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Dept: Music  Dates: Last 2 Years

You searched for subject:( Ritual). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Minnesota

1. Christensen, Lars. The Time-Suturing Technologies of Northern Song Musicology.

Degree: PhD, Music, 2019, University of Minnesota

Scholars of ritual music in the Northern Song dynasty (960–1127) keenly sensed a temporal distance from the ancient sages that manifested as a divergence from canonical norms. To maintain a distinctive intellectual heritage and counterbalance outward-facing political and economic conditions, they located cultural identity in the idealized past. Given the overwhelming discursive importance of music, ministers and rulers alike sought to restore powerful practices and thereby transcend the boundedness of the dynastic cycle. Since their principal sources about antiquity, the textual classics, provided limited practical information about music, scholars had to supplement them with technologies grounded in linguistics, mathematics, and visualizations, which I explore in this dissertation. First, I observe how ritual music prescriptions were constituted in allusive or even paronomastic scholarly language. The Confucian principle of the rectification of names, stressing an enduring concord between words and reality, gave scholars rhetorical tools with which to critique at once society and music practices. Three case studies, treating the symbolism of the pentatonic scale, the discourse of harmony in the ritual bell-knife, and the implications of pitch metaphors, illustrate how reformers interrelated sociological commonplaces and concrete reform measures. Second, contrasting parallel mathematized and unmathematized music discourses, I trace the evolving relationship between mathematical and classical learning, showing how by Northern Song times mathematics could signify invariance. This discursive adoption afforded music reformers a precision that dovetailed elegantly with the royal prerogative of standardizing metrological systems. A case study explores the resilience of the numerical measurement of the standard pitch pipe across time and the overlapping metonymy that made it resistant to metrical reorganization. Finally, I contextualize the turn toward visual epistemology in the Northern Song in terms of classical precedent, the explosion of woodblock printing, and nascent archaeology. I compare two kinds of musical images, cosmological diagrams and prescriptive illustrations of ancient instruments. Though quite distinct in assumptions, intellectual pedigree, and style, both image types demonstrate a technology surpassing the power of text to organize, preserve, and disseminate orthodox musical practice. These technologies allowed the scholars to suture time, bringing them into more direct contact with their own exalted history.

Subjects/Keywords: Chinese music; mathematics; music theory; ritual music; Song Dynasty; temporality

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APA (6th Edition):

Christensen, L. (2019). The Time-Suturing Technologies of Northern Song Musicology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11299/206308

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Christensen, Lars. “The Time-Suturing Technologies of Northern Song Musicology.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11299/206308.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Christensen, Lars. “The Time-Suturing Technologies of Northern Song Musicology.” 2019. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Christensen L. The Time-Suturing Technologies of Northern Song Musicology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/206308.

Council of Science Editors:

Christensen L. The Time-Suturing Technologies of Northern Song Musicology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/206308

2. Ghanai, Katayoun. The Sound of Silence: An Ethnography on the Sama 'Ritual in the Nematollahi Kaneqah in Toronto.

Degree: MA -MA, Music, 2018, York University

This thesis examines the Sufi ritual of Sama as practiced by the Nematollahi order in Toronto and will explore how music induces trance in Sufis during their ceremonies called Sama. My approach is ethnomusicological. Sama, includes poetry and music through which Sufis enter into trance. The structural coupling theory may be applied to understand how Sufis participate in ritual and through active faith, undergo physical and physiological changes. The Sufis are coupled to the ritual through a common history, music, or previous participation (conditioning), practiced consciously by a group of individuals. A Samas script is never predictable; it is always improvisatory. A good Sama is when the Sufis emotional arousal matches the intensity of the music and a transcendent symbiosis occurs. Based on my interviews with the Sufis in the Nematollahi Kaneqah, each experienced the central factors of happiness, which is synonymous with well-being, however subjective this term may be. Advisors/Committee Members: Chambers, Mark K. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cultural anthropology; Music; Trance; Sama'; Kaneqah; Sufism; Wajd; Ethnography; Fana; Hal; Ecstasy; Ritual; Cultural ceremony

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ghanai, K. (2018). The Sound of Silence: An Ethnography on the Sama 'Ritual in the Nematollahi Kaneqah in Toronto. (Masters Thesis). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35474

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ghanai, Katayoun. “The Sound of Silence: An Ethnography on the Sama 'Ritual in the Nematollahi Kaneqah in Toronto.” 2018. Masters Thesis, York University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35474.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ghanai, Katayoun. “The Sound of Silence: An Ethnography on the Sama 'Ritual in the Nematollahi Kaneqah in Toronto.” 2018. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Ghanai K. The Sound of Silence: An Ethnography on the Sama 'Ritual in the Nematollahi Kaneqah in Toronto. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. York University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35474.

Council of Science Editors:

Ghanai K. The Sound of Silence: An Ethnography on the Sama 'Ritual in the Nematollahi Kaneqah in Toronto. [Masters Thesis]. York University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35474


Arizona State University

3. Lebert, Raymond Russell. Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ.

Degree: Music, 2019, Arizona State University

Subjects/Keywords: Music; Ethnography; Ethnomusicology; Jazz Studies; Music Theory; Phenomenology; Ritual Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lebert, R. R. (2019). Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ. (Masters Thesis). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/53868

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lebert, Raymond Russell. “Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Arizona State University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://repository.asu.edu/items/53868.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lebert, Raymond Russell. “Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ.” 2019. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lebert RR. Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Arizona State University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/53868.

Council of Science Editors:

Lebert RR. Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ. [Masters Thesis]. Arizona State University; 2019. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/53868

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