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You searched for subject:( Hacktivists). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Swift, Kathy. A Web of Extended Metaphors in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto of Aaron Swartz.

Degree: 2017, University of California – eScholarship, University of California

Hacktivists tend to be an anonymous group of individuals asynchronously distributed across widely different locales around the planet. They frequently use computers and other forms of information and communication technologies (ICT) to advance such digital rights causes as free culture and open access to the Internet, in addition to the open source software movement. Their arguments against the encroachments of intellectual property rights on the digital commons have pitted them against government and corporate institutions with vested security and remunerative interests in the World Wide Web. While a great many studies have been conducted on the sociological and historical implications of the hacktivist phenomenon, few if any have been conducted on the underlying stances and arguments of the hacktivist community and the corporations and governments they frequently oppose. For my research, I have analyzed linguistic framing and metaphor usage in combination with theories of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), Frame Semantics, and Cognitive Linguistics as a means to examine the stances of three principal antagonists in the debate over freedom of information on the Internet: 1) hackers and hacktivists; 2) civil rights groups; and 3) governments and corporations. I have focused in particular on the hacktivist, Aaron Swartz, whose authorship of Guerilla Open Access Manifesto (2015, p. 26) coupled with his act of content liberation when he downloaded millions of academic articles, led to his indictment by the Department of Justice.My eclectic methodology serves to unpack the construction of meaning arising from texts produced by and about hacktivists with a focus on linguistic framing as a tool for analyzing the metaphors that inform stances. Relevant to my study has been the function of metaphorical concepts as ways to create complex frames that in turn capture the attitudes, values, and beliefs that accompany the stances associated with metanarratives and worldviews. Such a methodology has helped elucidate the conflicting epistemological attitude of hacktivists and authorities toward online freedom of information.The findings of my study reveal that the metaphors used to talk about the social epistemology of the Internet lie at the heart of the debate. Lakoff and Johnson’s expansion on Michael Reddy’s conduit metaphor has been meaningfully applied to an interpretation of the Internet itself in order to facilitate an understanding of the significance of the knowledge ecology in the Information Age. My findings show that Reddy’s conduit metaphor is directly implicated in the downfall of Aaron Swartz and provides a cautionary tale for those fighting to preserve public access to the electronic knowledge commons.

Subjects/Keywords: Intellectual property; Educational philosophy; Educational sociology; Aaron Swartz; Conceptual Metaphors; Freedom of Information; Hackers and Hacktivists; Intellectual property rights; Social Epistemology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Swift, K. (2017). A Web of Extended Metaphors in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto of Aaron Swartz. (Thesis). University of California – eScholarship, University of California. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6w76f8x7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swift, Kathy. “A Web of Extended Metaphors in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto of Aaron Swartz.” 2017. Thesis, University of California – eScholarship, University of California. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6w76f8x7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swift, Kathy. “A Web of Extended Metaphors in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto of Aaron Swartz.” 2017. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Swift K. A Web of Extended Metaphors in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto of Aaron Swartz. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – eScholarship, University of California; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6w76f8x7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Swift K. A Web of Extended Metaphors in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto of Aaron Swartz. [Thesis]. University of California – eScholarship, University of California; 2017. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6w76f8x7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Australian National University

2. Benson, Tracey. Cross Connections: Online Activism, Real World Outcomes .

Degree: 2010, Australian National University

This research paper examines the role of the Internet as it relates to the development of social movements and political protest in the ‘physical’ world. It also analyses the role of independent media and reporting methodologies used by activists and net-artists. The emergence of online activism and an emphasis on collaboration, information sharing and open source tools also had a significant impact on new media arts discussions and aesthetics. The refugee activist movement in Australia is a key case study in this thesis, as it is an excellent example of how activists have used the Internet and WWW to garner support within the community and to engage people to come to protests. In addition, activists at the protests have reported these events on the WWW and this subject has also had a resounding impact within the context of contemporary and media arts. The implications of identity online is a major factor in constructing the arguments in this thesis, as the relationship between ‘real’ and ‘virtual’ space is explored in detail as it relates to personal identity and online community.

Subjects/Keywords: Internet; World Wide Web; Accessibility; Activism; Social Relations; Social Justice; Hacktivists; Online; Hackers; Identity; Net Activism; Tactical Media; Web Design; Virtuality; Virtual Communities; Refugee; Borders; Alienation; Censorship; Blogging; Mass Media; Copy-left; Open Source Publishing; Produser; Indymedia; Net Arts; Digital Archives; You Tube; Facebook; Social Networking; Digital Aesthetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Benson, T. (2010). Cross Connections: Online Activism, Real World Outcomes . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/147416

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Benson, Tracey. “Cross Connections: Online Activism, Real World Outcomes .” 2010. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/147416.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Benson, Tracey. “Cross Connections: Online Activism, Real World Outcomes .” 2010. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Benson T. Cross Connections: Online Activism, Real World Outcomes . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/147416.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Benson T. Cross Connections: Online Activism, Real World Outcomes . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/147416

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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