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1. Esmaeili Taheri, Ahmad. FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH DURUM WHEAT ROOTS IN DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS.

Degree: 2013, University of Saskatchewan

Differences in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) microbial compatibility and/ or their associated farming practices may influence root fungi of the following crop and affect the yield. The main objective of this research was to explain the difference in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) yield the year after pea and chickpea crops through changes in the functional diversity of wheat root fungi. The effect of fungicides used on chickpea on the root fungi of a following durum wheat crop was studied using plate culture and pyrosequencing. Pyrosequencing detected more Fusarium spp. in the roots of durum wheat after fungicide-treated chickpea than in non-fungicide treated chickpea. Plate culture revealed that the functional groups of fungi responded differently to fungicide use in the field but the effect on total community was non-significant. Highly virulent pathogens were not affected, but antagonists were suppressed. More fungal antagonists were detected after the chickpea CDC Luna than CDC Vanguard. Fungal species responded differently to the use of fungicides in vitro, but the aggregate inhibition effect on antagonists and highly virulent pathogens was similar. The effect of chickpea vs. pea previous crop and different chickpea termination times on root fungi of a following durum wheat crop was studied. The abundance of Fusarium spp. increased after cultivation of both cultivars of chickpea as compared to pea according to pyrosequencing and was negatively correlated with durum yield. Plate culture analysis revealed that fungal antagonists were more prevalent after pea than both cultivars of chickpea and chickpea CDC Vanguard increased the abundance of highly virulent pathogens. The abundance of highly virulent pathogens in durum wheat roots was negatively correlated to durum yield. Early termination of chickpea did not change the community of culturable fungi in the roots of a following durum crop. It is noteworthy that Fusarium redolens was identified for the first time in Saskatchewan and its pathogenicity was confirmed on durum wheat, pea and chickpea. The classical method of root disease diagnostics in cereals is based on the examination of the subcrown internode. I evaluated the method by comparing the fungal communities associated with different subterranean organs of durum wheat. The fungal community of the subcrown internode was different from that of roots and crown, suggesting cautious use of this method. Advisors/Committee Members: Hamel, Chantal, Korber, Darren, Qiu, Xiao, Knight, Diane, Gan, Yantai, Farrell, Richard, Khachatourians, George.

Subjects/Keywords: Fungal Functional Diversity; Fungal Ecology; Fungal Metagenomic; Fungal Endophytes; Fungal Pathogens; Soil-Borne Diseases; Pulse Rotation; Foliar Fungicide Application; Pea (Pisum sativum L.); Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.); Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L.); Pyrosequencing; Plate Culture; Biocontrol; Common Root Rot; Crown Rot; Fusarium redolens; Fusarium spp.; Cochliobolus sativus; Subcrown Internode.

…experiment using plate culture and pyrosequencing. Culturable fungal endophytes (colonizing… …usually lower after chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) than pea (Pisum sativum L.)… …communities associated with the roots of a following durum wheat crop. Culturedependent (plate… …communities occupying symptomatic versus asymptomatic roots were analyzed separately in plate… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Esmaeili Taheri, A. (2013). FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH DURUM WHEAT ROOTS IN DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1123

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Esmaeili Taheri, Ahmad. “FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH DURUM WHEAT ROOTS IN DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS.” 2013. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1123.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Esmaeili Taheri, Ahmad. “FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH DURUM WHEAT ROOTS IN DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS.” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Esmaeili Taheri A. FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH DURUM WHEAT ROOTS IN DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1123.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Esmaeili Taheri A. FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH DURUM WHEAT ROOTS IN DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1123

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Western Australia

2. Lin, Tian Ran. Vibration of finite coupled structures, with applications to ship structures.

Degree: PhD, 2005, University of Western Australia

[Truncated abstract] Shipbuilding is fast becoming a priority industry in Australia. With increasing demands to build fast vessels of lighter weight, shipbuilders are more concerned with noise and vibration problems in ships than ever. The objective of this thesis is to study the vibration response of coupled structures, in the hope that the study may shed some light in understanding the general features of ship vibration. An important feature characterizing the vibration in complex structures is the input mobility, as it describes the capacity of structures in accepting vibration energy from sources. The input mobilities of finite ribbed plate and plate/plate coupled structures are investigated analytically and experimentally in this study. It is shown that the input mobility of a finite ribbed plate is bounded by the input mobilities of the uncoupled plate and beam(s) that form the ribbed plate and is dependent upon the distance between the source location and the stiffened beam(s). Off-neutral axis loading on the beam (point force applied on the beam but away from the beam’s neutral axis) affects the input power, kinetic energy distribution in the component plates of the ribbed plate and energy flow into the plates from the beam under direct excitation ... solutions were then used to examine the validity of statistical energy analysis (SEA) in the prediction of vibration response of an L-shaped plate due to deterministic force excitations. It was found that SEA can be utilized to predict the frequency averaged vibration response and energy flow of L-shaped plates under deterministic force (moment) excitations providing that the source location is more than a quarter of wavelength away from the plate edges. Furthermore, a simple experimental method was developed in this study to evaluate the frequency dependent stiffness and damping of rubber mounts by impact test. Finally, analytical methods developed in this study were applied in the prediction of vibration response of a ship structure. It was found that input mobilities of ship hull structures due to machinery excitations are governed by the stiffness of the supporting structure to which the engine is mounted. Their frequency averaged values can be estimated from those of the mounting structure of finite or infinite extents. It was also shown that wave propagation in ship hull structures at low frequencies could be attenuated by irregularities imposed to the periodic locations of the ship frames. The vibration at higher frequencies could be controlled by modifications of the supporting structure.

