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You searched for subject:( habitat saturation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Miami University

1. Lucia, Kristen E. PHILOPATRY IN PRAIRIE VOLES: AN EVALUATION OF THE HABITAT SATURATION HYPOTHESIS.

Degree: MS, Zoology, 2007, Miami University

Philopatry, or delayed dispersal of sexually mature offspring, may be due to ecological constraints on dispersal. In this study I manipulated the population density of prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) living in experimental enclosures to test the predictions of the habitat saturation hypothesis that philopatry and subsequent group formation in this cooperatively breeding mammal is affected by the availability of suitable territories. A significantly greater proportion of offspring remained philopatric at high densities, with females being more philopatric than males at all densities. This increase in philopatry led to a significant increase in the proportion of social units that were groups as well as a significant increase in group size. These results provide the strongest evidence for a mammal of a causal affect of density on dispersal and group formation and suggest that habitat saturation is at least a partial explanation for philopatry in prairie voles. Advisors/Committee Members: Keane, Brian (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Habitat saturation; prairie voles; ecological constraints; philopatry; dispersal

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APA (6th Edition):

Lucia, K. E. (2007). PHILOPATRY IN PRAIRIE VOLES: AN EVALUATION OF THE HABITAT SATURATION HYPOTHESIS. (Masters Thesis). Miami University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=miami1186167337

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lucia, Kristen E. “PHILOPATRY IN PRAIRIE VOLES: AN EVALUATION OF THE HABITAT SATURATION HYPOTHESIS.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Miami University. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=miami1186167337.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lucia, Kristen E. “PHILOPATRY IN PRAIRIE VOLES: AN EVALUATION OF THE HABITAT SATURATION HYPOTHESIS.” 2007. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lucia KE. PHILOPATRY IN PRAIRIE VOLES: AN EVALUATION OF THE HABITAT SATURATION HYPOTHESIS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Miami University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=miami1186167337.

Council of Science Editors:

Lucia KE. PHILOPATRY IN PRAIRIE VOLES: AN EVALUATION OF THE HABITAT SATURATION HYPOTHESIS. [Masters Thesis]. Miami University; 2007. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=miami1186167337


Cornell University

2. Yip, Eric. Costs And Benefits Of Group Living In An Unusual Social Spider, Delena Cancerides .

Degree: 2012, Cornell University

Virtually all spiders are predators, and many are cannibalistic. Of the handful of species that tolerate conspecifics and sustain long-term associations, nearly all spin a web or silken retreat. Previous research on these social spiders showed that many of the benefits they derive from group living depend on these silken structures. The social huntsman spider of Australia, Delena cancerides, is the exception and only lives under the bark of trees. I studied the costs and benefits of group living in this species, given that many of the benefits ascribed to other species are impossible without a web, in three contexts: (1) predator defense, (2) foraging, and (3) dispersal. I examined predator defense by introducing potential predators into field colonies that had been manipulated to allow observations and into captive colonies in the laboratory. The single adult female of the colony was the primary defender of the colony, while younger spiders were ineffective at repelling predators. I examined foraging by observing natural prey capture in the field, introducing prey into field colonies, and recording the condition of field spiders at the time of collection. Spiders predominantly foraged individually; however, some prey captured inside the retreat was shared, and younger iii spiders benefited from sharing prey captured by their older siblings. I examined dispersal into neighboring colonies through a combination of allozyme analyses and direct observations in the field and laboratory. Young spiders can and do immigrate into foreign colonies; however, older spiders were usually attacked in foreign colonies, and thus their dispersal options are constrained. Through the use of nest boxes, I showed that competition for a new bark retreat is intense and that spiders should wait in their natal retreat until they are larger and better competitors for a new retreat. Together, these data show that the bark retreat is indeed critical to the social biology of D. cancerides. Without the web some forms of cooperation found in other social spiders never evolved, yet the reliance on a rare bark retreat also promotes group cohesion, as is found in many social vertebrates. iv Advisors/Committee Members: Reeve, Hudson Kern (committeeMember), Seeley, Thomas Dyer (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Aggression; cooperation; competition; foraging; habitat saturation; predation; social; spider

