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You searched for subject:( Metrical Psalms). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Cop, Michael Andrew. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .

Degree: 2011, University of Otago

Early modern English biblical verse at times seems clumsy or repetitious. This thesis argues that some of this poetic and narrative dissonance originates in the biblical events that poets and versifiers turned into verse. The Bible often reports events differently across its books. Such differing narrative strands are often dissonant: they do not report one unified, harmonious story. Early modern readers habitually thought across differing biblical narrative strands because biblical commentary, gospel harmonies, and the margins of the Bible itself encouraged their readers to do so; those same readers also believed that the differing narrative strands tell a harmonious story because they believed that the words of the Bible are consistent. Modern readers often do not share that same habit or belief. If we are to have informed readings of early modern biblical verse, we need to recapture the habit of thinking across the Bible and the belief that beneath the apparent biblical dissonance was an underlying consonance. My research indicates that when the Bible has conflicting details for an event, poets and versifiers sometimes include that conflict in their verse and thereby inherit biblical dissonance. The introduction exhibits the habit of thinking across the Bible in prose through the examples of biblical marginalia and commentaries as well as through the fullest textual representation of this habit, gospel harmonies. The subsequent chapters examine biblical verse, each exploring a story for which the relationship between biblical narrative strands becomes increasingly complex. Chapter 1 establishes what it means to versify the Bible by taking some metrical psalms and then versions of the Samson story as examples of poets and versifiers working on parts of the Bible for which there is only a single narrative strand but which still contain inconsistencies. Chapter 2 addresses versions of the Creation, a story for which there are two differing biblical narrative strands. The chapter classifies four methods of engaging biblical difference in verse through the examples of William Hunnis’s A Hyve Fvll of Hunnye, Joshua Sylvester’s translation of Guillaume de Saluste Du Bartas’s The Divine Weeks, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, and John Dryden’s The State of Innocence. Chapter 3 looks at the temptations of Jesus, a story for which there are three differing biblical narrative strands; it demonstrates specific rhetorical strategies for including biblical differences in verse through the examples of John Bale’s, Giles Fletcher’s, Henry Vaughan’s, John Milton’s, and Samuel Wesley’s versions of the temptation story. Chapter 4 explores the story of the anointing of Jesus, a story for which the relationship amongst the four differing narrative strands is ambiguous, and demonstrates that the more complex the relationship is amongst differing strands, the less likely versions are to incorporate the all of the differences from amongst those strands. The thesis concludes with a new reading of George Herbert’s “The Sacrifice,” a poem… Advisors/Committee Members: Tribble, Lyn (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Early Modern English Verse; The Bible; John Milton; John Dryden; Du Bartas; George Herbert; Henry Vaughan; Gospel Harmonies; Metrical Psalms; Harmonization; Samson; Francis Quarles; Creation; The Temptations; Mary Magdalene; Johan Hiud; Henry Garthwait; John Bale; Zachary Boyd; Giles Fletcher; Samuel Wesley; Paradise Lost; Paradise Regained; Samson Agonistes; The Anointing; William Hunnis; The Sacrifice; John Bunyan; The Divine Weeks; Synoptic Gospels; Gerard De Gols; Lewis Wager; Elisha Coles; Gervase Markham; George Sandys; George Wither; Thomas Sternhold; English Renaissance

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APA (6th Edition):

Cop, M. A. (2011). Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cop, Michael Andrew. “Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cop, Michael Andrew. “Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .” 2011. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Cop MA. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843.

Council of Science Editors:

Cop MA. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843

2. Duguid, Timothy Charles. Sing a new song : English and Scottish metrical psalmody from 1549-1640.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Edinburgh

The Book of Psalms has occupied a privileged place in Christianity from its earliest years, but it was not until the sixteenth century that metrical versifications of the Psalms became popular. Because of the notable influence of Martin Luther and John Calvin, the musical phenomenon of metrical psalm singing spread throughout Protestant circles on the European mainland and in Britain. These versifications knew no boundaries among Protestants: reformers and parishioners, kings and laypeople, men and women, young and old memorised and sang the metrical psalms. In England and Scotland, the versifications written by Thomas Sternhold and John Hopkins became the most popular, as editions of these texts were printed in England from 1549 to 1828. The present study considers these metrical versifications and their melodies as they were printed and performed in England and Scotland from their inception until the final Scottish edition appeared in 1640. In particular, this study asserts that the years from 1560 to 1640 saw the development and reinforcement of two distinct ecclesiastical psalm cultures, one in England and the other in Scotland. Though based on a common foundation in the Sternhold and Hopkins texts, English and Scottish metrical psalmody preserved their distinct natures. However, both traditions also influenced their counterparts. The present study considers these cross‐influences and their effect on the tensions between conformity with foreign influences and fidelity to established practice in both countries. This study finally seeks to fill two significant gaps in current scholarship. It first compares the developments in English and Scottish metrical psalmody in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Secondly, it considers the relationships between psalm tunes and their texts, with a closer musical analysis of the tunes than has previously been attempted.

Subjects/Keywords: 780; metrical psalms; Reformation; Sternhold and Hopkins; psalm singing

…Goostly psalmes and spirituall songes’ English and Dutch Metrical Psalms from Coverdale to… …Britain. While his church did not sing metrical psalms exclusively, the use of songs that… …metrical paraphrases of the Psalms first appeared in the Anglo‐Saxon versions of psalms from the… …policies, metrical psalms once again began… …metrical psalms or other texts that displayed the clear influence of Lutheranism.13… 

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Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Duguid, T. C. (2011). Sing a new song : English and Scottish metrical psalmody from 1549-1640. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5966

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duguid, Timothy Charles. “Sing a new song : English and Scottish metrical psalmody from 1549-1640.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5966.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duguid, Timothy Charles. “Sing a new song : English and Scottish metrical psalmody from 1549-1640.” 2011. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Duguid TC. Sing a new song : English and Scottish metrical psalmody from 1549-1640. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5966.

Council of Science Editors:

Duguid TC. Sing a new song : English and Scottish metrical psalmody from 1549-1640. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/5966

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