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You searched for subject:( Overseas adoption). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Massey University

1. Wilson, Catherine Marie. The process of an intercountry adoption : the role of the women within the couples involved.

Degree: MSW, 2001, Massey University

This thesis studies the experiences of ten married couples in New Zealand, in particular the women, who have completed the process of adopting a child or children from overseas. It has two main objectives: first to highlight the role of the woman within a married couple applying to adopt intercountry; and second, to note any gender differences in the experience and perception of this process and the issues involved. The research design for this study followed the approach of eidetic phenomenology which focuses on the perceptions and meanings that people use to interpret their own experiences. Data were collected using in-depth, audiotaped personal interviews with the participants, and detailed case notes made during the interview. Personal observations after each interview were also used. The data were analysed using content analysis with cross-case groupings of responses into themes. The findings indicate that women are the main instigators and organisers in the process of achieving an intercountry adoption. Within this role the women often felt unsupported by both professionals and organisations involved. The findings also indicate areas for further research and review for professional practice and policy, in order to provide more effective and supportive assistance throughout the process of adopting a child or children from overseas.

Subjects/Keywords: Adoption, New Zealand; Interracial adoption; Intercountry adoption; Overseas adoption

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, C. M. (2001). The process of an intercountry adoption : the role of the women within the couples involved. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/6670

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Catherine Marie. “The process of an intercountry adoption : the role of the women within the couples involved.” 2001. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/6670.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Catherine Marie. “The process of an intercountry adoption : the role of the women within the couples involved.” 2001. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilson CM. The process of an intercountry adoption : the role of the women within the couples involved. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 2001. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/6670.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson CM. The process of an intercountry adoption : the role of the women within the couples involved. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 2001. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/6670


UCLA

2. Cavicchi, Andrea. Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea.

Degree: Asian Languages & Cultures 00A9, 2016, UCLA

This dissertation explores the lives and experiences of individuals who were born in Korea, adopted overseas as infants or young children, and have returned to their country of birth as adults. More specifically, I present the diverse, creative, and sometimes subtle ways in which adoptee returnees have engaged in resistance in order to reclaim their right to reside in Korea, access their personal histories, and challenge the system that produced their subjectivities as overseas Korean adoptees. Ranging from everyday practices, such as cross-cultural or linguistic code-switching, to grassroots activism and coalition building, this broad spectrum of resistance practices elucidates the ways power manifests itself in several forms in Korean society, the state, and the adoption industry. Throughout this study, I draw on the theoretical contributions of Michel Foucault, which have greatly shaped our understandings of power in its ubiquity and multi-dimensionality, and Michel de Certeau’s concepts of strategies, tactics, and resistance against power in daily life practices. I approach the interactions of power and resistance as inherently dynamic, open-ended, unpredictable, and constantly shifting rather than assume direct causation or the necessary presence of intention or consciousness. I argue that all these practices, including the act of return to a place from where these adoptee returnees were adopted away in previous decades, signify resistance against existing systems of power. In an attempt to disrupt conventional narratives of adoption, this study aims to focus the discussion on those who have been directly affected by Korea’s inadequate social welfare system and the institution of overseas adoption: adoptees, families of origin, single mother families, and other vulnerable members of Korean society. Broken down into an introduction, three main chapters, and a conclusion, this study is an ethnography that conceptualizes power and resistance through narratives. I present a historical overview of adoption practices in Korea starting from the mid- and late Chosǒn dynasty and continuing up to current overseas and domestic adoption practices. Additionally, I situate the return of Korean adoptees to Korea and their everyday practices and modes of consumption within the history of overseas Korean adoption. Next, I focus on original family search and reunion among adoptees, which includes a debate surrounding access to adoption records and personal histories. The discussion then shifts to a coalition that has formed among adult adoptee returnees, unwed and single mothers, original Korean family members who have been separated from a child or children through Korean adoption practices, a Korean pastor and his wife who run an adoptee guesthouse in Seoul, and other allies, highlighting their mobilization strategies and political activism. Finally, I consider how utilizing a social justice and human rights framework facilitates a more holistic understanding of the history of Korean adoption and the lives that have been…

Subjects/Keywords: Asian history; Asian American studies; Asian studies; Activism; Adoptees; Korea; Overseas Korean Adoption; Resistance; Unwed Mothers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cavicchi, A. (2016). Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9299j68r

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cavicchi, Andrea. “Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea.” 2016. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9299j68r.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cavicchi, Andrea. “Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Cavicchi A. Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9299j68r.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cavicchi A. Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2016. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9299j68r

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.