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You searched for subject:( Maori Prehistory). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Booth, John March. A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century .

Degree: 2009, University of Otago

Summary: "The ignorance which, generally speaking, prevails regarding the true character of the aboriginal population is not wonderful, simply because we know that there is no other branch of knowledge of which men are so thoroughly ignorant as the study of man himself. the constitution of man, mental as well as bodily, forms as yet no part of the ordinary course of education; and men are sent forth into the world to meet, deal, and to treat with one another, in total ignorance of each other's character. it is not, under such circumstances, to be wonderer at, that, even in civilized life, disputes, quarrels, and troubles should exist; how much less so when the two extremes, the savage and the civilized, are brought into contact with one another."(1) With these words Dr. Martin, in 1845, outlined the need for special training for those who had to deal with native races, whether as missionaries, administrators, or merely as settlers amongst them. All those who came into contact with the Māoris had, of necessity, to study their ways to a certain extent, and some naturally, were more proficient in this than were their fellows. Wherever there was one who, through his understanding of the native character and the strength of his influence, was able to guide both Māori and Pakeha in their relations with one another, there the two peoples lived in peace. Dissension arose through the ignorance of either party of laws of the other, or because those laws were deliberately flouted. Training in the study of man, as suggested by Martin, would have dispelled this ignorance and inculcated a spirit of tolerance which could have eased much of the friction that ensued. Where it was essential to compromise on conflicting points, or where the weaker of the two parties was forced to conform to the ways of the other, then again this training would have indicated the best procedure to be adopted. But no system of schooling at that time included a study of anything like anthropology, which was then an unthought-of science, and the only hope of harmonious race relations lay in the possibility that certain of those in responsible positions amongst both Europeans and Māoris would have enough wit to discern the right course – Introduction.

Subjects/Keywords: Anthropology; Maori; Pakeha; ethnology; material culture; social organization; origins; prehistory; missionaries; settlers

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APA (6th Edition):

Booth, J. M. (2009). A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/549

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Booth, John March. “A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century .” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/549.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Booth, John March. “A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century .” 2009. Web. 28 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Booth JM. A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/549.

Council of Science Editors:

Booth JM. A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/549


University of Otago

2. Findlater, Amy Margaret. Recontextualising Material Culture: an investigation of the minnow lure shanks from Kawatiri River Mouth and Wairau Bar, Southern New Zealand .

Degree: 2011, University of Otago

This research examines the problem of the concept of context for New Zealand archaeology and material culture studies. It is argued that it is not a lack of context associated with material culture but the perception of context that is problematic for archaeological interpretation. Although central to material culture studies, traditional archaeological perceptions of context have treated the concept as something to be mitigated against in archaeological practice. This has resulted in the underdevelopment of material culture studies and a focus on morphological, chronological and functional or utilitarian interpretations through the categorisation of material culture. A case study investigating the lives of minnow lure shanks is developed in line with international perceptions of the concept to show instead how material culture shifts through contexts. A laboratory study of minnow lure shanks from Wairau Bar and Kawatiri River Mouth is juxtaposed with ethnographic accounts, museum collections, exhibitions, artist inventions and mātauranga Māori which provide alternative sources of data and analogy. A life history approach is used to focus on the interconnectedness between social and technological processes in the past and present to show how lures have come to be through multiple biographies and transformations. The outcome was a recontextualisation of lures with implications for the future of all New Zealand material culture studies. I argue that the shift from pearl shell to stone in New Zealand prehistory and its later abandonment was a lot more complex than a simple raw material switch involving the use of existing and transported social and technological strategies. The methodology adopted uncovered the variation in lures, reflecting broad strategies, and compared processes, choices and intentions. Minnow lures are bodies, connected to bodies and found with bodies with natural and aesthetic properties connected to the ritual and mundane - tapu and noa. Lures are part of a living tradition as one point of interaction and attraction between people, ancestors, the land, sea and taonga. This study urges archaeologists to consider their roles as kaitiaki taonga and kaitiaki maumahara to ensure material culture remains an enduring centre of enquiry. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas, Timothy (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: context; fishing gear; material culture; Wairau Bar; Kawatiri River Mouth; Maori; prehistory; archaeology; minnow lure shanks

