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You searched for subject:( Parihaka Pa). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Massey University

1. Curd, Joshua Richard Burley. Renewable energy technology options for Parihaka Papakāinga.

Degree: Masters of Engineering, Renewable Energy Systems, 2017, Massey University

The Parihaka Papakāinga Trust - the administering body of communally owned Māori land at Parihaka, Aotearoa New Zealand - initiated university research into sustainable energy practices and technologies within a context of community and infrastructure development. As one part of this wider research topic, various renewable energy conversion technologies were compared in terms of cost, effect on increasing the energy independence of the papakāinga (excluding transport, covered elsewhere), and reducing papakāinga greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Consumption of electricity, LPG and firewood was assessed in 14 study buildings over 12 months. Energy demands both now and also for hypothetical scenarios 20 years in the future were proposed, taking into account energy efficiency opportunities, low energy housing design and potential electric vehicle charging loads from parallel research. The local solar, wind and hydro potentials were assessed over 12 months, and estimations of the long-term resources were made using long-term reference data from the region. An estimation was also made of land area requirements to support a short rotation coppicing (SRC) fuelwood plantation. The technical and economic performance of a range of electricity and heat generation technologies was modelled, both on an individual building basis and on a community-wide basis. The technologies with the largest expected economic benefits (after energy efficiency and building design) were a grid-connected community solar PV array with output available for consumption by as much of the papakāinga as possible, and wood-burners for space and water heating in new homes. However further study is required into the design and costs of a feasible metering and billing solution to allocate the benefits of community owned distributed electricity generation. The technologies with the largest expected effect on energy independence include combining solar water heaters with wood-burners and wetbacks for space and water heating, and producing firewood locally with an SRC plantation. Based on the household study, transport behaviours or technologies are expected to have a larger effect on GHG emissions than papakāinga infrastructure. Recommendations include a billing/metering feasibility study potentially followed by a community PV array, an SRC trial, and solar water heaters and wood-burners with water heating for new homes.

Subjects/Keywords: Renewable energy resources; Parihaka Pa; New Zealand; Research Subject Categories::TECHNOLOGY::Electrical engineering, electronics and photonics::Electric power engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Curd, J. R. B. (2017). Renewable energy technology options for Parihaka Papakāinga. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12258

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Curd, Joshua Richard Burley. “Renewable energy technology options for Parihaka Papakāinga.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed July 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12258.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Curd, Joshua Richard Burley. “Renewable energy technology options for Parihaka Papakāinga.” 2017. Web. 05 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Curd JRB. Renewable energy technology options for Parihaka Papakāinga. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12258.

Council of Science Editors:

Curd JRB. Renewable energy technology options for Parihaka Papakāinga. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12258

2. Quinn, Jonathan Paul. Opportunities and barriers to, and benefits and impacts from, papakāinga owned energy systems : a case study of Parihaka.

Degree: Master of Environmental Management, 2017, Massey University

The development of an onsite renewable energy system is seen as key to developing the community of Parihaka and sustaining the expected population increase. This research has assessed the potential options for such a system and the potential opportunities, barriers, impacts and benefits that could come as a result. It was evident from the very first community consultation that one of the most important aspects of this system would be the ownership model, with hui and workshop attendees strongly favouring a community-owned system and this was further emphasised in survey responses. Interestingly, however, the interviews told a different story with a concern over a lack of social cohesion and an imbalance of work ethic leading to a preference for a joint ownership model. For the most part, the data collection phase verified much of the literature review in that Parihaka community views reflected research to date. Examples include high levels of project support when community involvement and consultation throughout the planning phase is present, expected local employment gains and a preference for at least a joint community ownership stake in the project. However, while the survey and interview respondents felt that social barriers would pose the greatest issues the literature review noted that institutional barriers could very well pose much greater difficulties. Visual impact on the landscape from wind turbines is a major source of opposition and residents and people living in the vicinity have the right to disapprove of the aesthetics of a wind turbine. Similar opposition to the use of other RE resources can greatly impede on successful implementation levels. However, the perceived negative impacts of these RE technologies must be assessed with consideration to the fossil fuel equivalents in order to get a clearer picture. Further research opportunities exist for assessing the next stages of the planning phase, with specific regards to papakāinga land, including the preparation of a resource consent application and the legalities and considerations that must be addressed in order to increase the chances of success. Research into the specifics of the desired ownership model is also recommended, in addition to considering the ongoing community commitments needed to maintain the system.

