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You searched for subject:( global worldview). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Carton, Adam D. Environmental Worldview and Faith in Science as Moderators of the Relationship between Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2010, Georgia State University

Global climate change (GCC) may be the most pressing social and environmental issue of our time. The use of fossil fuels tops the list of human behaviors that contribute to GCC. Several ‘alternative’ energy sources are now being considered in an effort to mitigate GCC, including—controversially—nuclear energy. Examined here were environmental worldview and faith in science as moderators of the relationship between beliefs about and attitudes toward nuclear energy (ATNE). Participants were 272 college students who completed an on-line survey. Predictor variables were beliefs about whether nuclear energy contributes to GCC (GCC-beliefs) and to energy independence (EI-beliefs). Results indicated that environmental worldview moderated the negative relationship between GCC-beliefs and ATNE. Results implied that the effectiveness of arguments salient to the current nuclear energy debate concerning GCC have a medium effect on ATNE except when people are more ecocentric in their environmental worldviews. Advisors/Committee Members: Marci Culley, Julia Perilla, Gabriel Kuperminc.

Subjects/Keywords: Climate change; Global warming; Attitudes; Beliefs; Nuclear energy; Faith in science; Environmental worldview; Community psychology; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carton, A. D. (2010). Environmental Worldview and Faith in Science as Moderators of the Relationship between Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/73

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carton, Adam D. “Environmental Worldview and Faith in Science as Moderators of the Relationship between Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy.” 2010. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed March 30, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/73.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carton, Adam D. “Environmental Worldview and Faith in Science as Moderators of the Relationship between Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy.” 2010. Web. 30 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Carton AD. Environmental Worldview and Faith in Science as Moderators of the Relationship between Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Mar 30]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/73.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Carton AD. Environmental Worldview and Faith in Science as Moderators of the Relationship between Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Nuclear Energy. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/psych_theses/73

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Mason, Thomas J, Jr. An Analysis of the Decline in Long-Term Study Abroad Participation Among Students at Elite U.S. Universities, with a Focus on Japan.

Degree: PhD, East Asian Languages and Literatures, 2019, The Ohio State University

The purpose of this study is to determine why students at U.S. elite universities prefer to study abroad in Japan in short-term (8 weeks or less) programs rather than the traditional mid-length (more than 8 weeks but no more than 1 semester) and long-term (longer than 1 semester or quarter) programs. Although participation in study abroad among U.S. students to all destinations has increased by approximately 45% over the last decade, almost all of the increase comes from short-term programs. Conversely, mid-length and long-term programs have experienced steep declines in enrollment, dropping from 41% of total number of students studying abroad to just 36.6% and from 5.3% to just 2.4%, respectively, over the same period. The decrease in enrollment is a problem because extended participation and experience in the foreign country where the language is spoken and culture practiced aids the journey to high cultural and linguistic competency in a foreign language and culture (Davidson, 2010; Dwyer, 2004; MacAloon, 2008; Medina-Lopez-Portillo, 2004; Kehl and Morris, 2008; Zorn, 1996). Using a mixed-methods approach, 112 1st- and 2nd-year Japanese-language students at elite U.S. universities and 22 Japanese-language instructors were surveyed on the study abroad decision process, followed by seven interviews with respondents who volunteered to participate in the subsequent qualitative phase. Study findings clearly show that Japanese-language students at elite U.S. universities (a) have a strong interest in studying abroad in Japan, (b) mainly wish to study abroad to improve their Japanese-language skills and gain proficiency in the Japanese culture, and (c) are hesitant to study abroad in Japan in mid-length and long-term programs because they fear they lack time in their undergraduate curriculum and worry that appropriate courses needed for an on-time graduation are unavailable abroad. Importantly, no significantly statistical difference emerged between science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors and non-STEM majors in their reasons for hesitating to study abroad in mid-length and long-term programs, contrasting with a commonly held belief that the decline is, in part, due to the greater number of students majoring in STEM. Recommended future research includes a longitudinal study that would follow respondents to determine whether they ultimately studied abroad or spent time abroad in other forms, and then, determining if students who chose to study abroad and those who do not differ in engagement with Japan throughout their careers. Advisors/Committee Members: Noda, Mari (Committee Co-Chair), Jian, Xiaobin (Committee Co-Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian Studies; Education; Foreign Language; Sociology; study abroad; education abroad; internationalization; globalization; global education; academic year abroad; international education; Japan; undergraduate; elite students; worldview; college choice; language learning; Japanese; pedagogy

…11 ix 2.2.2 Outcomes in Comparison to Program Length: Personal Development and Worldview… …Development and Worldview, and 2.2.3 Outcomes in Comparison to Program Length: Culture and Language… …greater rate of campuswide internationalization and global engagement. 2.2 Outcomes 2.2.1… …terminology: personal development, worldview, and language and cultural proficiency. Combining… …abroad have beneficial gains in their personal development, worldview, and academic commitment… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mason, Thomas J, J. (2019). An Analysis of the Decline in Long-Term Study Abroad Participation Among Students at Elite U.S. Universities, with a Focus on Japan. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1556805857911929

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mason, Thomas J, Jr. “An Analysis of the Decline in Long-Term Study Abroad Participation Among Students at Elite U.S. Universities, with a Focus on Japan.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed March 30, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1556805857911929.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mason, Thomas J, Jr. “An Analysis of the Decline in Long-Term Study Abroad Participation Among Students at Elite U.S. Universities, with a Focus on Japan.” 2019. Web. 30 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Mason, Thomas J J. An Analysis of the Decline in Long-Term Study Abroad Participation Among Students at Elite U.S. Universities, with a Focus on Japan. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2019. [cited 2020 Mar 30]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1556805857911929.

