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You searched for subject:( civilian aid). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Mitchell, John "David" F. NGO insecurity in high-risk conflict zones: the politicization of aid and its impact on “humanitarian space”.

Degree: PhD, Security Studies Interdepartmental Program, 2016, Kansas State University

Attacks against nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in high-risk conflict zones have increased exponentially over the last two decades. However, the few existing empirical studies on NGO insecurity have tended to focus on external factors influencing attacks, with little attention paid to the actions of aid workers themselves. To fill this gap, this dissertation theorizes that aid workers may have contributed to their own insecurity by engaging in greater political action. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are used to assess the impact of political activity by NGOs on the insecurity of aid workers. The quantitative analyses test the theory at two levels. The first is a large-N country-level analysis of 117 nations from 1999 to 2015 using panel corrected standard errors. The second is a subnational-level statistical analysis of four case studies: Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, and Colombia from 2000 to 2014. Both the country- and provincial- level analyses show that the magnitude of aid tends to be a significant determinant of aid worker security. The qualitative methods of “structured-focused comparison” and “process tracing” are used to analyze the four cases. Results show that aid workers are most likely to be victims of politically-motivated attacks while in-transit. Consistent with the quantitative findings, it is speculated that if workers are engaged in a large-scale project over an extended period of time, attackers will be able to monitor their daily activities and routines closely, making it easier to orchestrate a successful ambush. Furthermore, the analysis reveals that political statements made by NGOs—regardless of their sectors of activity—have increased insecurity for the broader aid community. These results dispel the myth that humanitarian activity has historically been independent, impartial, and neutral. Several NGOs have relied on this false assumption for security, believing that adherence to core principles has contributed to “humanitarian space.” The results also dispel the popular NGO assumption that targeted attacks are not official tactics of organized militants, but rather the result of criminality or mistaken identity. In fact, the overwhelming majority of aid workers attacked in high-risk conflict zones have been targeted by political actors. Advisors/Committee Members: Emizet F. Kisangani.

Subjects/Keywords: Aid worker security; Humanitarianism; Human rights; International development; Nongovernmental organizations; Civilian casualties

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APA (6th Edition):

Mitchell, J. ". F. (2016). NGO insecurity in high-risk conflict zones: the politicization of aid and its impact on “humanitarian space”. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/34145

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mitchell, John "David" F. “NGO insecurity in high-risk conflict zones: the politicization of aid and its impact on “humanitarian space”.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Kansas State University. Accessed November 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/34145.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mitchell, John "David" F. “NGO insecurity in high-risk conflict zones: the politicization of aid and its impact on “humanitarian space”.” 2016. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Mitchell J"F. NGO insecurity in high-risk conflict zones: the politicization of aid and its impact on “humanitarian space”. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/34145.

Council of Science Editors:

Mitchell J"F. NGO insecurity in high-risk conflict zones: the politicization of aid and its impact on “humanitarian space”. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kansas State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/34145

2. Leuthauser, Elizabeth Leigh. Responding to civilian bloodshed: Investigating the relationship between one-sided violence and aid.

Degree: 2012, Iowa State University

Do foreign aid flows respond to signals of need? This thesis explores the potential relationship between one-sided violence and foreign aid donations. I argue that one-sided violence operates as a signal to the international community, indicating that a state is in need of aid. Utilizing foreign aid as a means of understanding international response, I execute a series of empirical tests to establish if such a relationship can be confirmed. While conclusive determination of the relationship was not obtained, I provide the foundations for future avenues of research for one-sided violence and foreign aid.

Subjects/Keywords: civilian conflict; civilian violence; foreign aid; humanitarian aid; international response; one-sided violence; International Relations; Political Science

…1 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION Introduction What causes a state to increase aid flows in a… …reaction from the international community, as measured by official development aid flows. I will… …exist between one-sided violence and foreign aid. As the body of research on conflict and… …in need of aid or intervention. This means of communication is the fundamental chore of a… …speculation, I investigate a new potential relationship: the connection between foreign aid and one… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Leuthauser, E. L. (2012). Responding to civilian bloodshed: Investigating the relationship between one-sided violence and aid. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/12379

