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You searched for subject:( Kuta bombings). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Tasmania

1. Lulitanond, V. Culture shock and moral panic. An analysis of three mainstream Australian newspapers' response to the Bali bombings in October 2002 and the arrest of smiling Amrozi on November 2002.

Degree: 2004, University of Tasmania

On the night of 12 October 2002, two bombs exploded in Bali, killing more than 200 people. The first bomb exploded in Paddy's bar, a well known Irish pub in Kuta and was followed by a bigger explosion less than a minute later at the Sari Club. Both were popular venues for Australian tourists. 88 Australians were killed and 196 were injured. The 'Bali bombing', as it came to be known in the media, became a tragedy for all Australians. The Australian media reported this tragedy by covering the stories of victims, the investigation into the bombing, political negotiations between the Indonesian and Australian governments and the capture of some of those allegedly responsible, including the man dubbed 'smiling Amrozi' by the media. This thesis will examine the way three mainstream Australian newspapers reported on the Bali bombing. The three publications, The Australian, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Australian Financial Review were chosen. The analysis will concentrate on the first seven days of coverage of the Bali bombing and the first four days of coverage after the interrogation of Amrozi. This thesis will focus on five different topics: Australian pain, 'Australia owns Bali', Indonesian pain, 'smiling Amrozi' and the way the three selected Australian newspapers reported on Islam. The coverage of the Bali bombing during the first week after the blast emphasised Australian pain and devastation. The press concentrated on the idea that the Bali bombing was an Australian tragedy and implied a sense of ownership over Bali. Bali had been one of Australia's most popular tourist destinations for decades, and after the event, the press reported that 'Terror hits home', and that Australians had lost their paradise. The focus of reporting was on the Australians affected and little room was left for the Indonesians who, especially the Balinese, also lost people in the bombing. The bombing was an economic disaster for the Balinese who lost a large part of their tourist industry, Bali's main income. The coverage, particularly the reporting of the arrest of Amrozi and his reaction, revealed a cultural divide between Australia and Indonesia. Amrozi' s smiling created confusion and anger throughout the Australian community. Confusion also occurred during the reporting of the Bali bombing, with some members of the Australian Muslim community being mistreated by Australians who wrongly believed that Islam has an inherent connection to terrorism.

Subjects/Keywords: Bali bombings; Kuta; Indonesia; reporters and reporting; terrorism; mass media; public opinion; Australia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lulitanond, V. (2004). Culture shock and moral panic. An analysis of three mainstream Australian newspapers' response to the Bali bombings in October 2002 and the arrest of smiling Amrozi on November 2002. (Thesis). University of Tasmania. Retrieved from https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/1/Front-lulitanond-thesis.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/2/whole-lulitanond-thesis.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lulitanond, V. “Culture shock and moral panic. An analysis of three mainstream Australian newspapers' response to the Bali bombings in October 2002 and the arrest of smiling Amrozi on November 2002.” 2004. Thesis, University of Tasmania. Accessed January 22, 2021. https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/1/Front-lulitanond-thesis.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/2/whole-lulitanond-thesis.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lulitanond, V. “Culture shock and moral panic. An analysis of three mainstream Australian newspapers' response to the Bali bombings in October 2002 and the arrest of smiling Amrozi on November 2002.” 2004. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lulitanond V. Culture shock and moral panic. An analysis of three mainstream Australian newspapers' response to the Bali bombings in October 2002 and the arrest of smiling Amrozi on November 2002. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tasmania; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/1/Front-lulitanond-thesis.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/2/whole-lulitanond-thesis.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lulitanond V. Culture shock and moral panic. An analysis of three mainstream Australian newspapers' response to the Bali bombings in October 2002 and the arrest of smiling Amrozi on November 2002. [Thesis]. University of Tasmania; 2004. Available from: https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/1/Front-lulitanond-thesis.pdf ; https://eprints.utas.edu.au/17366/2/whole-lulitanond-thesis.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Chusjairi, Juni A. The construction of an anti-Western Islamist discourse in Indonesian magazines.

Degree: 2014, Western Sydney University

This thesis is a study of the Islamist discourse on terrorism and how western countries are constructed in four Indonesian magazines, Tempo, Gatra, Sabili and SuaraHidayatullah, in relation to the five bombings which took place in Indonesia. I define the first two magazines as the general magazines and the last two as the Islamist magazines. The bombings coverage analysed is that of the Bali bombings 1 and 2, the JW Marriott 1 bombing, the Australian Embassy bombing and the JW Marriott 2/Ritz Carlton bombing. The first study is of the bomb which killed or injured more than 200 people in Kuta, Bali, an area which attracts large numbers of international tourists; the second is of the bomb which exploded in Jimbaran,Bali, also a tourist area; and the last three studies are of the bombings of icons of ‘the West.’ In addition, the way in which the readers of the magazines responded to the reporting of the five bombings analysed is also examined. To address the topic, I conducted research in the offices of four magazines in Jakarta. I copied articles from the Gatra, Sabili and Suara Hidayatullah offices, and Tempo provided me with digital copies. I also interviewed two or three journalists/editors from each magazine. Further, I conducted focus group discussions for the readers of the magazines. Ten focus groups were involved during the fieldwork. There were two groups for each magazine and the other two groups involved readers of both the general and Islamist magazines. The examination of the two general magazines shows that each constructs a different anti-western Islamist discourse in its reports on the terrorism. Gatra, in part, presents the Islamist view and construct that western countries are opposed to Islam, and therefore conspiracy theories concerning who was responsible for the bombings are likely to be true. Tempo, on the other hand, does not present an anti-western Islamist view in its reports. Mainstream views of terrorism are dominant. The comparison of the Islamist magazines shows a similarity in how the Islamists construct anti-western Islamist discourse in their reports. Both Sabili and Suara Hidayatullah view the western countries, mainly the United States, as anti-Islam and as enemies who would try to destroy and undermine Islam. The readers of the magazines generally perceive terrorism in Indonesia from an Islamist perspective, although they do not agree with acts of violence. The readers of both the general and Islamist magazines perceive the western countries (particularly the United States) as being in opposition to Islam and Muslims. The bombings which occurred in Indonesia are viewed with the suspicion that the western countries were involved. These findings show, partly, the Islamisation of society in the social and political context in contemporary Indonesia. They show not only that Islamisation exists in society (as exemplified by the readers), but that, to some extent, the media institution also has been Islamised. In the reform era, the Islamist magazines have the space and opportunity to… Advisors/Committee Members: University of Western Sydney. School of Social Sciences and Psychology (Host institution).

