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You searched for subject:( Ring shout). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Gabriel, Peoples. A CIRCULAR LINEAGE: THE BAKONGO COSMOGRAM AND THE RING SHOUT OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS ON THE GEORGIAN AND SOUTH CAROLINIAN SEA ISLANDS .

Degree: 2008, Cornell University

ABSTRACT There is significant literature in the area of Africana Studies describing 'the ring shout'. However, the ring shout is not usually the primary focus. My thesis investigates the ring shout as a cultural legacy between the culture of Blacks in North America-or African Americans for purposes of this research-and Kongolese culture. It demonstrates the ways in which the ring shout of enslaved Africans and their descendants on the Georgian and South Carolinian Sea Islands not only parallels the Bakongo cosmogram, but also embodies it in three-dimensional form. The methods used include an analysis of the Bakongo culture from the Central Western coast of Africa. I use primary and secondary, anthropological, and historical sources to understand the Kongolese persistence-specifically that of the Bakongo cosmogram-in the ring shout of the Georgian and South Carolinian Sea Islanders. Shout songs and shouting will also be used as archival devices to understand how different elements such as spirituality and memory existed within the ring shout. In addition, personal accounts of the ring shout from past and present sources are used to enrich the understanding. These analyses will serve to expand what is already known about which elements from the Bakongo culture were retained and which elements were reinterpreted in the enslaved Africans' and their descendants' ring shout.

Subjects/Keywords: Cosmogram; Ring shout

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gabriel, P. (2008). A CIRCULAR LINEAGE: THE BAKONGO COSMOGRAM AND THE RING SHOUT OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS ON THE GEORGIAN AND SOUTH CAROLINIAN SEA ISLANDS . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/10769

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gabriel, Peoples. “A CIRCULAR LINEAGE: THE BAKONGO COSMOGRAM AND THE RING SHOUT OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS ON THE GEORGIAN AND SOUTH CAROLINIAN SEA ISLANDS .” 2008. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 20, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/10769.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gabriel, Peoples. “A CIRCULAR LINEAGE: THE BAKONGO COSMOGRAM AND THE RING SHOUT OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS ON THE GEORGIAN AND SOUTH CAROLINIAN SEA ISLANDS .” 2008. Web. 20 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Gabriel P. A CIRCULAR LINEAGE: THE BAKONGO COSMOGRAM AND THE RING SHOUT OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS ON THE GEORGIAN AND SOUTH CAROLINIAN SEA ISLANDS . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2008. [cited 2018 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/10769.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gabriel P. A CIRCULAR LINEAGE: THE BAKONGO COSMOGRAM AND THE RING SHOUT OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS ON THE GEORGIAN AND SOUTH CAROLINIAN SEA ISLANDS . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/10769

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Bowling Green State University

2. Washington, Erica Lanice. “Shabach Hallelujah!”:The Continuity of the Ring Shout Tradition as a Site of Music and Dance in Black American Worship.

Degree: MM, Music History, 2005, Bowling Green State University

The expressive forms that were possessed by Africans enslaved in the U.S. – such as music, dance, religion, and language – continue to be developed by many African Americans in secular and sacred contexts. This thesis will explore the ways in which dance and music are still central and are utilized particularly in Christian worship practices in black communities of faith today. The Ring Shout tradition on Southern slave plantations will be investigated for its role from the past to the present to show the continual development of its common practices throughout West Africa and the United States. Using data obtained through a field study in Toledo, Ohio, my research will test what previous scholars have concluded about the syncretism of African traditions in African American culture as it relates to music and dance within religious contexts. My field study in Toledo, Ohio, will be enhanced with observations and interviews in another field study that took place in Benin, West Africa. The juxtaposition of these two field studies demonstrates a strong connection between African American Christian worship and African religious practices that persists even today. I conclude that some practitioners of black Christianity are not cognizant that the mode of their worship is African in origin. For this reason, my research will examine why and how patterns of African American Christian liturgy have West African origins. Advisors/Committee Members: Natvig, Mary (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Music; Ring Shout; African American Worship

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Washington, E. L. (2005). “Shabach Hallelujah!”:The Continuity of the Ring Shout Tradition as a Site of Music and Dance in Black American Worship. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1131054976

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Washington, Erica Lanice. ““Shabach Hallelujah!”:The Continuity of the Ring Shout Tradition as a Site of Music and Dance in Black American Worship.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed August 20, 2018. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1131054976.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Washington, Erica Lanice. ““Shabach Hallelujah!”:The Continuity of the Ring Shout Tradition as a Site of Music and Dance in Black American Worship.” 2005. Web. 20 Aug 2018.

Vancouver:

Washington EL. “Shabach Hallelujah!”:The Continuity of the Ring Shout Tradition as a Site of Music and Dance in Black American Worship. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2005. [cited 2018 Aug 20]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1131054976.

Council of Science Editors:

Washington EL. “Shabach Hallelujah!”:The Continuity of the Ring Shout Tradition as a Site of Music and Dance in Black American Worship. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2005. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1131054976

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