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Leuthauser, Elizabeth Leigh. “Responding to civilian bloodshed: Investigating the relationship between one-sided violence and aid.” 2012. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed November 21, 2019. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/12379.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Leuthauser, Elizabeth Leigh. “Responding to civilian bloodshed: Investigating the relationship between one-sided violence and aid.” 2012. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Leuthauser EL. Responding to civilian bloodshed: Investigating the relationship between one-sided violence and aid. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/12379.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Leuthauser EL. Responding to civilian bloodshed: Investigating the relationship between one-sided violence and aid. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2012. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/12379

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Australian National University

3. Mollaun, Alicia Hayley. US Aid to Pakistan: Nation-Building and Realist Objectives in the Post 9/11 Era .

Degree: 2016, Australian National University

The United States (US) has always used its aid program as a strategic lever in foreign policy. In the early days of aid, it was used to prosecute the Cold War. Now aid supports the United States in its effort to win the war on terror. Aid is used both to pursue short-term or “realist” objectives (e.g., to win support for US foreign policy goals) and long-term or “nation-building” ones (e.g. to strengthen governance). The trade-offs and tensions between these goals have been examined for the Cold War period (e.g., Seitz 2012), but not the post 9/11 one. This research takes a case-study approach and examines US aid to Pakistan. It is based primarily on interviews with the Pakistani and American elite collected in Pakistan between October 2011 and October 2013 and the United States in March 2012. The period of research (2011-2013) is one in which the Obama Administration tried to pivot its relationship with Pakistan away from a focus on realist objectives (principally, the war in Afghanistan) towards nation-building ends, for example, through a much larger civilian aid program to improve Pakistan’s governance and the economy. This thesis examines the success of that pivot, and argues it was limited, on three main grounds First, both groups of elite view Pakistan’s challenges are mostly nation-building in nature, and particularly related to its economy (and, in the case of the Pakistani elite, internal security needs). But both groups nevertheless perceive that the US still primarily wants cooperation on countering terrorism and in Afghanistan. Second, the leverage and goodwill that US aid provides is seen to be undermined by the pursuit of its realist objectives. Third, US aid is seen by many in the elite as targeted at the elite not the masses. Some interesting differences in views between the two groups of elite are observed. In general, more importance was attached to nation-building objectives by US respondents than by Pakistani respondents. For example, US respondents were more likely to think that the US was concerned with trying to improve Pakistani governance and was trying to influence public opinion in Pakistan, whereas Pakistani respondents viewed US aid as much less concerned with governance and more directed to the Pakistani elite. Despite these differences, which are suggestive of at least a genuine US intent to engage in nation-building, the findings of the thesis point to a failure by the Obama Administration to follow through on its nation-building objectives in Pakistan. Nation-building floundered, it is argued, because of ongoing disputes in relation to realist goals, especially in relation to the war on Afghanistan. Several published studies of US-Pakistan relations argue for a further nation-building push. In my…

Subjects/Keywords: Pakistan; Pakistan studies; United States; US-Pakistan relations; Foreign Aid; 9/11; Nation-Building; Realism; US foreign Policy; Pakistani foreign policy; Pakistan military; Pakistan economy; Pakistan development; Foreign Policy; war on terror; terrorism; elite; civilian aid; Obama Administration; Bush Administration; India; Afghanistan; winning 'hearts and minds'; public opinion; development studies; perceptions of foreign aid; elite interviews; USAID; State Department; wicked problem; Kerry Lugar Berman Act; motivations for giving foreign aid; objectives of foreign aid; aid conditionality; aid and leverage

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mollaun, A. H. (2016). US Aid to Pakistan: Nation-Building and Realist Objectives in the Post 9/11 Era . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mollaun, Alicia Hayley. “US Aid to Pakistan: Nation-Building and Realist Objectives in the Post 9/11 Era .” 2016. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed November 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mollaun, Alicia Hayley. “US Aid to Pakistan: Nation-Building and Realist Objectives in the Post 9/11 Era .” 2016. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Mollaun AH. US Aid to Pakistan: Nation-Building and Realist Objectives in the Post 9/11 Era . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mollaun AH. US Aid to Pakistan: Nation-Building and Realist Objectives in the Post 9/11 Era . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.