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University of Waikato

1. Pham, Thi Nguyen Ai. Emotion in English as an additional language oral communication: Vietnamese English language teachers and students .

Degree: 2017, University of Waikato

In applied linguistics, the scope of emotion research has broadened from the simple linear cause and effect paradigm of anxiety to multiple facets of emotions and their interaction with various aspects of language learning. Along with this development, the social dimension of emotions is currently receiving an increasing amount of research attention. The present study has continued that focus by exploring the trajectories of changing emotions throughout the lifelong experience of English language learning and language use among Vietnamese EAL tertiary teachers and EAL teacher candidates in a single Vietnamese university. The study also highlights the role of emotion in their English oral communication. This study employed a qualitatively-driven mixed methods research design. Two phases of data collection using initial and exploratory self-designed questionnaires, followed by semi-structured interviews and reflective journals took place over approximately six months. The quantitative data, collected from all EAL teachers and their final-year students in the English faculty, aimed to capture the range of emotions the participants experienced in speaking English. The qualitative data, collected from nine teachers and ten students recruited from the questionnaire phase, revealed the complexity and dynamism of their emotions in the process of language learning and use. It also sought to understand the rich sources of their emotions, and the influences of emotions on their oral communication. LimeSurvey was employed to collect and analyze the questionnaire data, and thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. The findings show that the participants experienced shifting emotions across the different contexts of language learning, including family, school, out-of-school, tertiary and professional contexts. The emotions were seen to be dynamic, socially and contextually constructed, emerging from their social circumstances and interaction with others. They were interwoven with self-concept, language learning success, perceived standing in different communities, and relationships with others. Emotions also appeared to play a significant role in motivating the participants to take up English for their teaching profession. Theories of belonging, agency and positioning, as well as L1 cultural values informed the interpretation of the data to help explain the complexity of emotion for these participants. The results also provide theoretical and practical implications for emotion research and pedagogies of EAL teaching and learning. The participants’ emotional self-regulation was not dealt with in this study because there was little evidence in the data. Advisors/Committee Members: Hunter, Judy (advisor), Hill, Richard Kenneth (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Emotions; EAL oral communication; Contexts & relationships; Sense of belonging; Positioning; L1 Culture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pham, T. N. A. (2017). Emotion in English as an additional language oral communication: Vietnamese English language teachers and students . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11440

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pham, Thi Nguyen Ai. “Emotion in English as an additional language oral communication: Vietnamese English language teachers and students .” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11440.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pham, Thi Nguyen Ai. “Emotion in English as an additional language oral communication: Vietnamese English language teachers and students .” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pham TNA. Emotion in English as an additional language oral communication: Vietnamese English language teachers and students . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11440.

Council of Science Editors:

Pham TNA. Emotion in English as an additional language oral communication: Vietnamese English language teachers and students . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11440


Case Western Reserve University

2. Dorand, Rodney Dixon, Jr. DEFINING THE ROLE OF IMMUNE THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CNS MALIGNANCY.

Degree: PhD, Pathology, 2016, Case Western Reserve University

Understanding the mechanisms tumors employ to escape detection by both the innate and adaptive immune systems is imperative for developing new immune based therapeutics. Available evidence now favors the view that physiological immune surveillance by members of the innate and adaptive immune systems play an essential role in suppressing tumor development in vivo, and the failure of immune surveillance mechanisms favors tumor development and metastasis formation (1, 2). Whether it is altering cell surface markers, secreting cytokines, or even altering its genome, tumors can evolve much faster than the immune system. New and innovative approaches to cancer therapy are necessary to combat all cancer types, but especially solid tumors as current immunotherapies are more effective at targeting non-solid tumors. Even further complicating physiologic immune surveillance, tumors that develop within the central nervous system (CNS) do so behind the blood brain barrier (BBB) that can serve as an impediment to both the small molecules employed in immunotherapeutics, as well as, the infiltrating lymphocytes necessary for tumor elimination. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant CNS neoplasm in the pediatric setting, accounting for 20% of pediatric CNS malignancies overall. It is a WHO-Grade IV primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) that develops in the cerebellum and often invades into surrounding structures including the fourth ventricle and brain stem (3). While treatment modalities and, more importantly, post treatment cognitive instruction has improved outcomes, surviving patients still suffer cognitive sequelae (4). Unique to CNS neoplasms are microglia, an additional immune cell type that plays a pivotal role in normal immune surveillance of the CNS, phagocytosis, and neuroinflammation (5). Microglia reside in the brain parenchyma and help maintain the homeostatic immunosuppressive environment partially due to their expression of CX3CR1. Fractalkine (FKN) is constitutively expressed by neurons and astrocytes leading to tonic inhibition of microglial activation (6). In the presence of malignancy, FKN signaling is disrupted and we found MB can even express FKN itself. Understanding the intricacies of the FKN signaling axis may provide the key signals leading to immune suppression in the CNS in the context of malignant tumors.Furthermore, strategies that augment physiologic immune surveillance, such as the development of tumor vaccines and the addition of small molecule inhibitors, have the potential to benefit therapeutic approaches for CNS malignancies. Whether using a conventional ex vivo vaccine approach (7), or new in situ approaches centered around plant viral nanoparticles (8), vaccination strategies hold great possibilities for enhancing CNS tumor surveillance by vigorously activating the adaptive immune system. To ensure continued activation of the immune response, other therapeutic approaches focus on targeting known immune checkpoint molecules such as CTLA-4, PD-1, or PD-L1, which are expressed on the… Advisors/Committee Members: Huang, Alex (Advisor), Dubyak, George (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Immunology; Nanotechnology; Neurobiology; Medulloblatsoma, Cancer Immunotherapy, Viral Nanoparticles, Immune Checkpoint, PD-L1, Cyclin Dependent Kinase-5, Organotypic Brain Slice Culture, Microglia, CX3CR1, IRF2BP2