[Truncated abstract] Shipbuilding is fast becoming a priority industry in Australia. With increasing demands to build fast vessels of lighter weight, shipbuilders are more concerned with noise and vibration problems in ships than ever. The objective of this thesis is to study the vibration response of coupled structures, in the hope that the study may shed some light in understanding the general features of ship vibration. An important feature…

Subjects/Keywords: Vibration (Marine engineering); Plates (Engineering); Input mobility; Finite ribbed plate; Periodic and irregular ribbed plate; Irregular ribbed plate; L-shape plate; Vibration localization; Rubber stiffness; Impact test; Ship structures

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lin, T. R. (2005). Vibration of finite coupled structures, with applications to ship structures. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Western Australia. Retrieved from http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7232&local_base=GEN01-INS01

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lin, Tian Ran. “Vibration of finite coupled structures, with applications to ship structures.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Western Australia. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7232&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lin, Tian Ran. “Vibration of finite coupled structures, with applications to ship structures.” 2005. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lin TR. Vibration of finite coupled structures, with applications to ship structures. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Western Australia; 2005. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7232&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

Council of Science Editors:

Lin TR. Vibration of finite coupled structures, with applications to ship structures. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Western Australia; 2005. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=7232&local_base=GEN01-INS01


Vanderbilt University

3. Ohi, Yuki. Long-range Nodal Signaling in Vertebrate Left-Right Specification.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, 2007, Vanderbilt University

Transient asymmetric Nodal signaling in the left lateral plate mesoderm (L LPM) during tailbud/early somitogenesis stages is associated in all vertebrates examined with the development of stereotypical left-right (L-R) organ asymmetry. In Xenopus, asymmetric expression of Nodal-related 1 (Xnr1) begins in the posterior L LPM shortly after the initiation of bilateral perinotochordal expression in the posterior tailbud. The L LPM expression domain rapidly shifts forward to cover much of the flank of the embryo before being progressively downregulated, also in a posterior-to-anterior (P-to-A) direction. The mechanisms underlying the initiation and propagation of Nodal/Xnr1 expression in the L LPM, and its transient nature, are not well understood. Removing the posterior tailbud domain prevents Xnr1 expression in the L LPM, consistent with the idea that normal embryos respond to a posteriorly derived asymmetrically acting positive inductive signal. The forward propagation of asymmetric Xnr1 expression occurs LPM-autonomously via planar tissue communication. The shifting is prevented by Nodal signaling inhibitors, implicating an underlying requirement for Xnr1-to-Xnr1 induction. It is also unclear how asymmetric Nodal signals are modulated during L-R patterning. Small LPM grafts overexpressing Xnr1 placed into the R LPM of tailbud embryos induced the expression of the normally L-sided genes Xnr1, Xlefty, and XPitx2, and inverted body situs, demonstrating the late-stage plasticity of the LPM. Orthogonal Xnr1 signaling from the LPM strongly induced Xlefty expression in the midline, consistent with findings in the mouse and demonstrating for the first time in another species conservation in the mechanism that induces and maintains midline barrier function. My studies suggest that there is long range contralateral communication between L and R LPM, involving Xlefty in the midline, over a substantial period of tailbud embryogenesis, and therefore lend further insight into how, and for how long, the midline maintains a L versus R status in the LPM. My results directly support very recent findings in mouse that were gathered concurrently and that led to a SELI (Self-Enhancement and Lateral Inhibition) model for pan-embryonic integration of L-R asymmetry information by communication across the midline. The consistency in findings between mouse and Xenopus demonstrate further conservation in the L-R specification program. The unidirectional P-to-A shifting of Xnr1 expression in the L LPM during tailbud stages occurs rapidly within ~6-8 hours. It is uncertain whether the time that is required for the biochemical processes involved in signal receipt, intracellular signal transduction, ligand production and secretion between individual cells can occur fast enough to be accommodated during the period of observed Xnr1 expression shifting. I used a pharmacological approach to block Xnr1 signaling specifically at the level of the receptor to further investigate the role of Xnr1 autoregulation in maintaining and propagating its own… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Chris Wright (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: L-R asymmetry; Xenopus laevis; lateral plate mesoderm; Xnr1; Nodal; Transforming growth factors-beta; Pattern formation (Biology)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ohi, Y. (2007). Long-range Nodal Signaling in Vertebrate Left-Right Specification. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202007-192359/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ohi, Yuki. “Long-range Nodal Signaling in Vertebrate Left-Right Specification.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202007-192359/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ohi, Yuki. “Long-range Nodal Signaling in Vertebrate Left-Right Specification.” 2007. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Ohi Y. Long-range Nodal Signaling in Vertebrate Left-Right Specification. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202007-192359/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Ohi Y. Long-range Nodal Signaling in Vertebrate Left-Right Specification. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202007-192359/ ;

.