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1. Stiemsma, Shaun. Dramatic Form in the Early Modern English History Play.

Degree: 2017, The Catholic University of America

The early modern history play has been assumed to exist as an independent genre at least since Shakespeare’s first folio divided his plays into comedies, tragedies, and histories. However, history has never—neither during the period nor in literary criticism since—been satisfactorily defined as a distinct dramatic genre. I argue that this lack of definition obtains because early modern playwrights did not deliberately create a new genre. Instead, playwrights using history as a basis for drama recognized aspects of established genres in historical source material and incorporated them into plays about history. Thus, this study considers the ways in which playwrights dramatizing history use, manipulate, and invert the structures and conventions of the more clearly defined genres of morality, comedy, and tragedy. Each chapter examines examples to discover generic patterns present in historical plays and to assess the ways historical materials resist the conceptions of time suggested by established dramatic genres. John Bale’s King Johan and the anonymous Woodstock both use a morality structure on a loosely contrived history but cannot force history to conform to the apocalyptic resolution the genre demands. Marlowe’s Edward II takes many aspects of the same genre but inverts them to show a bitter and tragic historical perspective. Conversely, Shakespeare’s Henry IV plays engage in competing modes of comic time, as Falstaff’s saturnalian comedy succumbs to Prince Hal’s long-planned comic resolution to his own morality play. Another conventional comic resolution—marriage—is explored using the close of both Richard III and Henry V, and in both cases Shakespeare affirms and limits the unified resolution that marriage offers to historical events. As one of the last “histories,” John Ford’s Perkin Warbeck presents what its author calls “Chronicle History” as a tragedy that denies its audience the certainty that chronicles offer. Finally, Robert Greene’s ahistorical James IV is used to reconsider the parameters of the history play, finding that even a highly fictionalized account can create distinct effects between known history and generic conventions. Through the exploration of these plays, this study intends to suggest the simultaneous interdependence and incompatibility of history and dramatic form.

English literature

History

early modern, history play, John Bale, John Ford, Marlowe, Shakespeare

English Language and Literature

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. English Language and Literature. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: The Catholic University of America (Degree granting institution), Mack, Michael (Thesis advisor), Paxton, Jennifer (Committee member), Gregory, Tobias (Committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: early modern; history play; John Bale; John Ford; Marlowe; Shakespeare

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stiemsma, S. (2017). Dramatic Form in the Early Modern English History Play. (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:64718

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stiemsma, Shaun. “Dramatic Form in the Early Modern English History Play.” 2017. Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:64718.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stiemsma, Shaun. “Dramatic Form in the Early Modern English History Play.” 2017. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Stiemsma S. Dramatic Form in the Early Modern English History Play. [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:64718.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stiemsma S. Dramatic Form in the Early Modern English History Play. [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:64718

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Otago

2. Cop, Michael Andrew. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .

Degree: 2011, University of Otago

Early modern English biblical verse at times seems clumsy or repetitious. This thesis argues that some of this poetic and narrative dissonance originates in the biblical events that poets and versifiers turned into verse. The Bible often reports events differently across its books. Such differing narrative strands are often dissonant: they do not report one unified, harmonious story. Early modern readers habitually thought across differing biblical narrative strands because biblical commentary, gospel harmonies, and the margins of the Bible itself encouraged their readers to do so; those same readers also believed that the differing narrative strands tell a harmonious story because they believed that the words of the Bible are consistent. Modern readers often do not share that same habit or belief. If we are to have informed readings of early modern biblical verse, we need to recapture the habit of thinking across the Bible and the belief that beneath the apparent biblical dissonance was an underlying consonance. My research indicates that when the Bible has conflicting details for an event, poets and versifiers sometimes include that conflict in their verse and thereby inherit biblical dissonance. The introduction exhibits the habit of thinking across the Bible in prose through the examples of biblical marginalia and commentaries as well as through the fullest textual representation of this habit, gospel harmonies. The subsequent chapters examine biblical verse, each exploring a story for which the relationship between biblical narrative strands becomes increasingly complex. Chapter 1 establishes what it means to versify the Bible by taking some metrical psalms and then versions of the Samson story as examples of poets and versifiers working on parts of the Bible for which there is only a single narrative strand but which still contain inconsistencies. Chapter 2 addresses versions of the Creation, a story for which there are two differing biblical narrative strands. The chapter classifies four methods of engaging biblical difference in verse through the examples of William Hunnis’s A Hyve Fvll of Hunnye, Joshua Sylvester’s translation of Guillaume de Saluste Du Bartas’s The Divine Weeks, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, and John Dryden’s The State of Innocence. Chapter 3 looks at the temptations of Jesus, a story for which there are three differing biblical narrative strands; it demonstrates specific rhetorical strategies for including biblical differences in verse through the examples of John Bale’s, Giles Fletcher’s, Henry Vaughan’s, John Milton’s, and Samuel Wesley’s versions of the temptation story. Chapter 4 explores the story of the anointing of Jesus, a story for which the relationship amongst the four differing narrative strands is ambiguous, and demonstrates that the more complex the relationship is amongst differing strands, the less likely versions are to incorporate the all of the differences from amongst those strands. The thesis concludes with a new reading of George Herbert’s “The Sacrifice,” a poem… Advisors/Committee Members: Tribble, Lyn (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Early Modern English Verse; The Bible; John Milton; John Dryden; Du Bartas; George Herbert; Henry Vaughan; Gospel Harmonies; Metrical Psalms; Harmonization; Samson; Francis Quarles; Creation; The Temptations; Mary Magdalene; Johan Hiud; Henry Garthwait; John Bale; Zachary Boyd; Giles Fletcher; Samuel Wesley; Paradise Lost; Paradise Regained; Samson Agonistes; The Anointing; William Hunnis; The Sacrifice; John Bunyan; The Divine Weeks; Synoptic Gospels; Gerard De Gols; Lewis Wager; Elisha Coles; Gervase Markham; George Sandys; George Wither; Thomas Sternhold; English Renaissance

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cop, M. A. (2011). Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cop, Michael Andrew. “Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cop, Michael Andrew. “Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .” 2011. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Cop MA. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843.

Council of Science Editors:

Cop MA. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843

.