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dorand, Rodney Dixon, J. (2016). DEFINING THE ROLE OF IMMUNE THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CNS MALIGNANCY. (Doctoral Dissertation). Case Western Reserve University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1465566883

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dorand, Rodney Dixon, Jr. “DEFINING THE ROLE OF IMMUNE THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CNS MALIGNANCY.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Case Western Reserve University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1465566883.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dorand, Rodney Dixon, Jr. “DEFINING THE ROLE OF IMMUNE THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CNS MALIGNANCY.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Dorand, Rodney Dixon J. DEFINING THE ROLE OF IMMUNE THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CNS MALIGNANCY. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1465566883.

Council of Science Editors:

Dorand, Rodney Dixon J. DEFINING THE ROLE OF IMMUNE THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CNS MALIGNANCY. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1465566883


Central Queensland University

3. Huang, Meng-Yi. Incorporating an on-line exchange student language program within second language curricula : a case study of Taiwanese primary school students working with Australian students.

Degree: 2011, Central Queensland University

"The planning and promotion of a foreign or second language education in the primary school seems a worldwide trend. English and Chinese, as global communication media, are particularly emphasised recently. In Taiwan, learning English is regarded as a Foreign Language study (EFL) as it is far different from learning English as a Second Language (ESL) or as a first language (LI) ... This research explores the potential for ICT technology to be integrated into the practice of second language teaching pedagogy, to enhance current teaching theory in support of second language teaching and acquisition. The trans-national and cross linguistic language learners in Taiwan and Australia used of Yahoo messenger program [sic], as well as the transference of the resource of instruction between young learners and machine. This research project provided a twelve-week ICT intervention for Taiwanese English-based learners and Australian Mandarin-based learners to practice their target lanaguages, and students were given the same topic weekly to prepart their conversation weekly. The project recruited similar age Australian and Taiwanese students (at the range of ten to eleven), and they have learnt their target language for three years in their own countries" – Abstract.

Subjects/Keywords: Second language acquisition.; English language Study and teaching (Primary); Mandarin dialects Study and teaching (Primary); Language and languages Computer-assisted instruction.; Inter-school cooperation.; TBA.; TBA.; TBA.; ESL  – L1  – L2  – ICT intervention  – Cross-culture; Thesis; Book. e-thesis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Huang, M. (2011). Incorporating an on-line exchange student language program within second language curricula : a case study of Taiwanese primary school students working with Australian students. (Thesis). Central Queensland University. Retrieved from http://hdl.cqu.edu.au/10018/918270

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huang, Meng-Yi. “Incorporating an on-line exchange student language program within second language curricula : a case study of Taiwanese primary school students working with Australian students.” 2011. Thesis, Central Queensland University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.cqu.edu.au/10018/918270.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huang, Meng-Yi. “Incorporating an on-line exchange student language program within second language curricula : a case study of Taiwanese primary school students working with Australian students.” 2011. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Huang M. Incorporating an on-line exchange student language program within second language curricula : a case study of Taiwanese primary school students working with Australian students. [Internet] [Thesis]. Central Queensland University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.cqu.edu.au/10018/918270.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Huang M. Incorporating an on-line exchange student language program within second language curricula : a case study of Taiwanese primary school students working with Australian students. [Thesis]. Central Queensland University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.cqu.edu.au/10018/918270

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.