Subjects/Keywords: Renewable energy sources; Natural resources, Communal; Parihaka Pa; New Zealand

…57 7.1. Potential Barriers to Community-Owned Energy Systems in Parihaka… …71 7.2.2. Papakāinga Development Considerations specific to Parihaka… …76 7.3.3. Policy Plans specific to Parihaka… …77 7.4. Potential opportunities community-owned renewable energy can bring to Parihaka 78… …80 7.5. Potential Benefits of Community-owned Renewable Energy in Parihaka… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Quinn, J. P. (2017). Opportunities and barriers to, and benefits and impacts from, papakāinga owned energy systems : a case study of Parihaka. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12794

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Quinn, Jonathan Paul. “Opportunities and barriers to, and benefits and impacts from, papakāinga owned energy systems : a case study of Parihaka.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed July 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12794.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Quinn, Jonathan Paul. “Opportunities and barriers to, and benefits and impacts from, papakāinga owned energy systems : a case study of Parihaka.” 2017. Web. 05 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Quinn JP. Opportunities and barriers to, and benefits and impacts from, papakāinga owned energy systems : a case study of Parihaka. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12794.

Council of Science Editors:

Quinn JP. Opportunities and barriers to, and benefits and impacts from, papakāinga owned energy systems : a case study of Parihaka. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12794


Massey University

3. Pearless, Harawira Craig. State as terrorist : kāwan[a]tanga te kaiwhakatuma : Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916, Ruatoki 2007 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies at Massey University .

Degree: 2009, Massey University

This thesis explores New Zealand Policing practice during the invasions, expeditions and raids at Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916 and Ruatoki 2007. An analysis is provided of the consequences and dynamics of governance by force and State's action against Maori in these three cases. Policing practices at Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916 and Ruatoki 2007 are described and a critique of the trends and politics are provided to support the thesis that state terror was orchestrated by the respective governments of the day and delivered coercively against Maori by the New Zealand Police to procure land, suppress Maori leadership and disavow Maori assertions of sovereignty. In this context it is argued that these actions can be considered what Stohl1 refers to as acts of state terror which over time have oppressed, repressed, and terrorized Maori. It is argued that the state and the state's enforcers have used acts of state terror against Maori to quash legitimate assertions of Maori self determination after labeling Maori actions as nationalist dissidence.

Subjects/Keywords: State-sponsored terrorism; New Zealand; History; Insurgency; Maori; Government relations; Parihaka Pa; Maungapohatu; Ruatoki; Kōrero nehe; Tōrangapū; Politics and government

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pearless, H. C. (2009). State as terrorist : kāwan[a]tanga te kaiwhakatuma : Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916, Ruatoki 2007 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies at Massey University . (Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/3276

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pearless, Harawira Craig. “State as terrorist : kāwan[a]tanga te kaiwhakatuma : Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916, Ruatoki 2007 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies at Massey University .” 2009. Thesis, Massey University. Accessed July 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/3276.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pearless, Harawira Craig. “State as terrorist : kāwan[a]tanga te kaiwhakatuma : Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916, Ruatoki 2007 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies at Massey University .” 2009. Web. 05 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Pearless HC. State as terrorist : kāwan[a]tanga te kaiwhakatuma : Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916, Ruatoki 2007 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies at Massey University . [Internet] [Thesis]. Massey University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/3276.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pearless HC. State as terrorist : kāwan[a]tanga te kaiwhakatuma : Parihaka 1881, Maungapohatu 1916, Ruatoki 2007 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies at Massey University . [Thesis]. Massey University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/3276

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.