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You searched for subject:( Family buffering). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of South Africa

1. Moss, Susara Maria. Exploring family resilience amongst South African social work client families .

Degree: 2010, University of South Africa

Family resilience is the ability of a family to rebound from adversities, often stronger than before. To be knowledgeable on the characteristics and processes that render individuals and their families resilient, contribute to family well-being. Using a qualitative research approach and an interview guide, the researcher focused on developing a better understanding of the manifestation of family resilience as part of a family’s ability to adapt to changing circumstances and life in its dynamic form. Family resilience as an interactive process over time, normalizes resilience as part of the day to day living of the family and its members, including the young and the old. The domains of family resilience are, organizational patterns, adaptability, protective processes (including family risks, family strengths and protective/buffering factors), communication processes and family belief systems that, in synergy with one another, render families resilient. The research results confirmed the presence of characteristics and processes of family resilience amongst social work client families in South Africa. Depending on the challenges families my face, all families are either more resilient or less resilient. The latter most often needing additional support, such as social work intervention. South African policies should be family-focused and urge for a strengths-based approach towards enhancing family resilience and ultimately family well-being. Service providers need to give recognition to the fact that all families have challenges that need to be faced, but that families also have strengths to be drawn-upon to address and overcome these challenges. This implies that social work interventions that impact on the lives of families, should be rendered from a family resilience perspective and strengths-based approach, with the family as focal point for service delivery. Advisors/Committee Members: Van der Delft, W.F. (Prof.) (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Individual resilience; Family resilience; Family policy; Risk factors; Family buffering; Protective factors; Strengths-based approach; Family resilience approach; Family well-being

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APA (6th Edition):

Moss, S. M. (2010). Exploring family resilience amongst South African social work client families . (Masters Thesis). University of South Africa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3405

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moss, Susara Maria. “Exploring family resilience amongst South African social work client families .” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of South Africa. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3405.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moss, Susara Maria. “Exploring family resilience amongst South African social work client families .” 2010. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Moss SM. Exploring family resilience amongst South African social work client families . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Africa; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3405.

Council of Science Editors:

Moss SM. Exploring family resilience amongst South African social work client families . [Masters Thesis]. University of South Africa; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3405


Antioch University

2. Pearce, Emily Anna. The Stress-Buffering Model of Social Support in Post-Acute Brain Injury Rehabilitation.

Degree: Psy. D., Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology, 2016, Antioch University

Currently, 3.2-5.3 million Americans (1.1-1.7%) live with long-term disability resulting from acquired brain injury (ABI). Despite two to three million more being treated yearly for milder injuries and released without further services, those with enduring problems often require ongoing rehabilitation and support. The immediate and long-term costs of ABI are substantial, as are the burdens associated with lifelong sequelae. A clear understanding of prognostic indicators—only some of which have been identified—could assist in reducing these costs and burdens. Social support, which has been linked with physical health and function in populations across the world, is one likely indicator. Family stress, which may influence the availability of social support and which has been independently linked to functional outcomes in various populations, is another. Somewhat surprisingly, the relationship of either with functional outcomes in ABI has yet to be firmly established. Framed by the Stress-Buffering Model of social support, this study examined the extent to which family stress predicts physical function following ABI and whether and how social support moderates this relationship. Data for this study was obtained from a national brain injury database (OutcomeInfo). OutcomeInfo houses demographic, injury, medical, service, and administrative information, as well as ratings and scores from the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory—Fourth Edition (MPAI-4). The MPAI-4 is a questionnaire designed for use in post-acute rehabilitation and support programs, intended to allow facilities to track outcomes and changes throughout treatment. Bivariate Pearson and partial correlation were used in this study to gather preliminary information about the Stress-Buffering Model’s applicability within these post-acute services. Bivariate Pearson correlations revealed no significant relationships between family stress or friend support and physical function. Partial correlations revealed no significant relationships when controlling for several personal and contextual variables both individually and concurrently. This study had several limitations, and results should not be generalized at this point. Despite the lack of significant results, this study presents a coherent conceptual framework within which to examine these relationships further and provides a research design upon which future investigators may build. Advisors/Committee Members: Tremblay, George (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical Psychology; brain injury; rehabilitation; outcome; family stress; social support; friend support; physical function; Stress-Buffering; Mayo-Portland; MPAI-4

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pearce, E. A. (2016). The Stress-Buffering Model of Social Support in Post-Acute Brain Injury Rehabilitation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Antioch University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1493120784985772

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pearce, Emily Anna. “The Stress-Buffering Model of Social Support in Post-Acute Brain Injury Rehabilitation.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Antioch University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1493120784985772.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pearce, Emily Anna. “The Stress-Buffering Model of Social Support in Post-Acute Brain Injury Rehabilitation.” 2016. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pearce EA. The Stress-Buffering Model of Social Support in Post-Acute Brain Injury Rehabilitation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Antioch University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1493120784985772.

Council of Science Editors:

Pearce EA. The Stress-Buffering Model of Social Support in Post-Acute Brain Injury Rehabilitation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Antioch University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1493120784985772


Brigham Young University

3. Van Langeveld, Alisa Danielle Cox. Sibling Relationships, Stress, and Well-Being During Early Adolescence.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Brigham Young University

This study examined whether the quality of the sibling relationship can alter the negative impact of stress on child well being. Participants were of 311 families (236 two parent families and 75 single parent families) with an adolescent child (M age of child at Time 1 = 11.25, SD = .99, 51% female) who took part in the Flourishing Families Project. Data were assessed using both a multiple time point cross-section and a two wave longitudinal design. Hierarchal linear regression suggested that when assessing the direct effects of sibling on well being, sibling affection is a better predictor of well being, but when assessing indirect effects, sibling conflict is a better predictor. Little evidence was found to support the idea that siblings moderate the impact of stress by buffering or decreasing the negative impact of stress. Results did indicate that sibling conflict was a salient moderator of stress in that conflict exacerbates the already negative impact of stress. Results from this study also suggest that when assessing the buffering or exacerbating impact of siblings, cross-sectional data produces better explanatory power than when these constructs are assessed longitudinally. However a single time point, cross-sectional design does not account for dynamic changes over time in either the sibling relationship, the level of stress or well being. Research designs such as multiple time, point cross-sectional studies or growth curve analyses are recommended.

Subjects/Keywords: sibling affection; sibling conflict; moderator; Flourishing Families project; exacerbating; buffering; prosocial behavior; internalizing problem behavior; resilience; Van Langeveld; Family, Life Course, and Society

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Langeveld, A. D. C. (2010). Sibling Relationships, Stress, and Well-Being During Early Adolescence. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3350&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Langeveld, Alisa Danielle Cox. “Sibling Relationships, Stress, and Well-Being During Early Adolescence.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Brigham Young University. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3350&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Langeveld, Alisa Danielle Cox. “Sibling Relationships, Stress, and Well-Being During Early Adolescence.” 2010. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Van Langeveld ADC. Sibling Relationships, Stress, and Well-Being During Early Adolescence. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brigham Young University; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3350&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Van Langeveld ADC. Sibling Relationships, Stress, and Well-Being During Early Adolescence. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brigham Young University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3350&context=etd

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