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You searched for subject:( Francis Quarles). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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The Ohio State University

1. Clark, Rachel Ellen. Textual Ghosts: Sidney, Shakespeare, and the Elizabethans in Caroline England.

Degree: PhD, English, 2011, The Ohio State University

This dissertation argues that during the reign of Charles I (1625-42), a powerful and long-lasting nationalist discourse emerged that embodied a conflicted nostalgia and located a primary source of English national identity in the Elizabethan era, rooted in the works of William Shakespeare, Sir Philip Sidney, John Lyly, and Ben Jonson. This Elizabethanism attempted to reconcile increasingly hostile conflicts between Catholics and Protestants, court and country, and elite and commoners. Remarkably, as I show by examining several Caroline texts in which Elizabethan ghosts appear, Caroline authors often resurrect long-dead Elizabethan figures to articulate not only Puritan views but also Arminian and Catholic ones. This tendency to complicate associations between the Elizabethan era and militant Protestantism also appears in Caroline plays by Thomas Heywood, Philip Massinger, and William Sampson that figure Queen Elizabeth as both ideally Protestant and dangerously ambiguous. Furthermore, Caroline Elizabethanism included reprintings and adaptations of Elizabethan literature that reshape the ideological significance of the Elizabethan era. The 1630s quarto editions of Shakespeare’s Elizabethan comedies The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Taming of the Shrew, and Love’s Labour’s Lost represent the Elizabethan era as the source of a native English wit that bridges social divides and negotiates the roles of powerful women (a renewed concern as Queen Henrietta Maria became more conspicuous at court). Similarly, poetic and dramatic adaptations of Sidney’s Arcadia by Francis Quarles, Henry Glapthorne, and James Shirley rewrite the romance’s politics to engage with contemporary debates about foreign policy. This dissertation ultimately contributes to early modern literary studies in three ways: first, it reclaims and nuances the literary and political sophistication of Caroline literature; second, it contests the narrative that casts the Elizabethan era as perennially opposed to the decadence of the Stuarts, instead showing how Caroline Elizabethanism sanctioned a proto-royalist literary and political culture and ideology that extended well beyond the court; and third, it reveals how Caroline writers and publishers began the process of literary canon formation as a way to negotiate what it meant to be English, linking nationalism with England’s literary heritage in debates that continue to resonate today. Advisors/Committee Members: Dutton, Richard (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: British and Irish Literature; Literature; elizabethanism; elizabeth i; charles i; henrietta maria; print culture; nostalgia; cultural memory; nationalism; nationhood; william shakespeare; sir philip sidney; francis quarles; thomas heywood; james shirley; philip massinger

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APA (6th Edition):

Clark, R. E. (2011). Textual Ghosts: Sidney, Shakespeare, and the Elizabethans in Caroline England. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1312205135

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clark, Rachel Ellen. “Textual Ghosts: Sidney, Shakespeare, and the Elizabethans in Caroline England.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1312205135.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clark, Rachel Ellen. “Textual Ghosts: Sidney, Shakespeare, and the Elizabethans in Caroline England.” 2011. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Clark RE. Textual Ghosts: Sidney, Shakespeare, and the Elizabethans in Caroline England. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1312205135.

Council of Science Editors:

Clark RE. Textual Ghosts: Sidney, Shakespeare, and the Elizabethans in Caroline England. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1312205135


McMaster University

2. Pope, Johnathan. An Anatomy of the Soul In English Renaissance Religious Poetry.

Degree: PhD, 2009, McMaster University

This dissertation examines the centrality of the soul-body relationship to the construction of identity in English Renaissance religious poetry. The expanding field of 'body criticism' has greatly increased our understanding of the early modern body, but critics have rarely considered how Christianity influenced the ways the early moderns thought about their bodies and their embodied souls at a time when the science of anatomy flourished in Europe. Consequently, our current perception of the early modern subject is skewed. This dissertation addresses this critical gap by exploring the persistence of Christian narratives in discussions of both the body and the soul throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The first two chapters address two interrelated question: how did early modern anatomists understand the soul, and how did early modern religious writers understand the body? This dissertation begins by examining the religious perspectives that are evident in English anatomical writing and then moves on to explore the presence of anatomical perspectives in English religious writing on the soul in order to discuss the intimate relationship between corporeality and spirituality. The final two chapters focus on the devotional poetry of An Collins and the devotional emblems of Francis Quarles in order to demonstrate the integration of a Christianized sense of corporeality into meditations on religious subjectivity. Both writers draw on the issues discussed in the first two chapters but represent corporeality differently. On the one hand, Collins transforms physical suffering into a sign of her salvation. On the other hand, Quarles expresses anxiety over the world's ability to infect the soul through the body. In both cases, the relationship between body and soul is a central concern, and their representation of that relationship is indebted to a Christianized sense of embodiment.

