University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/23799

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

3. Dahlström, Jenny. Internet language in user-generated comments : Linguistic analysis of data from four commenting groups.

Degree: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), 2013, Karlstad University

The present study examines typical features of internet language found in user-generated comments collected from commenting groups from four online magazines aimed at different readerships: (1) adult women (Working Mother and Mothering), (2) adult men (Esquire), (3) young women (Seventeen) and (4) young men (Gameinformer). Approximately 5,000 words from each commenting group were collected, creating a 21,087 word corpus which was analyzed with regard to typographic (emoticons, nonstandard typography of and, personal pronouns you and I) and orthographic features (abbreviations, acronyms) as well as syntactic and stylistic features resembling spoken language (contracted forms, ellipsis of subject and/or verb and commenting tone). The results show that adult men wrote the longest comments, followed by adult women, young men and young women in descending order. Furthermore, as for the typical features regarding typography and orthography, it was found that among the four commenting groups, adult men and adult women used them very sparsely, young men used them occasionally and young women used the features most frequently. The analysis of tone showed that adult men mostly used an aggressive or neutral tone, while adult women, young women and young men mostly used a friendly or neutral tone. Young women used an aggressive tone more often than adult women and young men. Moreover, regarding the syntactic and stylistic features, results revealed that the young men were the most frequent users of ellipsis of subject and/or verb, followed by adult women, young women and adult men. Contracted forms were used extensively in the potential places of contractions, regardless of commenting group. Since young men used the ellipsis of subject and/or verb most frequently of all commenting groups and also used the contracted forms in all potential places of contractions, the conclusion is that the young men used a style that is closer to spoken English than the three other commenting groups.

Den här studien undersöker språkdrag som är typiska för språk på internet. Det material som har undersöks har hämtats från användarkommentarer i nättidningar som är riktade till fyra olika läsargrupper: (1) kvinnor (Working Mother, Mothering), (2) män (Esquire), (3) unga kvinnor (Seventeen) och (4) unga män (Gameinformer). Cirka 5 000 ord hämtades från kommentarsfälten för varje tidning, vilket resulterade i en korpus som omfattade 21 087 ord totalt. Korpusen analyserades med hänsyn till typografiska språkdrag (smileys, ickestandardiserad stavning av personliga pronomen I och you samt and) och ortografiska språkdrag (förkortningar, akronymer) samt syntaktiska och stilistiska språkdrag som påminner om talspråk (sammandragningar, ellips av subjekt och/eller predikatsverb, tonläge). Resultaten visade att män skrev de längsta kommentarerna, följda av kvinnor, unga män och unga kvinnor i fallande ordning. Vad…

Subjects/Keywords: asynchronous CMC; internet language; netspeak; chatspeak; user-generated content; user-generated comments; reader responses; gender

…readers’ responses to both proprietor content and other user-generated content (Walther and… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dahlström, J. (2013). Internet language in user-generated comments : Linguistic analysis of data from four commenting groups. (Thesis). Karlstad University. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26993

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dahlström, Jenny. “Internet language in user-generated comments : Linguistic analysis of data from four commenting groups.” 2013. Thesis, Karlstad University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26993.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dahlström, Jenny. “Internet language in user-generated comments : Linguistic analysis of data from four commenting groups.” 2013. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Dahlström J. Internet language in user-generated comments : Linguistic analysis of data from four commenting groups. [Internet] [Thesis]. Karlstad University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26993.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Dahlström J. Internet language in user-generated comments : Linguistic analysis of data from four commenting groups. [Thesis]. Karlstad University; 2013. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26993

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.