Council of Science Editors:

Mason, Thomas J J. An Analysis of the Decline in Long-Term Study Abroad Participation Among Students at Elite U.S. Universities, with a Focus on Japan. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2019. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1556805857911929


University of Guelph

3. Houde, Sebastien. The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence .

Degree: 2014, University of Guelph

Although a growing body of evidence has looked at the beneficial impact of mindfulness practice in a number of domains (e.g., improvement of mental health and psychological well-being, physical health, behavioral regulation, relationship and social interaction quality; see Baer, 2003; Brown et al., 2007), very little empirical research has been conducted or focused on the role that mindfulness could play in better understanding intercultural relations and related issues (e.g., intercultural competence development and training, intercultural adaptation and effectiveness). As such, the purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the relationship between mindfulness and intercultural competence, and more specifically investigate the extent to which there exists a direct or indirect relationship between these constructs. Although empirical evidence suggests that numerous mechanisms could be at play (see Shapiro et al., 2006), there are no theories or models specifically looking at the construct of mindfulness and the means by which it could potentially impact the development of intercultural competence. By drawing on the seminal work of Shapiro et al. (2006), two studies were conducted to test an integrative framework to highlight the presence of such a relationship and investigate the mediating role played by these different mechanisms, including (a) decentering, (b) exposure, (c) flexibility/rigidity, (d) self-regulation/self-management, and (e) value clarification. After steps were taken to ensure that the measurement properties of the different indices or psychometric instruments were meeting an acceptable standard across both studies, results generally indicated that mindfulness was indeed related to a number of intercultural competence indices, and that this relationship tended to be partially mediated by a number of mediating variables or mechanisms of action (i.e., exposure, flexibility/ rigidity, self-regulation/self-management, and value-clarification). Overall, these results tend to suggest that applying the mindfulness framework to the study of intercultural competence is likely to generate a number of interesting insights and greatly benefit both research and practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Desmarais, Serge (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: mindfulness; culture; cultural competence; intercultural competence; intercultural skills; mindful; mindfulness practice; mindless; cultural intelligence; mechanism of action; mechanism; intercultural training; cross-cultural training; cultural sensitivity; learning culture; mindful leadership; expatriation; intercultural adaptation; cultural adaptation; international assignment; cross-cultural expertise; workforce diversity; international management; global business management; cross-cultural interaction; cultural empathy; universality; diversity; universal attitude; intercultural effectiveness; cross-cultural effectiveness; foreign assignment; personel selection; training; training and development; cultural sense-making; multicultural attitude; multicultural values; pluralistic values; pluralistic attitudes; intercultural adjustment; cross-cultural adjustment; awareness; cultural awareness; mindful awareness; FFMQ; five-factor mindfulness questionnaire; theoretical framework; mediation; structural equation modeling; relative weight analysis; relative importance analysis; present-focused; orientation to experience; exposure; psychological flexibility; cognitive flexibility; decentering; reperceiving; phenomenological attitude; shift in perspective; mechanisms of mindfulness; emotional flexibility; behavioral flexibility; rigidity; cultural flexibility; self-regulation; self-management; behavioral regulation; emotional regulation; self-compassion; authenticity; ethnocultural empathy; perspective-taking; stereotyping; stereotype; acceptance; value clarification; benefits of mindfulness; multicultural competence; multicultural skills; multicultural abilities; dispositional mindfulness; non-judgment; non-reactivity; reactivity; global worldview; cross-cultural adaptation; ethnocentric; cultural tolerance; ethnorelative; openness to experience; openness; universality-diversity orientation; relativistic appreciation; acceptance of cultural differences; cultural differences; cultural frame switching; non-judgmental; non-evaluative; cultural metacognition; metacognitive skill; cultural skills; cultural knowledge; acting with awareness; AAQ; frustration intolerance; discomfort intolerance; experiential avoidance; comfort with differences; emotion regulation; common humanity; unbiased; unbiased processing; positive psychology; five facet mindfulness questionnaire; experience questionnaire; frustration discomfort scale; universality-diversity scale; acceptance and action questionnaire; international compence; mindful organization; organizing framework; adaptive performance; cross-cultural performance

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Houde, S. (2014). The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence . (Thesis). University of Guelph. Retrieved from https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Houde, Sebastien. “The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence .” 2014. Thesis, University of Guelph. Accessed March 30, 2020. https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Houde, Sebastien. “The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence .” 2014. Web. 30 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Houde S. The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Guelph; 2014. [cited 2020 Mar 30]. Available from: https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Houde S. The Application of the Mindfulness Framework to the Study of Intercultural Competence . [Thesis]. University of Guelph; 2014. Available from: https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/8251

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.