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You searched for subject:( Trampers). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .

Degree: 2012, University of Otago

The New Zealand landmass encompasses a vast diversity of wilderness areas, including fourteen national parks and other conservation lands. These natural environments attract a large number of domestic and international visitors, who consult a many different sources of on-line and printed information before and during their visit. However, these resources are usually designed to suit a generic visitor, and take no account of the different needs and expectation of diverse individuals. In this thesis, I investigate the use of information resources by different users groups as categorized by the Wilderness Perception Scaling (WPS) method. I begin with a review of relevant studies and statistics relating to domestic and international visitors’ experiences of the New Zealand wilderness. I then report on the results of my direct observations of visitors to three destinations, and I discuss the findings that I gathered from surveys that I conducted in two of these locations. This work includes pilot studies of two sites — the Catlins Conservation Park and the Orokonui Ecosanctuary — and a more detailed study of Arthur’s Pass National Park. Following a discussion of my observations and findings, I argue for a redesign of the Department of Conservation (DOC) Website, and I present sketch ideas for a new site that is informed by mobile media interface designs. This work hints at future possibilities for smartphone applications. I conclude that current technologies allow us to address the needs and expectations of different visitors to wilderness areas. Furthermore, I argue that mobile media can enable individuals to create and share, as well as download and use, information resources that address their various and different requirements. I conclude that, if we want younger people to engage with wilderness environments, we should be using the technologies that they are using. Advisors/Committee Members: McGuire, Mark (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: WPS; Wilderness; Perceptions; Smartphone; application; DOC; website; domestic; international; visitors; statistics; tourism; carla; vieira; design; icons; iphone; mobile; socila; network; feedback; sharing; information; experiences; environments; conervation; backpack; iSite; Visitor; Centre; Trampers; Non-Purist; Moderate-Purist; Neutralist-Purist; Strong-Purist; Stankey; Kearsley; Lovelock; Highman; Wolch; Tinsley; Recreation; Orokonui-Ecosanctuary; Catlins; Outdoor-recreation; Klisley; Ho; Carr-Williams; Satisfaction; Arthur's Pass; New Zealand; National Park

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, C. C. (2012). Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. “Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. “Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .” 2012. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Vieira Avendaño CC. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548.

Council of Science Editors:

Vieira Avendaño CC. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548


Lincoln University

2. Horn Chrys. Conflict in recreation: the case of mountain-bikers and trampers.

Degree: 1994, Lincoln University

Conflict in recreation is a major problem for recreation managers who are trying to provide satisfying experiences for all recreationists. This thesis is about conflict between mountain-bikers and trampers. Mountain-biking has grown in popularity in New Zealand over the last ten years, and these increasing numbers have threatened the quality of walkers' and runners' recreational experiences, particularly in peri-urban areas. Conflict is a complex social interaction process which occurs around times of change. It involves the interplay of perceptions and attitudes, behaviour, and an incompatible situation. This complexity required the use of a range of methods to successfully understand the conflict between walkers and mountain-bikers. Like many other recreational conflicts, the conflict between bikers and trampers is asymmetrical - walkers dislike meeting bikers much more than bikers dislike meeting walkers. A majority of walker respondents disliked or strongly disliked meeting bikers on walking tracks. Walkers' questionnaire answers indicated that their greatest concerns with mountain-biking are (in order of decreasing importance) track damage and other environmental damage, personal safety, and the feeling that bikes interrupt their peace and quiet. Further exploration during in-depth interviews show that the perception of these problems are closely related to the way different users feel about that places that they use, and the way meetings with other users can be incorporated into the experiences of the recreationist. For walkers, meeting bikers is far more intrusive than vice-versa. Political activity aimed at eliminating bikers from many front country areas means that bikers are now developing a dislike of trampers who they see as intolerant and arrogant. Therefore, behaviour affects the escalation of conflict. In addition, wider social change has had an influence on this conflict. Changing economic wellbeing, less regular work hours, a perceived lack of time and a wider choice of activities have all impacted on recreation patterns in peri-urban areas, and on this conflict situation. In addition, this study has indicated that the concepts of specialisation and substitution may need modification. The use of qualitative methods has highlighted the narrow focus that researchers have used when studying these concepts. Both must be seen more broadly in the context of individuals' changing recreational needs both over the life cycle, and in the face of social change as outlined above.

Subjects/Keywords: preference; mountain-biking; motivations; conflict; goal interference; social change; substitution; specialisation theory; tramping; constraints; time deepening; Galtung Triangle; triangulation of methods; surveys; trampers; walkers; Fields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370400 Human Geography::370403 Recreation and leisure studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chrys, H. (1994). Conflict in recreation: the case of mountain-bikers and trampers. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1554

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chrys, Horn. “Conflict in recreation: the case of mountain-bikers and trampers.” 1994. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1554.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chrys, Horn. “Conflict in recreation: the case of mountain-bikers and trampers.” 1994. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Chrys H. Conflict in recreation: the case of mountain-bikers and trampers. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1554.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chrys H. Conflict in recreation: the case of mountain-bikers and trampers. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1554

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.