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You searched for subject:( planum temporale). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Boston University

1. Chin, Jamie A. Examining morphological differences in Heschl's gyrus between neurotypical and dyslexic brains.

Degree: MS, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2020, Boston University

Current methods of diagnosis for developmental dyslexia rely on family history report and cognitive and language behavioral testing. However, relying on these measures alone to predict dyslexia in at-risk children can result in low sensitivity and specificity, with dyslexic individuals either being missed or over-identified. Prediction accuracy could be increased by considering structural differences in the dyslexic brain along with behavioral measures. Reduplication of Heschl’s gyrus, where the primary auditory cortex resides, has been suggested as a risk factor for developing dyslexia. The current investigation explored if differences in interhemispheric duplication patterns and gray matter volume of Heschl’s gyrus could distinguish between dyslexic and neurotypical (control) brains. A detailed labeling protocol based on macroanatomical landmarks and explicitly defined reduplication morphotypes: single Heschl’s gyrus (SH), common stem duplication (CSD), complete posterior duplication (CPD), and multiple duplication (MD) was developed. Overall, there was no significant difference in the incidence of morphotypes between control and dyslexic brains. Duplication of Heschl’s gyrus was a common occurrence in both groups. However, results suggest that the MD morphotype may occur more often in dyslexic brains. Gray matter volume of anterior Heschl’s gyrus was larger in the left hemisphere in both groups but tended to be larger overall in dyslexic brain. Results of this investigation confirmed the presence of high morphological variability between and within brains and suggest that reduplications in Heschl’s gyrus alone are not enough to designate between neurotypical and dyslexic brains. It is likely that developmental dyslexia has heterogeneous origins, and it is possible that increased gyrification combined with other structural differences is one possible origin. Advisors/Committee Members: Perrachione, Tyler K. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Speech therapy; Planum temporale

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APA (6th Edition):

Chin, J. A. (2020). Examining morphological differences in Heschl's gyrus between neurotypical and dyslexic brains. (Masters Thesis). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41502

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chin, Jamie A. “Examining morphological differences in Heschl's gyrus between neurotypical and dyslexic brains.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Boston University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41502.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chin, Jamie A. “Examining morphological differences in Heschl's gyrus between neurotypical and dyslexic brains.” 2020. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Chin JA. Examining morphological differences in Heschl's gyrus between neurotypical and dyslexic brains. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Boston University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41502.

Council of Science Editors:

Chin JA. Examining morphological differences in Heschl's gyrus between neurotypical and dyslexic brains. [Masters Thesis]. Boston University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41502


University of Melbourne

2. Martens, Marilee A. Williams Syndrome: links between brain, cognition, and behaviour.

Degree: 2005, University of Melbourne

The interrelationships between brain, cognition, and behaviour are complex but can be more clearly characterised by studying disorders with an underlying genetic basis. This thesis examined these interrelationships in the context of Williams syndrome (WS), a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder that affects aspects of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The principal aims of this thesis were to evaluate the cognitive, behavioural, and neuroanatomical profile of WS individuals and to explore the relationships between aspects of the cognitive and behavioural profile and the neuroanatomical changes that are evident in WS. Three general hypotheses, and 10 specific hypotheses, were postulated as a means of exploring these aims. The first general hypothesis predicted that WS individuals would demonstrate distinct features within their cognitive and behavioural profile. Specifically, it was predicted that WS individuals would show relative strengths on verbal tasks and significant deficits on visuospatial and mathematical tasks, in contrast to control participants who were predicted to show a more even profile. It was also predicted that WS individuals would show evidence of heightened affect in response to music and demonstrate hypersociability as compared to control participants

Subjects/Keywords: Williams Syndrome; amygdala; planum temporale; primiary auditory cortex; corpus callosum; music; hypersociability

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APA (6th Edition):

Martens, M. A. (2005). Williams Syndrome: links between brain, cognition, and behaviour. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38737

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martens, Marilee A. “Williams Syndrome: links between brain, cognition, and behaviour.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38737.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martens, Marilee A. “Williams Syndrome: links between brain, cognition, and behaviour.” 2005. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Martens MA. Williams Syndrome: links between brain, cognition, and behaviour. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38737.

Council of Science Editors:

Martens MA. Williams Syndrome: links between brain, cognition, and behaviour. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38737


University of Arizona

3. Wong, Bryan M. Planum Temporale: Morphologic Taxonomy of the Superior Temporal Plane .

Degree: 2019, University of Arizona

Background: Planum Temporale (PT) is a crucial neuroauditory structure located in the dorsal superior temporal plane (STP) posterior to Heschl’s gyrus (HG). The PT has been implicated in complex auditory function and is well known for its preponderance of leftward asymmetry in normal brains and classic “pie- shaped” morphology. While a majority of cases have easily identifiable PT and HG, there exist some cases in which distinguishability of these two structures is difficult due to morphological variation. The goal of this study is to create a taxonomy of PT morphological features in order to improve the sometimes difficult identification and differentiation of PT from surrounding structures. Methods: A total of 50 (100 hemispheres) healthy intact, high-resolution T1- weighted brain MRIs were obtained from Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) and included in this retrospective study. There were 28 women and 22 men, all right-handed. Ages ranged from 18-57 (mean=26.44) years. A 3D cortical surface mesh (grey matter) for each brain was generated using FreeSurfer and manipulated to view the STP using BrainVISA Anatomist neuroimaging software. The PT was isolated from surrounding structures based on pre-defined anatomical criteria and subsequent surface area measurements, linear measurements and qualitative measures were made. Results: A total of four PT configurations were identified: (1) Pie-shaped [45%], (2) Trapezoid-shaped [27%], (3) Rectangular-shaped [19%], and (4) None [9%]. Mean surface areas of measurable PT configurations were: 511.96 mm2 for “Pie-shaped” (n=45), 517.36 mm2 for “Trapezoid-shaped” (n=27) and 472.12mm2 for “Rectangular-shaped” (n=19). The fourth category, “None” (n=9), was not calculable. There were significantly more “Trapezoid-shaped” PTs in females (p<.05). The “None” category occurred significantly more in males (p<.05) and in the right hemisphere (p<.05). Furthermore, the left hemisphere demonstrated significantly greater surface area for “Pie-shaped” PTs (p<.05). Conclusion: We believe that the proposed classifications is the first step in creating a comprehensive taxonomy of the STP. This will aid neuroanatomists, clinicians and students in terms of differentiation of sometimes complex topography of the STP. Advisors/Committee Members: Musiek, Frank (advisor), Fuglevand, Andrew (committeemember), Cone, Barbara (committeemember), Kielar, Aneta (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: auditory cortex; heschls gyrus; planum temporale; superior temporal plane; taxonomy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wong, B. M. (2019). Planum Temporale: Morphologic Taxonomy of the Superior Temporal Plane . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636683

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wong, Bryan M. “Planum Temporale: Morphologic Taxonomy of the Superior Temporal Plane .” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636683.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wong, Bryan M. “Planum Temporale: Morphologic Taxonomy of the Superior Temporal Plane .” 2019. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wong BM. Planum Temporale: Morphologic Taxonomy of the Superior Temporal Plane . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636683.

Council of Science Editors:

Wong BM. Planum Temporale: Morphologic Taxonomy of the Superior Temporal Plane . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636683

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