Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:( Rangipo Desert). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Massey University

1. Purves, Andrew Mark. Landscape ecology of the Rangipo desert.

Degree: MS, Soil Science, 1990, Massey University

1.1 Location Of The Study Area In 1847, William Colenso, missionary, explorer, and botanist made his first crossing of the Rangipo Desert in foul weather: "At 3pm we crossed the sand desert called Te Onetapu (Rangipo)- a most desolate weird- looking spot, about 2 miles wide where we crossed it; a fit place for Macbeth's witches or Faust's Brocken scene!" Colenso (1884) was describing a landscape clothed by tussock, dunefields, barren gravelfields and deeply scoured watercourses. The Rangipo Desert is situated on the exposed south-eastern portion of Mount Ruapehu's ring plain. Mount Ruapehu is New Zealand's largest andesitic massif and its summit is the highest peak in the North Island, reaching 2,797m. To the east of the Rangipo Desert uplifted ranges of indurated sandstone, argillite, and conglomerate make up the Kaimanawa Range (Grindley, 1960). The field study was, in the main, confined to the west and south of the Whangaehu River, to the north of the Waihianoa Aqueduct, and to the east of Makahikatoa Stream (Fig. 1.1). The field area, therefore, covers about 40km2 , most of which was gazetted to the New Zealand Army in 1943 (Birch, 1987). The altitude within the study area gradually increases from 910 metres above sea level at Waihianoa Aqueduct, to 1200 metres above sea level at the north-eastern margin of the study area. The landscape of the Rangipo Desert is unique for its contrasts within a few kilometres. In one area eroding light yellow tephra, colonized by only scattered hardy plants, abuts against healthy enclaves of N. solandri; while, in another area only a kilometer away, dunes colonized by Phyllocladus and Halocarpus bidwillii are interpersed across a grey lag pavement covered by scattered boulders and even fewer plants. These contrasting features make the task of delineating the landscape into discrete regions simple.

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand; Rangipo desert; Desert ecology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Purves, A. M. (1990). Landscape ecology of the Rangipo desert. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/10867

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Purves, Andrew Mark. “Landscape ecology of the Rangipo desert.” 1990. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/10867.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Purves, Andrew Mark. “Landscape ecology of the Rangipo desert.” 1990. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Purves AM. Landscape ecology of the Rangipo desert. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 1990. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/10867.

Council of Science Editors:

Purves AM. Landscape ecology of the Rangipo desert. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 1990. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/10867

2. Smith, Angelina Robyn. Vehicle damage to vegetation of the Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, National Park, New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Ecology, Massey University, Turitea, Palmerston North, New Zealand .

Degree: 2014, Massey University

Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, Central North Island, New Zealand, contains one of New Zealand’s unique habitats due to the desert-like environment containing cushions, low lying species, and native grasses which create a diverse mosaic of plant species and colour. This area is under anthropogenic threat from drivers operating vehicles over the vegetation. My aim was is investigate the damage to vegetation and substrates which have been driven over by vehicles. Aerial images were used to draw information about the Desert’s ecosystem, and driver’s manoeuvring preferences which were ground-truthed. A Canonical Correspondence Analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of categories from the aerials after ground-truthing. A Paired t test was used to show varying vegetation densities against other tested variables. A Chi Square Analysis was used to examine where drivers preferred to drive. The results indicate drivers prefer to drive over bare substrate and sparsely vegetated areas within the desert, avoiding dense vegetation, deeply cut channels and rough, un-driveable terrain. The direct damage done by vehicles to vegetation and surrounding substrate was tested by running a simulated tyre over the substrate and plants. A plant having had a tyre pushed over it by hand was compared to a plant that had been previously damaged by vehicles, and a control (undamaged) plant. Analysis of Variance was used to test differences in the growth of the plants within each treatment and the change in topography. There is evidence of plant damage; however, different species reacted differently to treatments, depending on which variable was being tested, making it difficult to identify which species are most affected by vehicle damage. The tyres alter the substrate instantly. Intact and broken substrates were compared by creating wind and rain with a leaf blower and watering can. The change in substrate height was measured and Analysis of Variance was used to test the amount of substrate erosion. Results show broken substrates are eroded at a greater rate than intact substrates, and the erosion rate is increased when the substrate is dry. Wet, sandy substrates in windy conditions and wet, pumice substrates in rain have the lowest amount of substrate movement after damage. The Rangipo Desert’s dry and open ecosystem and vegetation is vulnerable to damage from vehicles. Vehicles cause plant die-back, increase erosion and have the potential to change the current ecosystem. Preventing vehicles driving into the Desert, and educating members of the public about ecosystem damage are good starting points to manage and preserve this area of Tongariro National Park. KEYWORDS Arid ecosystems, vehicle damage, erosion, plant changes, microtopography.

Subjects/Keywords: Off-road vehicles; Environmental aspects; Plant ecology; Arid regions ecology; Ecological disturbances; Rangipo Desert; Tongariro National Park; New Zealand; Arid ecosystems; Vehicle damage; Erosion; Plant changes; Microtopography

…157 8 Figures Figure 1.1 Study site, Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, A. R. (2014). Vehicle damage to vegetation of the Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, National Park, New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Ecology, Massey University, Turitea, Palmerston North, New Zealand . (Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5460

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Angelina Robyn. “Vehicle damage to vegetation of the Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, National Park, New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Ecology, Massey University, Turitea, Palmerston North, New Zealand .” 2014. Thesis, Massey University. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5460.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Angelina Robyn. “Vehicle damage to vegetation of the Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, National Park, New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Ecology, Massey University, Turitea, Palmerston North, New Zealand .” 2014. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith AR. Vehicle damage to vegetation of the Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, National Park, New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Ecology, Massey University, Turitea, Palmerston North, New Zealand . [Internet] [Thesis]. Massey University; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5460.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Smith AR. Vehicle damage to vegetation of the Rangipo Desert, Tongariro National Park, National Park, New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MSc in Ecology, Massey University, Turitea, Palmerston North, New Zealand . [Thesis]. Massey University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/5460

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.