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You searched for subject:( Kai culator). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Kim, Esther. The Dietary Assessment Software tool requirements of New Zealand Registered Dietitians .

Degree: University of Otago

Background: Dietary assessment forms an integral component of most dietitians’ work and with increasing use of technology, dietary assessment software (DAS) tool use is also increasing. Previously published literature based on expert comments suggest that the most important features of software for dietitians are its user-friendly nature, the database, search strategy, output, price and extra support available. However there is limited literature on the use of DAS among dietitians and what dietitians themselves consider to be important component of DAS tools. Therefore whether their views of DAS experts are congruent with those of dietitians is unknown. The Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago has developed Kai-culator, a web-based DAS tool that has been developed specifically for use within a research and teaching setting. It is of interest to examine whether this tool could be adapted to meet the needs of dietitians in other settings. Aim: To determine DAS needs of current New Zealand (NZ) dietitians and to determine how Kai-culator might be adapted to better meet these requirements Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited participants via a newsletter and email through Dietitians New Zealand. Fifty-two dietitians completed a self-administered online questionnaire to determine NZ dietitians’ current dietary assessment practices, current use of DAS and their ideal DAS tool features. Eight of the participants also trialled Kai-culator and completed a semi-structured in-depth interview with the candidate to determine how they found Kai-culator and how it could be improved to better meet their needs. Results: Most participants (73%) currently use DAS, with Foodworks being the most popular. The main reasons for not using software were lack of time and that it was not suitable for their area of dietetics. Common features described as the best and worst aspects of their current software were dependent on the software used. Features reported as needing improvement overall included the food database, serving size quantification and format of output. Dietitians described their ideal DAS as being easy and intuitive to use, including a comprehensive food database and information on all nutrients presented as tables and graphs as well as comparisons of intake to nutrient reference values (NRVs). Overall, half of the eight dietitians who completed the in-depth interview found Kai-culator to be mainly suitable for their dietetic work. Common reasons dietitians considered Kai-culator suitable were the large database of NZ-specific foods, appropriate portion sizes, easy accessibility and quick to enter data. On the other hand, no comparison to NRVs, lack of nutritional supplements, specialised ‘free-from’ and paediatric products were features that hindered the suitability of Kai-culator. Conclusion: The majority of NZ dietitians surveyed were using DAS tools. This indicates that DAS forms an important component of dietetic practice. With an overall satisfaction rating of only 57% for their… Advisors/Committee Members: Fleming, Liz (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: dietary; assessment; software; dietitians; Kai-culator; foodworks

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, E. (n.d.). The Dietary Assessment Software tool requirements of New Zealand Registered Dietitians . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5545

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No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Esther. “The Dietary Assessment Software tool requirements of New Zealand Registered Dietitians .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5545.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Esther. “The Dietary Assessment Software tool requirements of New Zealand Registered Dietitians .” Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Kim E. The Dietary Assessment Software tool requirements of New Zealand Registered Dietitians . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5545.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim E. The Dietary Assessment Software tool requirements of New Zealand Registered Dietitians . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5545

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.


University of Otago

2. Tully, Alexandra Helen. A comparison of nutrient intakes among participants following three popular weight loss diets .

Degree: University of Otago

Background: Obesity, and its related co-morbidities, is a growing problem that has resulted in the development of numerous weight loss diets, including Mediterranean, Paleo, and Intermittent fasting diets. Whilst weight loss can contribute greatly to reducing the risks of chronic disease, it is vital for health to ensure optimal dietary intakes are achieved. Objectives: To compare the nutritional intakes, and determine the prevalence of inadequate intakes among overweight Dunedin participants consuming a Mediterranean, modified-Paleo, or intermittent fasting diet. Methods: This thesis used the first 112 participants enrolled in the SWIFT weight loss study (from a total of 250 possible participants). Participants were able to choose which particular dietary plan they would like to follow. Participant nutrient intakes including all supplements, foods and beverages were gathered with 3-4 day weighed food diaries. Mean nutrient intakes of each diet intervention group and p-values for the differences between groups were calculated using ANOVA. Prevalence of inadequate nutrient intakes was calculated by comparing usual intakes with nutrient EAR’s. The likelihood of inadequate nutrient intakes was calculated through comparisons of mean nutrient intakes with AI values. The PC-Side method described in this study is used to assess usual dietary intakes, which are then analysed through comparisons with appropriate Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI’s). Results: The demographics and diet choices of our 112 participants were broadly similar to the larger SWIFT sample (n=250). The majority of our 112 participants (57.1%) chose the IF diet, and 28.6% the Mediterranean diet, whereas only 14.3% followed the MP diet. There were no significant differences in energy intakes between diet groups, despite the energy restriction on the IF diet. Analysis of nutritional adequacy revealed that the IF group had a significantly greater prevalence of inadequate intakes of vitamin B6, folate, calcium, magnesium, selenium, and zinc than the Mediterranean diet, and that both groups had a high prevalence of inadequate calcium and folate intakes. The MP participants consumed significantly more cholesterol, SAFA, and MUFA (% energy) than both the IF and Mediterranean diets, and significantly less calcium, and carbohydrate. All groups consumed above the upper limit for sodium and recommendation of 8- 10% TE for SAFA. All diets were at risk of inadequate calcium, dietary fibre, and folate intakes. Conclusion: Our research reveals that IF participants have a significantly greater prevalence of suboptimal intakes than those consuming a Mediterranean diet. Since energy intakes did not differ significantly between groups, this difference in intakes is likely a result of food choice rather than the energy reduction associated with following an IF diet. All diets appeared to be at risk of suboptimal folate, dietary fibre, and calcium intakes, and excessive SAFA and sodium intakes. Future larger studies focusing on nutrient density of the Mediterranean, Paleo,… Advisors/Committee Members: Taylor, Rachael (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Paleo; Paleolithic; diet; mediterranean; intermittent fasting; 5:2; overweight; nutrient intake analysis; PC-Side; dietary reference intakes; SWIFT; usual intakes; obesity; fasting; popular diets; weight loss; kai-culator; nutrient deficiencies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tully, A. H. (n.d.). A comparison of nutrient intakes among participants following three popular weight loss diets . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6309

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tully, Alexandra Helen. “A comparison of nutrient intakes among participants following three popular weight loss diets .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6309.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tully, Alexandra Helen. “A comparison of nutrient intakes among participants following three popular weight loss diets .” Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Tully AH. A comparison of nutrient intakes among participants following three popular weight loss diets . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6309.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Tully AH. A comparison of nutrient intakes among participants following three popular weight loss diets . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6309

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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