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yip, E. (2012). Costs And Benefits Of Group Living In An Unusual Social Spider, Delena Cancerides . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31019

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yip, Eric. “Costs And Benefits Of Group Living In An Unusual Social Spider, Delena Cancerides .” 2012. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yip, Eric. “Costs And Benefits Of Group Living In An Unusual Social Spider, Delena Cancerides .” 2012. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Yip E. Costs And Benefits Of Group Living In An Unusual Social Spider, Delena Cancerides . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yip E. Costs And Benefits Of Group Living In An Unusual Social Spider, Delena Cancerides . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31019

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Zeng, Lijin. Social Behavior and Cooperative Breeding of Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in Hawai'i.

Degree: Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, 2014, University of California – Riverside

Cooperative breeding is an evolutionarily curious behavior, because helpers appeared to altruistically forgo opportunity for their own reproduction. In a population of Kalij Pheasants Lophura leucomelanos introduced to Hawai'i, we recorded cooperative breeding behaviors including caring for chicks, defending against conspecific intruders, and vigilance against predators. While cooperative breeding mostly occurs in altricial species, in which offspring need substantial parental care to survive, such behavior in the precocial Kalij Pheasants with relatively independent offspring provides an excellent opportunity to examine cooperative breeding and its influencing factors without the constraint of intense offspring needs. In our study population, Kalij pheasants formed stable social groups that usually contained one female and one to six males, and larger groups maintained larger year-round home ranges in general. One male was dominant among others within a social group, and age was the only factor found to determine dominance, indicating helpers can possibly stay in social groups and queue for dominance. Because high density was observed, we hypothesized that breeding habitat may be saturated, and that subordinate males cannot establish independent breeding habitat and subsequently remain in social groups. The removal of about one third of social groups resulted in a significant decrease in number and proportion of multiple male groups, and suggested that habitat saturation contributed to cooperative breeding in this population. To examine if helpers gained genetic benefits, we used 12 autosomal microsatellites and applied relatedness and parentage analyses to 88 adult and 82 offspring samples. On one hand, we found 34.4% subordinate males were related to the dominant male of the social group, indicating some helpers can gain inclusive fitness by helping kin. On the other hand, subordinate males fathered 16.5% of offspring sampled, suggesting that helpers can gain direct fitness be participate in reproduction. These results helped to understand the maintenance of cooperative breeding in this population; however, the causes for cooperative breeding can be complex in reality. In addition to examined factors, group-living benefits and life history traits may also have played a role in cooperative breeding in Kalij Pheasants.

Subjects/Keywords: Ecology; Behavioral sciences; Evolution & development; Cooperative breeding; Direct benefit; Habitat saturation; Kalij Pheasant; Kin selection; Removal experiment

…and proportion of multiple male groups, and suggested that habitat saturation contributed to… …56 Chapter 2: Habitat Saturation Contributes to the Cooperative Breeding of the Kalij… …surrounding areas. Among ecological constraints, habitat saturation (Selander 1964; Brown 1987… …In the second chapter, I tested the hypotheses that habitat saturation and mate limitation… …the high density in the population suggested potential habitat saturation, I removed about… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zeng, L. (2014). Social Behavior and Cooperative Breeding of Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in Hawai'i. (Thesis). University of California – Riverside. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4c27h313

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zeng, Lijin. “Social Behavior and Cooperative Breeding of Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in Hawai'i.” 2014. Thesis, University of California – Riverside. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4c27h313.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zeng, Lijin. “Social Behavior and Cooperative Breeding of Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in Hawai'i.” 2014. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Zeng L. Social Behavior and Cooperative Breeding of Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in Hawai'i. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Riverside; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4c27h313.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zeng L. Social Behavior and Cooperative Breeding of Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in Hawai'i. [Thesis]. University of California – Riverside; 2014. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4c27h313

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.