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You searched for subject:( Terrorist cells). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Massey University

1. Osborne, David T. H. The terrorist cell : an historical and evolutionary study of Irish terrorist cells c. 1881 - 1896.

Degree: PhD, Defence and Strategic Studies, 2013, Massey University

Within the field of terrorism studies little is understood as to how and why terrorist cells change over time and place. This is a complex question, which has evolutionary implications. That is, where do terror cells come from and why, once formed, do some succeed and some fail. To answer these questions this study uses an evolutionary methodology to analyse Victorian-era terror cells between 1881 and 1896. This was done by taking specific concepts of evolution including evolutionary variations, inheritance, diversity and selection, to model the evolutionary history of terrorist cells over time and place. In deriving this model six main evolutionary concepts were found, which were instrumental in both the planned and unplanned evolution of terrorist cells. This included, identifying adaptive characteristics that were crucial in a cell’s ability to survive and operate within a multifaceted landscape. Additional findings from this study uncovered the complex inter-dependent relationships that exist between terror cells and actors in the landscape, which resulted in uncovering sources that facilitated the evolution of cells. Ultimately, the evolutionary history model is a useful tool for understanding the evolvability of a cell and building historical and comparative reference points to better understand a terror cell’s place within the landscape.

Subjects/Keywords: Terrorists; Terrorist cells; Irish; Ireland; Great Britain; History; 19th century; Research Subject Categories::HUMANITIES and RELIGION::History and philosophy subjects::History subjects::History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Osborne, D. T. H. (2013). The terrorist cell : an historical and evolutionary study of Irish terrorist cells c. 1881 - 1896. (Doctoral Dissertation). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5761

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Osborne, David T H. “The terrorist cell : an historical and evolutionary study of Irish terrorist cells c. 1881 - 1896.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Massey University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5761.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Osborne, David T H. “The terrorist cell : an historical and evolutionary study of Irish terrorist cells c. 1881 - 1896.” 2013. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Osborne DTH. The terrorist cell : an historical and evolutionary study of Irish terrorist cells c. 1881 - 1896. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Massey University; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5761.

Council of Science Editors:

Osborne DTH. The terrorist cell : an historical and evolutionary study of Irish terrorist cells c. 1881 - 1896. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Massey University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5761


Queensland University of Technology

2. Koschade, Stuart Andrew. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.

Degree: 2007, Queensland University of Technology

The rise of the 21st Century Islamic extremist movement, which was mobilised by the al-Qaeda attacks of and responses to September 11, 2001, heralds a new period in the history of terrorism. The increased frequency and intensity of this type of terrorism affects every nation in the world, not least Australia. Rising to meet the challenges posed by terrorism is the field of terrorism studies, the field which aims at understanding, explaining, and countering terrorism. Despite the importance of the field, it has been beleaguered with criticisms since its inception as a response to the rise of international terrorism. These criticisms specifically aim at the field's lack of objectivity, abstraction, levels of research, and levels of analysis. These criticisms were the impetus behind the adoption of the methodology of this thesis, which offers the distinct ability to understand, explain, and forecast the way in which terrorists interact within covert cells. Through social network analysis, this thesis examines four terrorist cells that have operated in or against Australia. These cells are from the groups Hrvatsko Revolucionarno Bratstvo (Croatian Revolutionary Brotherhood), Aum Shinrikyo (Supreme Truth), Lashkar-e-Taiba (Army of the Pure), and Jemaah Islamiyah (Islamic Community) and operated between 1963 and 2003. Essentially, this methodology attempts to discover, map, and analyse the interaction within the cells during the covert stage of their respective operations. Following this, the results are analysed through the traditional social network analysis frameworks to discover the internal dynamics of the cell and identify the critical nodes (leaders) within the cells. Destabilisation techniques are subsequently employed, targeting these critical nodes to establish the most effective disruption techniques from a counter-terrorism point of view. The major findings of this thesis are: (1) that cells with a focus on efficiency rather than covertness were more successful in completing their objectives (contrary to popular belief); and (2) betweenness centrality (control over the flow of communication) is a critical factor in identifying leaders within terrorist cells. The analysis also offered significant insight into how a Jemaah Islamiyah cell might operate effectively in Australia, as well as the importance of local contacts to terrorist operations and the significance of international counter-terrorism cooperation and coordination.

Subjects/Keywords: terrorism; terrorist cells; terrorism studies; social network analysis; Croatian Revolutionary Brotherhood; Ustashi; Ustasha; Aum Shinrikyo; Lashkar-e-Taiba; Jemaah Islamiyah; history of terrorism; Australia; destabilisation techniques; betweenness; critical node; counter-terrorism; Willie Brigitte; Faheem Khalid Lodhi; Shoko Asahara; Imam Samudra; Muklas; Bali bombing; Islamic extremism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koschade, S. A. (2007). The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koschade, Stuart Andrew. “The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.” 2007. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed July 21, 2019. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koschade, Stuart Andrew. “The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.” 2007. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Koschade SA. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2007. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Koschade SA. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2007. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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