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1. Furness, Jane Amanda. The contribution of family literacy programmes to the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities .

Degree: 2012, University of Waikato

Approaches to literacy education named as ‘family literacy programmes’ first emerged in Aotearoa New Zealand in the early 2000s amidst considerable enthusiasm. Such approaches involve adults, children, or both in literacy learning in the contexts of home and family life. They are part of a wider field, established internationally, of academic and practical endeavour encompassing studies of the literacy practices of family members, studies of parents’ support of children’s literacy development, and studies of programmes aimed at enhancing family members’ literacy abilities, and the evaluations of such programmes. It is a contentious field, with divergent views of what constitutes both literacy and family, leading to differing expectations of what programmes are for and what they might achieve. From a moral perspective, hopes for such approaches, which hold much intuitive and culturally-located appeal, must be set against the concerning disparities in wellbeing between different groups, evident and growing in New Zealand as elsewhere. The study set out to explore the effects of a range of family-focused approaches in New Zealand, and their characteristics that seemed important in achieving relevant and meaningful outcomes for participants and their families. An important aim of the study was to encourage the essential conversation concerning the ideological and research-informed basis on which policies and practices should be developed to best suit our contexts, and that have people’s overall wellbeing, as well as their literacy development, in mind. The study traced the experiences of nineteen mainly Māori, Pacific and Pākehā adult participants in four varying family-focused literacy programmes located in different kinds of communities, drawing on Kaupapa Māori methodologies in its approach. Conversational interviews with the adult participants, programme staff and others who knew the participants well, repeated over 18 months, as well as participant observations of programme sessions and programme documentation, formed an extensive data set for latent theoretical thematic analysis. I identified literacy and other changes in the participants’ lives; synergistic links between factors influencing the programme effects, ‘flow on’ of effects to wider aspects of the participants’ lives and to their families and communities, and links to the personal, relational and collective wellbeing of individuals, families and communities. The findings demonstrate that there are complex influences on programmes such that effects are highly individualised, but that there is nevertheless a tangible, discernable process in play as people journey from participation to wellbeing, in which literacy enhancement, familiarity with new literacies, and new uses of literacies, are involved. The study suggests a disjuncture between current literacy education policy and the hopes, aspirations and real lives of many people for whom the programmes are intended and who wish to contribute to their families and communities despite their complex and… Advisors/Committee Members: Robertson, Neville (advisor), Hunter, Judy (advisor), May, Stephen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Adult Literacy Strategy; basic skills; deficit; discourse; diversity; citizenship; co-construction; collectivism; colonisation; community psychology; confidence; Cook Island; critical; critical theory; critique; culture; cultural identity; education; efficacy; empowerment; European; foundation learning; foundation skills; four component model; health; identity; ideology; ideological model; autonomous model; illiteracy; individualism; independence; interdependence; Learning for Living; literacy crisis; Key Competencies Framework; Kenan model; knowledge society; marginalisation; mental health; multiliteracies; multimodality; New Literacy Studies; numeracy; oral language development; outcomes; participation; phenomenology; power; psychological wellbeing; ripple effects; Samoa; school; self-determination; self-efficacy; sense of community; social capital; social cohesion; social constructionism; social-contextual; social exclusion; social identities; social inclusion; social inequalities; social justice; social network; social support; social wellbeing; sociocultural; spirituality; strengths; strengths-based; teaching; tino rangitiratanga; Tonga; Treaty of Waitangi; typology; Whare Tapa Wha; whanau; whanaungatanga; workplace; worldview; borderlands; embedded; whanau literacy programmes; idiosyncratic; interconnected; contextualised; methodological fundamentalism

…introduces the reader to its methodological orientation. The theoretical framework used throughout… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Furness, J. A. (2012). The contribution of family literacy programmes to the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6457

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Furness, Jane Amanda. “The contribution of family literacy programmes to the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6457.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Furness, Jane Amanda. “The contribution of family literacy programmes to the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities .” 2012. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Furness JA. The contribution of family literacy programmes to the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6457.

Council of Science Editors:

Furness JA. The contribution of family literacy programmes to the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6457

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