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Dept: Electrical and Computer Engineering  Dates: Last 2 Years

You searched for subject:( Simulink). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Bansal, Shamit. Optimal Implementation of Simulink Models on Multicore Architectures with Partitioned Fixed Priority Scheduling.

Degree: MS, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2018, Virginia Tech

Model-based design based on the Simulink modeling formalism and the associated toolchain has gained its popularity in the development of complex embedded control systems. However,the current research on software synthesis for Simulink models has a critical gap for providing a deterministic, semantics-preserving implementation on multicore architectures with partitioned fixed-priority scheduling. In this thesis, we propose to judiciously assign task offset, task priority, and task communication mechanism, to avoid simultaneous access to shared memory by tasks on different cores, to preserve the model semantics, and to optimize the control performance. We develop two approaches to solve the problem: (a) a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) formulation; and (b) a problem specific exact algorithm that may run several magnitudes faster than MILP. Advisors/Committee Members: Zeng, Haibo (committeechair), Patterson, Cameron D. (committee member), Schaumont, Patrick Robert (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Simulink; Multicore; Software Synthesis; Partitioned scheduling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bansal, S. (2018). Optimal Implementation of Simulink Models on Multicore Architectures with Partitioned Fixed Priority Scheduling. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85057

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bansal, Shamit. “Optimal Implementation of Simulink Models on Multicore Architectures with Partitioned Fixed Priority Scheduling.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85057.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bansal, Shamit. “Optimal Implementation of Simulink Models on Multicore Architectures with Partitioned Fixed Priority Scheduling.” 2018. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bansal S. Optimal Implementation of Simulink Models on Multicore Architectures with Partitioned Fixed Priority Scheduling. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85057.

Council of Science Editors:

Bansal S. Optimal Implementation of Simulink Models on Multicore Architectures with Partitioned Fixed Priority Scheduling. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85057


Colorado State University

2. Othee, Avpreet Singh. Design of control tools for use in microgrid simulations.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2018, Colorado State University

New technologies are transforming the way electricity is delivered and consumed. In the past two decades, a large amount of research has been done on smart grids and microgrids. This can be attributed to two factors. First is the poliferation of internet. Internet today is as ubiquitous as electricity. This has spawned a new area of technology called the internet of things (IoT). It gives us the ability to connect almost any device to the internet and harness the data. IoT finds use in smart grids that allow utiliy companies to deliver electricity efficiently. The other factor is the advancement in renewable sources of electricty and high power semiconductors coupled with their decreasing cost. These new sources disrupt the traditional way of electicity production and delivery, putting an increased focus on distributed power generation and microgrids. A microgrid is different from a utility grid. The difference is in the size of the grid, power level, a variety of possible sources and the way these are tied together. These characteristics lead to some unique control challenges. Today's appliances and consumer goods are powered using a standardized AC power. Thus a microrid must deliver uninterrupted and high quality power while at the same time taking into account the vastly different nature of the microsurces that produce the power. This work describes control system tools for different power converters that will be used in simulating microgrids. Simulations are important tool for any researcher. It allows researchers to test their research and theories at a greatly reduced cost. The process of design, testing and verification is an iterative process. Simulations allow a cost effective method of doing research, substituting the actual process of building experimental systems. This greatly reduces the amount of manpower and capital investment. A microgrid consists of several building blocks. These building blocks can be categorized into microsources, energy stores, converters and the loads. Microsources are devices that produce electric power. For example, a photovoltaic panel is a mirosource that produces DC power. Converters act as an interface between microsources and the grid. The constituent chapters in the document describe microsources and converters. The chapters describe the underlying control system and the simulation model of the system designed in Simulink. Some of the tools described are derived from the MATLAB/Simulink Examples library. Original authors of the simulation models and systems have been duly credited. Colorado State University has a vibrant research community. The tools described in this thesis are geared to be used for research into microgrids. The tools are developed in a simulation software called Simulink. The tools would allow future researchers to rapidly build microgrid simulations and test new control system implementations etc. The research described in the thesis builds upon the research by Han on natural gas engine based microgrid. The control tools described here are used to… Advisors/Committee Members: Young, Peter M. (advisor), Zimmerle, Daniel (committee member), Collins, George (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Microgrid; Simulink Simscape Power Systems Specialized Techology; Microgrid Control; Inverter Control

