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You searched for subject:( Reciprocal connection). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Indian Institute of Science

1. Rama Krishna, K. Motion Space Analysis of Smooth Objects in Point Contacts.

Degree: PhD, Faculty of Engineering, 2018, Indian Institute of Science

The present work studies instantaneous motion of smooth planar and spatial objects in unilateral point contacts. The traditional first-order instantaneous kinematic analysis is found insufficient to explain many common physical scenarios. The present work looks beyond the velocity state of motion for a comprehensive understanding through higher-order kinematic analysis of the above system. The methodology proposed herein is a Euclidean space approach to second-order motion space analysis of objects in point contacts. The geometries of the objects are approximated up to second-order in the differential vicinity of the point of contact; meaning, up to curvature at the point of contact. The instantaneous motion is approximated up to second-order kinematics, i.e., up to acceleration state. The basic approach consists of impressing an instantaneous motion upon one object while holding the other fixed which is in a single point contact initially, and observing for one of the following three states: penetration, separation, and persistence of contact between the two objects. These three states are characterized by the interference between the geometries of the objects. Penetration and separation of two curves for rotation about points on the plane is geometrically studied based on the relative configuration of the osculating circles at the point of contact. It is shown that the plane is partitioned into four regions of rotation centers. Partitioning of the plane into motion space regions at a contact provided a geometrical framework compose the motion space for multiple contacts. The applications include second-order form-closure (SFC) and synthesis of kinematic pairs. To explore the consequence of a generic motion, an analytical scheme is formulated using the screw theoretic concepts of twist and twist-derivative. It is shown that the characteristics of second-order motions at a single contact depends only upon the geometric kinematic properties of the motion; meaning, the motion characteristics are time-independent. The geometric conditions for the second-order motion that will be admissible or restrained at a contact are not available in the existing literature on \second-order mobility". The classical Euler-Savary equation for enveloping curves is found to represent the condition which is both necessary and sufficient for the second-order roll-slide motion. An elegant generalized geometric characterization of second-order motions is derived. This is made use for deriving condition of immobilization of, planar mechanisms with up to 2-degrees-of-freedom (d.o.f.), with a single point contact. Illustrative examples of four-bar and 2R-mechanisms are presented. Rapid prototyped model of the four-bar mechanism is fabricated and the SFC theory is verified satisfactorily. Through a novel use of Meusnier's theorem, rotational motion characteristics of planar curves in a point contact is used to determine the patterns and distribution of admissible axes of rotation in space for two surfaces in a single point contact. In the… Advisors/Committee Members: Sen, Dibakar (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Motion Space Analysis; Unilateral Contacts - Freedom Analysis; Second-order Mobility; Kinematic Pairs; Single Point Contact; Planar Curves; Point Contacts; Transitory Second-order Reciprocal Connection; Multiple Point Contacts; Planar Mechanisms; Mechanical Engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Rama Krishna, K. (2018). Motion Space Analysis of Smooth Objects in Point Contacts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Indian Institute of Science. Retrieved from http://etd.iisc.ac.in/handle/2005/3854

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rama Krishna, K. “Motion Space Analysis of Smooth Objects in Point Contacts.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Indian Institute of Science. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://etd.iisc.ac.in/handle/2005/3854.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rama Krishna, K. “Motion Space Analysis of Smooth Objects in Point Contacts.” 2018. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Rama Krishna K. Motion Space Analysis of Smooth Objects in Point Contacts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Indian Institute of Science; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://etd.iisc.ac.in/handle/2005/3854.

Council of Science Editors:

Rama Krishna K. Motion Space Analysis of Smooth Objects in Point Contacts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Indian Institute of Science; 2018. Available from: http://etd.iisc.ac.in/handle/2005/3854


University of South Africa

2. Scholtz, Ricardo Christian. A critical evaluation of the VAT treatment of transactions commonly undertaken by a partnership .

Degree: 2019, University of South Africa

In this dissertation, I critically evaluate the VAT treatment of common partnership transactions that are encountered during the life of a partnership. Of great significance, is that at common law a partnership is not regarded as a person, but for VAT purposes it is treated as a separate person. This creates a strong dichotomy between the general legal nature, and the VAT character of a partnership transaction. The partnership and the VAT law dichotomy, is an important theme that runs through most of the thesis. Only once I have established the nature of the transaction for VAT purposes – whether in keeping with or differing from the common law – do I apply the relevant provisions of the VAT Act to determine the VAT implications of the transaction. An important general principle is that what is supplied or acquired by the body of persons who make up the partnership, within the course and scope of its common purpose, is for VAT purposes, supplied or acquired by the partnership as a separate person. I conclude that there are difficulties and uncertainties regarding the application of the provisions of the VAT Act to various partnership transactions. For the sake of certainty and simplicity, I propose amendments to the current provisions that are relevant to partnership transactions, and also propose additional provisions. The proposed amendments seek to align with the purpose of the VAT Act and the principles upon which it is based, and also to adhere to internationally accepted principles for a sound VAT system. I also pinpoint those aspects of the VAT Act that can be clarified by the SARS in an interpretation statement. I further identify issues that require more research, eg issues arising from a partnership’s participation in cross-border trade. Advisors/Committee Members: Van Zyl, S. P (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Acquisition; Agent; Barter; Capital contribution; Consideration; Contract; Dissolution of a partnership; Distribution; Enterprise; Expense; Formation of a partnership; Going concern; Input tax; Joint ownership; Liquidation; Tax neutrality; Obligation; Output tax; Ownership; Partner; Partner’s share; Partnership; Partnership law; Partnership profits; Partnership property; Payment, person; Principal; Reciprocal connection; Reorganisation relief; Transaction; Set off; Tax simplicity; Supply; Taxable activity; Unincorporated body of persons; VAT; Vendor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scholtz, R. C. (2019). A critical evaluation of the VAT treatment of transactions commonly undertaken by a partnership . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of South Africa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10500/25988