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Findlater, A. M. (2011). Recontextualising Material Culture: an investigation of the minnow lure shanks from Kawatiri River Mouth and Wairau Bar, Southern New Zealand . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1975

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Findlater, Amy Margaret. “Recontextualising Material Culture: an investigation of the minnow lure shanks from Kawatiri River Mouth and Wairau Bar, Southern New Zealand .” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1975.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Findlater, Amy Margaret. “Recontextualising Material Culture: an investigation of the minnow lure shanks from Kawatiri River Mouth and Wairau Bar, Southern New Zealand .” 2011. Web. 28 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Findlater AM. Recontextualising Material Culture: an investigation of the minnow lure shanks from Kawatiri River Mouth and Wairau Bar, Southern New Zealand . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1975.

Council of Science Editors:

Findlater AM. Recontextualising Material Culture: an investigation of the minnow lure shanks from Kawatiri River Mouth and Wairau Bar, Southern New Zealand . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1975


University of Otago

3. Kerby, Georgia. Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture .

Degree: University of Otago

Over 140 years of excavation events at the Redcliffs site complex on the edge of Ihutai, Canterbury, has resulted in a unique material culture collection in Canterbury Museum. The site complex’s physical setting is located with easy access to a large range of resources, inland access routes, and shelter on Canterbury’s east coast. However, it lay directly on the shores of a highly dynamic microtidal estuary, which was an open bay upon first Māori arrival to the area and has likely influenced past patterns of settlement and the preservation of the local archaeological record. This thesis has achieved two outcomes. The first was the organisation and synthesis of the archaeological history of the Redcliffs site complex, from 1865-2003, in order to recognise the state and availability of Redcliffs archaeological information for future studies. The second was the production of an artefact inventory and description of the Redcliffs site complex material culture collection based on records in Canterbury Museum. This work supports that Redcliffs was the host of several temporary camps during winter spanning the mid to late 14th century AD to the early 16th century AD. Rather than Redcliffs being simply a ‘Moa Hunter’ camp, as it is often described, it was the locus of broad scale and opportunistic hunter gatherer practices, with a focus on fishing, shellfish collection, and fowling. Moncks Cave’s material culture showed some distinctions to that of the rest of the site complex which, with what is previously known about its faunal record, reveals that large scale cultural changes were taking place between AD1400 to AD1500 in relation to the decline of moa and seal and likely local geomorphological fluctuations. While many more aspects of Redcliffs life need further investigation, particularly the site complex’s chronology, the Redcliffs site complex’s material culture and especially its organic artefacts have revealed a more detailed and realistic image of Māori everyday life during the earliest periods of settlement than previously seen in Aotearoa. Advisors/Committee Members: Walter, Richard (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand; Archaeology; Material Culture; Moa Bone Point Cave; Moncks Cave; Redcliffs Flat; Redcliffs; Sumner Burial Ground; Sumner Cutting; Maori Prehistory; Organic Artefacts; Sumner; Archaic; Maori; Aotearoa; Canterbury Museum; Historic Records; Roger Duff; Michael Trotter; Chris Jacomb; Junior Archaeological Club; Selwyn Hovell; Wooden Artefacts; Culture Change; Geomorphological; Southshore Spit; Moa Bone; Midden; Site Complex; Fourteenth Century; Fifteenth Century; Sixteenth Century; Tranisitonal; Bird Spear Point; Waka; Outrigger Float; Moa Hunter; Julius von Haast; McKay; Inventory; Winter Camp; Avon-Heathcote Estuary; Ihutai

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kerby, G. (n.d.). Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kerby, Georgia. “Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kerby, Georgia. “Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture .” Web. 28 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Kerby G. Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2020 Jan 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Kerby G. Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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