Subjects/Keywords: Bali Bombings, Kuta, Bali, Indonesia, 2002; terrorism; Islamic press; press coverage; press and politics; Indonesia; Thesis (Ph.D.) – University of Western Sydney, 2014

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chusjairi, J. A. (2014). The construction of an anti-Western Islamist discourse in Indonesian magazines. (Thesis). Western Sydney University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1959.7/uws:33163

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chusjairi, Juni A. “The construction of an anti-Western Islamist discourse in Indonesian magazines.” 2014. Thesis, Western Sydney University. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1959.7/uws:33163.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chusjairi, Juni A. “The construction of an anti-Western Islamist discourse in Indonesian magazines.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Chusjairi JA. The construction of an anti-Western Islamist discourse in Indonesian magazines. [Internet] [Thesis]. Western Sydney University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.7/uws:33163.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chusjairi JA. The construction of an anti-Western Islamist discourse in Indonesian magazines. [Thesis]. Western Sydney University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.7/uws:33163

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Australian National University

3. Hollow, Rosemary. How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites .

Degree: 2010, Australian National University

Terrorism and atrocities have scarred the public memory in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Three atrocities, the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, the 1996 massacre at Port Arthur Historic Site in Tasmania, Australia, and the 2002 Bali bombings, had a significant impact on the communities they most affected. How did the differing governments and communities at these sites respond to the sudden loss of life? How were the competing agendas of these groups managed ? Are there shared and distinctive characteristics in the memorialisation of atrocitites across these countries at the turn of the millenium? In responding to these questions, this study analyses cultural differences in memorialisation at contemporary atrocity sites. It examines the differing responses at the case study sites to the planning and the timing of memorials, the engagement of those affected, the memorial designs and the management of the memorials, including tributes. It is an original comparative study of contemporary memorialisation by a heritage professional directly involved in the management of memorials at contemporary atrocity sites. The original research includes the identification of the role the internet in contemporary memorialisation, an in-depth analysis of the memorialisation of the 1996 massacre at Port Arthur Historic Site, and the memorialisation in Bali and across Australia of the 2002 Bali bombings. It extends the current scholarship on the memorialisation of the Oklahoma City bombing through identifying the impact of the internet in the memorialisation and in the timeframe of the analysis through to the 15th anniversary in 2010. The comparative analysis of the management of tributes at all the sites identified issues not previously considered in Australian scholarship: that tributes and the response to them is part of the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites. A combined research method based on an interpretive social science approach was adopted. A range of methodogies were used, including literature reviews, analysis of electronic material, site visits, unstructured in-depth interviews, and participant-observation at memorial services. Studies on history, memory and memorialisation provided the framework for my analysis and led to an original proposal, that all three sites have shared histories of the memorialisation of war and ‘missing’ memorialisation. These shared histories, I argue, strengthened the justification for this comparative study. This comparative study identified differences across the case study countries in the designs of the built memorials, in legislation enacted after the atrocities, the responses to the perpetrators, the marking of anniversaries, and in the management of tributes left at the sites. These…

Subjects/Keywords: Port Arthur Historic Site; Port Arthur massacre; Port Arthur 1996; Huon Pine Cross; Port Arthur anniversary services; interpretation of massacres; interpretation of difficult stories; tributes; offerings at memorials; spontaneous memorials; Martin Bryant; Gun control; National Firearms Agreement; Oklahoma City; Oklahoma City bombing; Oklahoma City 1995; Oklahoma City National Memorial; World Trade Centre; September 11 2001; 9/11; World Trade Centre Memorial; Vietnam Veterans Memorial; Bali bombings; 2002 Bali bombings; Kuta bombings; Bali memorials; Kuta Memorial; Bali memorials in Australia; war memorials in Bali; terrorism; history and memory; tributes; offerings at memorials; dark tourism; memorials; massacre sites; internet and memorials; war memorials; roadside memorials; online memorials; memorial museums; commemoration; traumascapes; cultural memory

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hollow, R. (2010). How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hollow, Rosemary. “How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites .” 2010. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hollow, Rosemary. “How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites .” 2010. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hollow R. How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hollow R. How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.