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You searched for subject:( metacognitive skill). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Queensland University of Technology

1. Bozorgian, Hossein. Metacognitive strategy instruction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) listening skill.

Degree: 2012, Queensland University of Technology

Listening skill is allocated inadequate consideration in English language instruction and learning in Iran. At the school level, listening skill is not taught but reading and writing skills are taught traditionally. At the college level, reading skill is emphasised. For students seeking IELTS certification, institutes teach listening skill within the framework of a Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) approach. Nonetheless, despite the official syllabus, many teachers tend to test rather than teach listening skill. Currently, listening skill in the curriculum is embedded in an oral comprehension teaching approach through multiple choice written responses in the institutes. Therefore, the process of explicitly teaching listening is overlooked with a strong emphasis on the post hoc assessment of the products of listening. This study used a mixed methods approach to investigate the relationship between metacognitive strategy instruction and listening performance, metacognitive awareness and use of metacognitive strategies in listening. Three research questions were addressed in this study: - Is there a relationship between metacognitive strategy instruction (planning, monitoring and evaluation) and Iranian High Intermediate students¡¦ listening? „ - Is there a relationship between metacognitive strategy instruction and Iranian High Intermediate students¡¦ metacognitive awareness of listening? - Does metacognitive strategy instruction help Iranian High Intermediate students¡¦ use of metacognitive strategies during listening? A single group (N = 30) of High Intermediate level tertiary students in Iran were guided through a metacognitive strategy instruction over one semester (10 weeks). The first research question was measured through IELTS listening tests, which tracked any change of students’ listening performance. The second research question was analysed through results of a Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ) to survey students’ awareness of metacognitive strategies in listening. Finally, the third research question was analysed through interviews, which explored students’ use of metacognitive strategies in listening. Results indicate that High Intermediate students developed listening performance, but there were no significant changes in metacognitive awareness in listening. Students reported in the interviews that they used multiple strategies (cognitive and metacognitive) to approach listening. Implications for English teaching in Iran and other contexts are discussed.

Subjects/Keywords: listening skill; foreign/second language learning; metacognition; metacognitive strategy instruction; second language

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bozorgian, H. (2012). Metacognitive strategy instruction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) listening skill. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/54724/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bozorgian, Hossein. “Metacognitive strategy instruction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) listening skill.” 2012. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed April 04, 2020. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/54724/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bozorgian, Hossein. “Metacognitive strategy instruction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) listening skill.” 2012. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Bozorgian H. Metacognitive strategy instruction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) listening skill. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2012. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/54724/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bozorgian H. Metacognitive strategy instruction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) listening skill. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2012. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/54724/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Klafehn, Jennifer. Cultural competence: implications for validity, measurement, and performance.

Degree: PhD, 0338, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Findings from research in educational and cognitive psychology have shown that metacognition, defined as the monitoring and regulation of one’s knowledge and learning processes (Flavell, 1979), exerts substantial influence on individual performance (Swanson, 1990). The majority of this research, however, has only examined metacognitive skill as it applies to academic settings (Tobias & Everson, 2002; Veenman & Spaans, 2005). Other contexts, such as cross-cultural settings, may equally benefit from such applications. This dissertation contributes to research on metacognition in two distinct ways: (1) by examining the construct validity of a popular self-report measure of cultural metacognition, and (2) by examining the effects of a new performance-based measure of metacognitive skill on performance in cross-cultural settings. Results from Study 1 indicated that cultural metacognition is distinct from the Big Five, but that the measure of cultural metacognition is highly correlated with other subfacets of cultural competence. Results from Study 2 were largely inconclusive due to low statistical power and methodological concerns with the performance-based measure of metacognition, however, post hoc analyses illuminated some potential relationships between cross-cultural adaptation and personality. Implications for the use of measures of cultural metacognition in future research and organizational contexts are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Newman, Daniel A. (advisor), Chiu, Chi-Yue (Committee Chair), Newman, Daniel A. (committee member), Drasgow, Fritz (committee member), Gelfand, Michele J. (committee member), Hong, Ying-Yi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: cross-cultural performance; cultural competence; metacognition; metacognitive skill; personality; assessment

…learning scenarios has demonstrated that metacognitive skill plays a significantly larger role in… …metacognitive skill and learning performance has been repeatedly shown to be moderated by task… …complexity, such that metacognitive skill influences performance only for those tasks which are… …marker of metacognitive skill, and the RPM have shown this not to be the case (Stankov… …beliefs, experiences, and expectations. 13 Metacognitive skill is especially important in… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Klafehn, J. (2012). Cultural competence: implications for validity, measurement, and performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34246

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Klafehn, Jennifer. “Cultural competence: implications for validity, measurement, and performance.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed April 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34246.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Klafehn, Jennifer. “Cultural competence: implications for validity, measurement, and performance.” 2012. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Klafehn J. Cultural competence: implications for validity, measurement, and performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34246.

