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You searched for subject:( Landelike gebiede). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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North-West University

1. Maré, Lanél. A psycho–social profile and HIV status in an African group / Lanél Maré .

Degree: 2010, North-West University

An estimated 30 to 36 million people worldwide are living with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). In 2009 about 5.7 million of the 30 to 36 million people who are infected with HIV were living in South Africa, making South Africa the country with the largest number of people infected with HIV in the world (UNGASS, 2010). Van Dyk (2008) states that HIV infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) are accompanied by symptoms of psycho–social distress, but relatively little is known of the direct effect of HIV and AIDS on psychological well–being. The psychological distress is mainly due to the difficulties HIV brings to daily life and the harsh reality of the prognosis of the illness (Van Dyk, 2008). It is not clear whether people infected with HIV who are unaware of their HIV status show more psychological symptoms than people in a group not infected with HIV. The research question for the current study was therefore whether people with and without HIV infection differ in their psycho–social symptoms and strengths before they know their HIV status. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial health profiles of people with and without HIV and AIDS before they knew their infection status. A cross–sectional survey design was used for gathering psychological data. This was part of a multi–disciplinary study where the participants’ HIV status was determined after obtaining their informed consent and giving pre– and post–test counselling. This study falls in the overlap of the South African leg of the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology study (PURE–SA) that investigates the health transition and chronic diseases of lifestyle in urban and rural areas (Teo, Chow, Vaz, Rangarajan, & Ysusf, 2009), and the FORT2 and 3 projects (FORT2 = Understanding and promoting psychosocial health, resilience and strengths in an African context; Fort 3 = The prevalence of levels of psychosocial health: Dynamics and relationships with biomarkers of (ill) health in the South African contexts) (Wissing, 2005, 2008) on psychological well–being and its biological correlates. All the baseline data were collected during 2005. Of the 1 025 participants who completed all of the psychological health questionnaires, 153 (14.9%) were infected with HIV and 863 were not infected with HIV (since the HIV status of nine of the participants was not known, they were not included in the study). In the urban communities 435 participants completed the psychological health questionnaires, of whom 68 (15.6%) were infected with HIV and 367 were not infected with HIV. In the rural communities, 581 participants completed the psychological health questionnaires, of whom 85 (14.6%) were infected with HIV and 496 were not infected with HIV. The validated Setswana versions of the following seven psychological health questionnaires were used: Affectometer 2 (AFM), Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), Community Collective Efficacy Scale (CCES), Mental Health Continuum Short Form (MHC–SF), New General Self–efficacy Scale (NGSE),…

Subjects/Keywords: HIV and AIDS; Psycho-social well-being; Biological influences; African; Rural areas; Urban areas; MIV en VIGS; Psigososiale welstand; Biologiese invloede; Afrika; Landelike gebiede; Stedelike gebiede

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Maré, L. (2010). A psycho–social profile and HIV status in an African group / Lanél Maré . (Thesis). North-West University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4696

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maré, Lanél. “A psycho–social profile and HIV status in an African group / Lanél Maré .” 2010. Thesis, North-West University. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4696.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maré, Lanél. “A psycho–social profile and HIV status in an African group / Lanél Maré .” 2010. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Maré L. A psycho–social profile and HIV status in an African group / Lanél Maré . [Internet] [Thesis]. North-West University; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4696.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Maré L. A psycho–social profile and HIV status in an African group / Lanél Maré . [Thesis]. North-West University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4696

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North-West University

2. Magwaza, Duduzile Witness. The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W.

Degree: 2011, North-West University

This mini–dissertation addresses the management of the potable water supply in the Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority's area of jurisdiction. The main objectives of the study were to determine the organisational structures and public policies governing the potable water supply in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality with a view to establishing the factors that hinder the provision of potable water to some parts of the Mkhwanazi Tribal Area and also determine how the present potable water situation is perceived by the MTA residents. The Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority's area of jurisdiction is predominantly a residential area for the Zulu speaking people under the uMhlathuze Local Municipality's area of responsibility in the Province of KwaZulu–Natal. The organisational structures governing the potable water supply in the MTA identified in the study are the ULM comprising of the Municipal Council and the administrative; Integrated Development Plan; Water Services Provider; Water Committee; and the Mkhwanazi Tribal Council. The provision of potable water in the MTA is regulated through the UMhlathuze Water Services By–Laws which are based on the standards of basic water and sanitation in terms of the White Paper on Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) (SA, 1994:17). The study established that the challenges affecting the potable water supply are the lack of funds in the Municipality, rising water demand, human capacity and water loss. The MTA residents appreciate the current potable water supply by the ULM but have a negative attitude towards paying for water services because they consider water as a natural resource that must be freely supplied to them by the Government. Therefore, the study recommended that water awareness campaigns be conducted regularly amongst the MTA community to raise the importance of having potable water in the community.

Subjects/Keywords: Management; Potable water; Public policies; Tribal authority; Local municipality; Sustainable development; Rural areas; Water resource; Bestuur; Drinkbare water; Openbare beleid; Stamowerheid; Plaaslike munisipaliteit; Volhoubare-ontwikkeling; Landelike gebiede; Water hulpbron

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Magwaza, D. W. (2011). The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W. (Thesis). North-West University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7063

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Magwaza, Duduzile Witness. “The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W. ” 2011. Thesis, North-West University. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7063.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Magwaza, Duduzile Witness. “The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W. ” 2011. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Magwaza DW. The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W. [Internet] [Thesis]. North-West University; 2011. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7063.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Magwaza DW. The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W. [Thesis]. North-West University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7063

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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