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You searched for subject:( Waikato Region). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Waikato

1. Old, Clare. An investigation into the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato Region .

Degree: 2011, University of Waikato

The Waikato region is home to approximately 16% of New Zealand’s total population, and is the country’s fourth largest regional economy. The region contributes 9.1% of the nation’s GDP and 10% of New Zealand exports. The industries which are most important to the Waikato region are dairy farming, electricity generation and distribution, mining and quarrying, forestry and logging, and education and research services. The University of Waikato has been contributing to the Waikato regional economy since 1964. It employs 2000 staff and has 13,000 enrolled students. Of the University’s domestic students, 74% come from the Waikato and Bay of Plenty regions. Thus the University creates employment for residents and attracts students from both within and outside the Waikato region. The expenditure of students in the region creates wealth for local businesses and other flow on effects, resulting in higher regional GDP. It is because of this influx of students into the region that the University provides the local economy with additional wealth. Thus there is motivation to further investigate the economic contribution of the University to the Waikato region’s economy. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato region. By building a single region input-output model it can be seen how great an impact the University has on the Waikato region. Details of local student spending were ascertained to allow multiplier effects to be determined. The larger these multiplier effects, the more valuable the University is to the local economy. This study adds to the current academic literature on this subject, and also gives a more detailed understanding of a University’s role within its local economy. This is because it includes not only the direct impacts of the University’s and its students’ activities, but also the indirect flow-on effects. The methods this paper used to construct an input-output table for the Waikato region were to create a national input-output table from the 2007 supply and use tables for New Zealand using the industry technology method. This table was then downsized to portray the Waikato region using an augmented GRIT method, which allowed for the inclusion of superior data into the table. The resulting input-output table was then used to conduct an impact analysis of the University of Waikato on its local economy. This paper has used input-output analysis to show that the University of Waikato is important to the Waikato Region both in its contribution to regional GDP and in the benefits it provides to the community such as the use of the University grounds and higher-skilled labour force it brings. The University contributes 3.4% of the Waikato Region’s GDP and provides employment both directly through its delivery of services and indirectly through its operations and spending of staff and students. If the University were to close it would have a significant negative impact both on regional GDP and more intangible losses to its local… Advisors/Committee Members: Cameron, Michael Patrick (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Input-Output; Waikato Region

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Old, C. (2011). An investigation into the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato Region . (Masters Thesis). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6029

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Old, Clare. “An investigation into the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato Region .” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Waikato. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6029.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Old, Clare. “An investigation into the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato Region .” 2011. Web. 16 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Old C. An investigation into the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato Region . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Waikato; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6029.

Council of Science Editors:

Old C. An investigation into the economic contribution of the University of Waikato to the Waikato Region . [Masters Thesis]. University of Waikato; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6029


University of Waikato

2. Qiao, Ying. Detecting signals of climatic shifts and land use change from precipitation and river discharge variations: The Whanganui and Waikato catchments .

Degree: 2012, University of Waikato

The Whanganui and Waikato river catchments have somewhat different degrees of exposure to the westerly wind systems. It is of interest to determine whether the two regions have similar times of occurrence of any concurrent shifts in river discharge and rainfall, with particular reference to mean value changes. Concurrent rainfall and runoff shifts are indicative of climatic variation but catchment land use changes (which will influence only discharge change) have also been occurring in both catchments, particularly with respect to forest planting or forest clearance. This thesis gives a summary of both climatic and land use change effects within the two catchments. If it happens that both catchments have similar climatic change-points then the data can be combined to provide a more robust framework for future water right specifications in both regions. Also, any similar responses to land use change may enable some degree of anticipation as to how future land use changes might lead to similar discharge responses. Change-points in river and rainfall time series flows were determined by an objective approach to detect breaks of slope in cumulative mass plots. Using repeated least squares fitting of piecewise linear segments, time points of maximum difference are determined as measured by the minimum least-squares in 2-segment fitting. Randomisation of time ordering of the original data was then employed to check that changes in the cumulative plots were statistically significant. Many significant but minor shifts were detected but a number of the shifts shown evidently in the rainfall and runoff cumulative mass plots. A set of change-points due to land management impacts were identified as discharge changes in the absence of concurrent rainfall changes. Rainfall-runoff linear relationship changes associate with changes in discharge time series. Change-points in rainfall and runoff times were detected at 44 flow gauges and 59 rainfall sites. There is some indication of a degree of natural geographic grouping with spatial correlation of times of discharge change. The times of the detected changes tend to cluster, with similar times for the same sign of change toward either greater or lower values of rainfall and discharge. The alternation of positive and negative signs is interesting as it was found 1981 and 1998 were times of negative shifts, while 1988 and 1994/1995 were times of positive shifts. Almost over the whole Waikato and Whanganui region, the changes in rainfall and runoff appears to relate to El Nino and La Nino events, which is of practical interest for water right considerations. The driver of the shifts in rainfall pattern was found to be the changes in high rainfall events, which can change the rainfall-runoff linear relationship in some areas. The land use component of some of the shifts was evaluated also and found only in 10 of the 44 flow gauges. The type of the land-use can be categorized into three groups: hydropower diversion, flood control system and… Advisors/Committee Members: Bardsley, W. Earl (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: change-points; climatic shifts; land use change; precipitation; discharge; Whanganui catchment; Waikato Region

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Qiao, Y. (2012). Detecting signals of climatic shifts and land use change from precipitation and river discharge variations: The Whanganui and Waikato catchments . (Masters Thesis). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6494

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Qiao, Ying. “Detecting signals of climatic shifts and land use change from precipitation and river discharge variations: The Whanganui and Waikato catchments .” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Waikato. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6494.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Qiao, Ying. “Detecting signals of climatic shifts and land use change from precipitation and river discharge variations: The Whanganui and Waikato catchments .” 2012. Web. 16 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Qiao Y. Detecting signals of climatic shifts and land use change from precipitation and river discharge variations: The Whanganui and Waikato catchments . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Waikato; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6494.

Council of Science Editors:

Qiao Y. Detecting signals of climatic shifts and land use change from precipitation and river discharge variations: The Whanganui and Waikato catchments . [Masters Thesis]. University of Waikato; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6494

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