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Othee, A. S. (2018). Design of control tools for use in microgrid simulations. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191308

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Othee, Avpreet Singh. “Design of control tools for use in microgrid simulations.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191308.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Othee, Avpreet Singh. “Design of control tools for use in microgrid simulations.” 2018. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Othee AS. Design of control tools for use in microgrid simulations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191308.

Council of Science Editors:

Othee AS. Design of control tools for use in microgrid simulations. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191308


University of California – San Diego

3. Ojeda, Alejandro. Towards electromagnetic source imaging methods for developing brain-computer interface neurotherapeutics.

Degree: Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2019, University of California – San Diego

Despite several decades of research, most mental health treatments are based on pharmacological manipulations that globally affect the nervous system. Such treatments often lead to undesired side effects and short term symptomatic relief. The difficulty of diagnosing and treating mental health illnesses stems from the overwhelming complexity of the brain and is exacerbated by the fact that our ability to probe, simultaneously, the activity of dynamic and distributed brain networks is limited. In this dissertation, I propose an alternative way to tackle the mental health problem by using high-resolution imaging-based brain-computer interface (BCI) neurotechnology. I focus on new neuroimaging technology that allows us to monitor the electrical activity of cortical networks at low-cost and high spatiotemporal resolution using noninvasive electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements. This technology will serve as the ``neural decoder'' component of yet to come imaging-based closed-loop systems that can effectively restore impaired cognition. The decoder allows a BCIs to dynamically probe specific cognitive abilities of the subject in search for signatures of circuit dysfunctions. Then, various types of feedback can be designed to induce the engagement of neural populations that can compensate for the detected aberrant neuronal activity.In this dissertation, first, I develop the mathematical framework to efficiently map scalp EEG responses back into the cortical space, and by doing so, I show that the biological mechanisms responsible for the neurocognitive processes of interest are easy to study. Of theoretical and practical relevance, I demonstrate that this framework successfully unifies three of the most common problems in EEG analysis: data cleaning, source separation, and imaging. Then, I develop the algorithmic and software machinery necessary to implement high-resolution imaging-based BCIs. Finally, I analyze data from healthy adults performing a self-paced unconstrained schoolwork-like computerized task and show that within the proposed framework, I can identify brain network correlates of attention switches at a millisecond time scale. Since attention-related dysfunctions are linked to several psychiatric disorders, these results represent a step forward towards developing BCI interventions to treat several mental health illnesses.

Subjects/Keywords: Neurosciences; Bioengineering; Statistics; Brain-Computer Interface; Electroencephalogram; EEG; Empirical Bayes; Mental Health; Simulink; Source Imaging

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ojeda, A. (2019). Towards electromagnetic source imaging methods for developing brain-computer interface neurotherapeutics. (Thesis). University of California – San Diego. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/2g47n9jk

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ojeda, Alejandro. “Towards electromagnetic source imaging methods for developing brain-computer interface neurotherapeutics.” 2019. Thesis, University of California – San Diego. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/2g47n9jk.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ojeda, Alejandro. “Towards electromagnetic source imaging methods for developing brain-computer interface neurotherapeutics.” 2019. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Ojeda A. Towards electromagnetic source imaging methods for developing brain-computer interface neurotherapeutics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – San Diego; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/2g47n9jk.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ojeda A. Towards electromagnetic source imaging methods for developing brain-computer interface neurotherapeutics. [Thesis]. University of California – San Diego; 2019. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/2g47n9jk

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.