Council of Science Editors:

Klafehn J. Cultural competence: implications for validity, measurement, and performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34246


University of Guelph

3. Houde, Sebastien. The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence .

Degree: 2014, University of Guelph

Although a growing body of evidence has looked at the beneficial impact of mindfulness practice in a number of domains (e.g., improvement of mental health and psychological well-being, physical health, behavioral regulation, relationship and social interaction quality; see Baer, 2003; Brown et al., 2007), very little empirical research has been conducted or focused on the role that mindfulness could play in better understanding intercultural relations and related issues (e.g., intercultural competence development and training, intercultural adaptation and effectiveness). As such, the purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the relationship between mindfulness and intercultural competence, and more specifically investigate the extent to which there exists a direct or indirect relationship between these constructs. Although empirical evidence suggests that numerous mechanisms could be at play (see Shapiro et al., 2006), there are no theories or models specifically looking at the construct of mindfulness and the means by which it could potentially impact the development of intercultural competence. By drawing on the seminal work of Shapiro et al. (2006), two studies were conducted to test an integrative framework to highlight the presence of such a relationship and investigate the mediating role played by these different mechanisms, including (a) decentering, (b) exposure, (c) flexibility/rigidity, (d) self-regulation/self-management, and (e) value clarification. After steps were taken to ensure that the measurement properties of the different indices or psychometric instruments were meeting an acceptable standard across both studies, results generally indicated that mindfulness was indeed related to a number of intercultural competence indices, and that this relationship tended to be partially mediated by a number of mediating variables or mechanisms of action (i.e., exposure, flexibility/ rigidity, self-regulation/self-management, and value-clarification). Overall, these results tend to suggest that applying the mindfulness framework to the study of intercultural competence is likely to generate a number of interesting insights and greatly benefit both research and practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Desmarais, Serge (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: mindfulness; culture; cultural competence; intercultural competence; intercultural skills; mindful; mindfulness practice; mindless; cultural intelligence; mechanism of action; mechanism; intercultural training; cross-cultural training; cultural sensitivity; learning culture; mindful leadership; expatriation; intercultural adaptation; cultural adaptation; international assignment; cross-cultural expertise; workforce diversity; international management; global business management; cross-cultural interaction; cultural empathy; universality; diversity; universal attitude; intercultural effectiveness; cross-cultural effectiveness; foreign assignment; personel selection; training; training and development; cultural sense-making; multicultural attitude; multicultural values; pluralistic values; pluralistic attitudes; intercultural adjustment; cross-cultural adjustment; awareness; cultural awareness; mindful awareness; FFMQ; five-factor mindfulness questionnaire; theoretical framework; mediation; structural equation modeling; relative weight analysis; relative importance analysis; present-focused; orientation to experience; exposure; psychological flexibility; cognitive flexibility; decentering; reperceiving; phenomenological attitude; shift in perspective; mechanisms of mindfulness; emotional flexibility; behavioral flexibility; rigidity; cultural flexibility; self-regulation; self-management; behavioral regulation; emotional regulation; self-compassion; authenticity; ethnocultural empathy; perspective-taking; stereotyping; stereotype; acceptance; value clarification; benefits of mindfulness; multicultural competence; multicultural skills; multicultural abilities; dispositional mindfulness; non-judgment; non-reactivity; reactivity; global worldview; cross-cultural adaptation; ethnocentric; cultural tolerance; ethnorelative; openness to experience; openness; universality-diversity orientation; relativistic appreciation; acceptance of cultural differences; cultural differences; cultural frame switching; non-judgmental; non-evaluative; cultural metacognition; metacognitive skill; cultural skills; cultural knowledge; acting with awareness; AAQ; frustration intolerance; discomfort intolerance; experiential avoidance; comfort with differences; emotion regulation; common humanity; unbiased; unbiased processing; positive psychology; five facet mindfulness questionnaire; experience questionnaire; frustration discomfort scale; universality-diversity scale; acceptance and action questionnaire; international compence; mindful organization; organizing framework; adaptive performance; cross-cultural performance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Houde, S. (2014). The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence . (Thesis). University of Guelph. Retrieved from https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Houde, Sebastien. “The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence .” 2014. Thesis, University of Guelph. Accessed April 04, 2020. https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Houde, Sebastien. “The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence .” 2014. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Houde S. The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Guelph; 2014. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Houde S. The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence . [Thesis]. University of Guelph; 2014. Available from: https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.