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scholtz, Ricardo Christian. “A critical evaluation of the VAT treatment of transactions commonly undertaken by a partnership .” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Africa. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10500/25988.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scholtz, Ricardo Christian. “A critical evaluation of the VAT treatment of transactions commonly undertaken by a partnership .” 2019. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Scholtz RC. A critical evaluation of the VAT treatment of transactions commonly undertaken by a partnership . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of South Africa; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/25988.

Council of Science Editors:

Scholtz RC. A critical evaluation of the VAT treatment of transactions commonly undertaken by a partnership . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of South Africa; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/25988


University of Otago

3. Wall, Bunjong. Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation .

Degree: University of Otago

Most composition studies focus on students’ writing processes and written products without integrating reading into their research activities. More recently, researchers have acknowledged the reciprocal reading-writing relationship and begun to examine reading-to-write or discourse synthesis processes. Research shows that discourse synthesis is cognitively demanding and that most second language writers lack linguistic, mental, and sociocultural resources to perform this task effectively. Existing studies have not emphasised the role of self-directed speech as a self-regulatory strategy while students read multiple texts in order to write. This thesis addresses this gap in the literature. Informed by sociocultural theoretical notions that cognition is socially mediated and that speech is instrumental in learning and development, this qualitative multiple-case-studies thesis examined how five Thai EFL tertiary students applied their knowledge and skills, following explicit concept-based instruction on discourse synthesis, textual coherence, and argumentation. The researcher designed and delivered a four-week intervention in which the learning concepts, materials, and verbalisation were instrumental in promoting conceptual understanding and reading-to-write performance. Explicitly taught verbalisation or self-directed speech, together with learning materials specifically designed as schemes for task orientation, was a key for self-regulation as participants read multiple texts in order to compose an argument essay. The study adopted an activity theoretical framework and microgenetic analysis. The analysis aimed to describe the participants as social beings and to outline their self-regulation as it unfolded during a mediated reading-to-write activity. Data from a pre-task questionnaire on strategy use and from a post-task written self-reflection form together with video-recorded data during the end-of-intervention discourse synthesis task and interview data were triangulated to examine how reading-to-write activities were mediated and regulated. Findings were organised around four main themes: participants as readers and writers of English, essay argument structure, microgenetic findings of unfolding self-regulatory behaviour during the discourse synthesis activity, and developmental gains as perceived by the participants during concept-based instruction. The findings in this study show that participants’ reading and writing difficulties and argumentation were, in part, shaped by the social, historical and cultural factors in the Thai EFL context, and that participants’ strategic application of verbalisation and learning materials mediated their developmental changes and self-regulation. During the discourse synthesis task, participants used self-directed speech as a strategy and demonstrated varying degrees of self-regulation over various task aspects. Successful task completion indicated purposeful mediated learning with strong orientation towards the task, based on conceptual understanding, specific goals,… Advisors/Committee Members: Feryok, Anne (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: sociocultural theory; reading-to-write; writing-from-sources; discourse synthesis; microgenetic analysis; activity theory; self-regulation; verbalisation; self-directed speech; strategies; argumentation; coherence; EFL/ESL composition; academic writing; Thai EFL context; metacognition; second language writing; integrated writing task; concept-based instruction; Systemic Theoretical Instruction; Vygotsky; Gal'perin; Leont'ev; qualitative research; orientation; execution; control; self-regulation model; internalisation; Toulmin; verbal data; self-questioning; self-instruction; conceptual development; microgenetic development; microgenetic episode; case study design; mediation; scientific concept; private speech; CHAT; SCOBA; verbalisation training; reading-writing connection; STI; task orientation; object-regulation; other-regulation; private speech of adult learners; talking-to-learn; reciprocal skills; reciprocal concepts; reading-writing relationship; speaking and writing; self-regulatory strategy; explicit mediation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wall, B. (n.d.). Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5577

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wall, Bunjong. “Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation .” Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5577.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wall, Bunjong. “Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation .” Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Wall B. Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5577.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Wall B. Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5577

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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