Thesis

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Silcox, Mary V., English.

Subjects/Keywords: soul; body; soul-body relationship; identity; religous poetry; Christianity; moderns; anatomy; An Collins; Francis Quarles; meditiations; religion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pope, J. (2009). An Anatomy of the Soul In English Renaissance Religious Poetry. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17384

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pope, Johnathan. “An Anatomy of the Soul In English Renaissance Religious Poetry.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17384.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pope, Johnathan. “An Anatomy of the Soul In English Renaissance Religious Poetry.” 2009. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Pope J. An Anatomy of the Soul In English Renaissance Religious Poetry. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17384.

Council of Science Editors:

Pope J. An Anatomy of the Soul In English Renaissance Religious Poetry. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17384


University of Otago

3. Cop, Michael Andrew. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .

Degree: 2011, University of Otago

Early modern English biblical verse at times seems clumsy or repetitious. This thesis argues that some of this poetic and narrative dissonance originates in the biblical events that poets and versifiers turned into verse. The Bible often reports events differently across its books. Such differing narrative strands are often dissonant: they do not report one unified, harmonious story. Early modern readers habitually thought across differing biblical narrative strands because biblical commentary, gospel harmonies, and the margins of the Bible itself encouraged their readers to do so; those same readers also believed that the differing narrative strands tell a harmonious story because they believed that the words of the Bible are consistent. Modern readers often do not share that same habit or belief. If we are to have informed readings of early modern biblical verse, we need to recapture the habit of thinking across the Bible and the belief that beneath the apparent biblical dissonance was an underlying consonance. My research indicates that when the Bible has conflicting details for an event, poets and versifiers sometimes include that conflict in their verse and thereby inherit biblical dissonance. The introduction exhibits the habit of thinking across the Bible in prose through the examples of biblical marginalia and commentaries as well as through the fullest textual representation of this habit, gospel harmonies. The subsequent chapters examine biblical verse, each exploring a story for which the relationship between biblical narrative strands becomes increasingly complex. Chapter 1 establishes what it means to versify the Bible by taking some metrical psalms and then versions of the Samson story as examples of poets and versifiers working on parts of the Bible for which there is only a single narrative strand but which still contain inconsistencies. Chapter 2 addresses versions of the Creation, a story for which there are two differing biblical narrative strands. The chapter classifies four methods of engaging biblical difference in verse through the examples of William Hunnis’s A Hyve Fvll of Hunnye, Joshua Sylvester’s translation of Guillaume de Saluste Du Bartas’s The Divine Weeks, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, and John Dryden’s The State of Innocence. Chapter 3 looks at the temptations of Jesus, a story for which there are three differing biblical narrative strands; it demonstrates specific rhetorical strategies for including biblical differences in verse through the examples of John Bale’s, Giles Fletcher’s, Henry Vaughan’s, John Milton’s, and Samuel Wesley’s versions of the temptation story. Chapter 4 explores the story of the anointing of Jesus, a story for which the relationship amongst the four differing narrative strands is ambiguous, and demonstrates that the more complex the relationship is amongst differing strands, the less likely versions are to incorporate the all of the differences from amongst those strands. The thesis concludes with a new reading of George Herbert’s “The Sacrifice,” a poem… Advisors/Committee Members: Tribble, Lyn (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Early Modern English Verse; The Bible; John Milton; John Dryden; Du Bartas; George Herbert; Henry Vaughan; Gospel Harmonies; Metrical Psalms; Harmonization; Samson; Francis Quarles; Creation; The Temptations; Mary Magdalene; Johan Hiud; Henry Garthwait; John Bale; Zachary Boyd; Giles Fletcher; Samuel Wesley; Paradise Lost; Paradise Regained; Samson Agonistes; The Anointing; William Hunnis; The Sacrifice; John Bunyan; The Divine Weeks; Synoptic Gospels; Gerard De Gols; Lewis Wager; Elisha Coles; Gervase Markham; George Sandys; George Wither; Thomas Sternhold; English Renaissance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cop, M. A. (2011). Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cop, Michael Andrew. “Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cop, Michael Andrew. “Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse .” 2011. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Cop MA. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843.

Council of Science Editors:

Cop MA. Thinking across the Bible: Consonance and Dissonance in Early Modern English Biblical Verse . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/1843

.